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What I want is to wait for a certain delay AFTER the start of my method BEFORE calling my busy indicator :

  • if the method is complete before that delay, my busy indicator won't show up.
  • if the method take more time than my delay to complete. My busy indicator will show up until the end of the method and it will shut down at the completion.

Thanks for your help !

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closed as off-topic by Jason Coco, Gavin, vonbrand, karlphillip, GargantuChet Feb 25 '14 at 18:49

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – Jason Coco, Gavin, vonbrand, karlphillip, GargantuChet
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Do you have any code to show where you stuck? And what in general have you tried to solve it? – beryllium Feb 25 '14 at 8:29
    
You guys teach the newbies everything other than what they are looking for. – EmptyStack Feb 25 '14 at 8:40
up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can try:

having a bool property called completed.

perform selector after delay //(some selector showBusy, some delay)
completed = NO;
dispatch_queue_t myqueue = dispatch_queue_create("queue", NULL);
dispatch_async(myqueue, ^{
        //your long time operation (must not do any UI changes here)
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
         //UI here 
         completed = YES;  
         hideBusy;
        });
    });

-(void)showBusy{
    if(!completed).....
}
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Thanks, I thought that it will be more complicated but it works fine. – neobagram Feb 25 '14 at 8:45
    
It's not, thanks to the magic of blocks :) – Calin Chitu Feb 25 '14 at 8:47

For a jump start:

A possibly solution is to use a one shot timer, which will be started when the operation begins, and fires after the desired duration. The timer's action is to start the busy indicator.

Within the completion handler of the operation, the timer will be invalidated and the busy indicator will be disabled (hidden) if any.

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You can try

[self performSelector:@selector(showIndicator) withObject:nil afterDelay:1.0];

Use some BOOL variable like jobCompleted to indicate whether your job is complete or not. Then

 - (void)showIndicator
{
    if(jobCompleted)return;
    ....
}
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If you have a method to show your activity indicator (let name it -(void)showIndicator) you can do

[self performSelector:@selector(showIndicator) withObject:nil afterDelay:delay];

and cancel it with

[NSObject cancelPreviousPerformRequestsWithTarget:self];
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