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is anybody aware of a list of exactly what triggers ASP.NET's HttpRequestValidationException? [This is behind the common error: "A potentially dangerous Request.Form value was detected," etc.]

I've checked here, around the Web, and MSDN Library but can't find this documented. I'm aware of some ways to generate the error, but would like to have a complete list so I can guard against and selectively circumvent it (I know how to disable request validation for a page, but this isn't an option in this case).

Is it a case of "security through obscurity"?

[Note: Scripts won't load for me in IE8 (as described frequently in the Meta forum) so I won't be able to "Add comment."]

EDIT 1: Hi Oded, are you aware of a list that documents the conditions used to determine a "potentially malicious input string"? That's what I'm looking for.

EDIT 2: @Chris Pebble: Yeah, what you said. :)

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1  
+1 There appears to be a dearth of information regarding this error. Finding a list of everything RequestValidation protects from would be very useful. –  Chris Van Opstal Feb 4 '10 at 15:39
    
Yeah, unfortunately we can't just read the source code. Hopefully somebody who reads this knows or can find out. [Finally got them to install Firefox for me so I can comment--not admin on my machine.] –  TK-421 Feb 4 '10 at 17:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I couldn't find a document outlining a conclusive list, but looking through Reflector and doing some analysis on use of HttpRequestValidationException, it looks like validation errors on the following can cause the request validation to fail:

  • A filename in one of the files POSTed to an upload.
  • The incoming request raw URL.
  • The value portion of the name/value pair from any of the incoming cookies.
  • The value portion of the name/value pair from any of the fields coming in through GET/POST.

The question, then, is "what qualifies one of these things as a dangerous input?" That seems to happen during an internal method System.Web.CrossSiteScriptingValidation.IsDangerousString(string, out int) which looks like it decides this way:

  1. Look for < or & in the value. If it's not there, or if it's the last character in the value, then the value is OK.
  2. If the & character is in a &# sequence (e.g., &#160; for a non-breaking space), it's a "dangerous string."
  3. If the < character is part of <x (where "x" is any alphabetic character a-z), <!, </, or <?, it's a "dangerous string."
  4. Failing all of that, the value is OK.

The System.Web.CrossSiteScriptingValidation type seems to have other methods in it for determining if things are dangerous URLs or valid JavaScript IDs, but those don't appear, at least through Reflector analysis, to result in throwing HttpRequestValidationExceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Travis--I'm reviewing your list along with the code The Matt listed below. [Can't I mark them both as answers? ;)] So it seems like it's basically '<(alpha)+' and '&#' it's concerned about, and this matches my testing. –  TK-421 Feb 12 '10 at 18:57

Using Reflector, I did some browsing. Here's the raw code. When I have time I will translate this into some meaningful rules:

The HttpRequestValidationException is thrown by only a single method in the System.Web namespace, so it's rather isolated. Here is the method:

private void ValidateString(string s, string valueName, string collectionName)
{
    int matchIndex = 0;
    if (CrossSiteScriptingValidation.IsDangerousString(s, out matchIndex))
    {
        string str = valueName + "=\"";
        int startIndex = matchIndex - 10;
        if (startIndex <= 0)
        {
            startIndex = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            str = str + "...";
        }
        int length = matchIndex + 20;
        if (length >= s.Length)
        {
            length = s.Length;
            str = str + s.Substring(startIndex, length - startIndex) + "\"";
        }
        else
        {
            str = str + s.Substring(startIndex, length - startIndex) + "...\"";
        }
        throw new HttpRequestValidationException(HttpRuntime.FormatResourceString("Dangerous_input_detected", collectionName, str));
    }
}

That method above makes a call to the IsDangerousString method in the CrossSiteScriptingValidation class, which validates the string against a series of rules. It looks like the following:

internal static bool IsDangerousString(string s, out int matchIndex)
{
    matchIndex = 0;
    int startIndex = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        int index = s.IndexOfAny(startingChars, startIndex);
        if (index < 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (index == (s.Length - 1))
        {
            return false;
        }
        matchIndex = index;
        switch (s[index])
        {
            case 'E':
            case 'e':
                if (IsDangerousExpressionString(s, index))
                {
                    return true;
                }
                break;

            case 'O':
            case 'o':
                if (!IsDangerousOnString(s, index))
                {
                    break;
                }
                return true;

            case '&':
                if (s[index + 1] != '#')
                {
                    break;
                }
                return true;

            case '<':
                if (!IsAtoZ(s[index + 1]) && (s[index + 1] != '!'))
                {
                    break;
                }
                return true;

            case 'S':
            case 's':
                if (!IsDangerousScriptString(s, index))
                {
                    break;
                }
                return true;
        }
        startIndex = index + 1;
    }
}

That IsDangerousString method appears to be referencing a series of validation rules, which are outlined below:

private static bool IsDangerousExpressionString(string s, int index)
{
    if ((index + 10) >= s.Length)
    {
        return false;
    }
    if ((s[index + 1] != 'x') && (s[index + 1] != 'X'))
    {
        return false;
    }
    return (string.Compare(s, index + 2, "pression(", 0, 9, true, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) == 0);
}

-

private static bool IsDangerousOnString(string s, int index)
{
    if ((s[index + 1] != 'n') && (s[index + 1] != 'N'))
    {
        return false;
    }
    if ((index > 0) && IsAtoZ(s[index - 1]))
    {
        return false;
    }
    int length = s.Length;
    index += 2;
    while ((index < length) && IsAtoZ(s[index]))
    {
        index++;
    }
    while ((index < length) && char.IsWhiteSpace(s[index]))
    {
        index++;
    }
    return ((index < length) && (s[index] == '='));
}

-

private static bool IsAtoZ(char c)
{
    return (((c >= 'a') && (c <= 'z')) || ((c >= 'A') && (c <= 'Z')));
}

-

private static bool IsDangerousScriptString(string s, int index)
{
    int length = s.Length;
    if ((index + 6) >= length)
    {
        return false;
    }
    if ((((s[index + 1] != 'c') && (s[index + 1] != 'C')) || ((s[index + 2] != 'r') && (s[index + 2] != 'R'))) || ((((s[index + 3] != 'i') && (s[index + 3] != 'I')) || ((s[index + 4] != 'p') && (s[index + 4] != 'P'))) || ((s[index + 5] != 't') && (s[index + 5] != 'T'))))
    {
        return false;
    }
    index += 6;
    while ((index < length) && char.IsWhiteSpace(s[index]))
    {
        index++;
    }
    return ((index < length) && (s[index] == ':'));
}

So there you have it. It's not pretty to decipher, but it's all there.

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Thanks Mr. Matt--good call on using Reflector. I'm looking over your response along with Travis' to get a handle on this--basically it seems to be two scenarios that we need to be concerned with (left angle bracket w/ alpha char and ampersand w/ number sign). –  TK-421 Feb 12 '10 at 19:37

How about this script? Your code can not detect this script, right?

";}alert(1);function%20a(){//
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True.I faced one situation like this where the script is injected like this and it got rendered in a commented line of javascript via RAZOR token.The commented js contained a RAZOR token –  Joymon Feb 18 at 12:20

From MSDN:

'The exception that is thrown when a potentially malicious input string is received from the client as part of the request data. '

Many times this happens when JavaScript changes the values of a server side control in a way that causes the ViewState to not agree with the posted data.

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2  
True, but I think the OP was looking for a list characters or combination of characters that would trigger this. He likely knows <html> tags will trigger this error but there are a bunch of other subtle ways to trigger it as well, which is why I believe he's looking for a complete list of all triggers. –  Chris Van Opstal Feb 4 '10 at 15:28

Try this regular expresson pattern.

You may need to ecape the \ for javascript ex \\

var regExpPattern = '[eE][xX][pP][rR][eE][sS][sS][iI][oO][nN]\\(|\\b[oO][nN][a-zA-Z]*\\b\\s*=|&#|<[!/a-zA-Z]|[sS][cC][rR][iI][pP][tT]\\s*:';
var re = new RegExp("","gi");
re.compile(regExpPattern,"gi");
var outString = null;
outString = re.exec(text);
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