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I'm noticing serious performance issues with my application when I started using the data type [bigint] for my stored procedure parameters. The parameter data type for the fast code below is [nvarchar](50). Below is some code that I changed, and this simple call went from < 1 second (fast code) to over 20 seconds (slow code). What could be causing this issue? How can I use [bigint] but maintain performance? I'm using Enterprise Library 5 (Database Application Block) with .NET 4.0.

Before (fast):

            Database db = DatabaseFactory.CreateDatabase("APP");
            DbCommand cmd = db.GetStoredProcCommand("sp_test");
            db.AddInParameter(cmd, "@crud_command", DbType.String, "read");
            db.AddInParameter(cmd, "@network_login", DbType.String, "abc231");
            db.AddInParameter(cmd, "@id_filter", DbType.String, id_filter);
            DataSet ds = db.ExecuteDataSet(cmd);

After (slow):

            Database db = DatabaseFactory.CreateDatabase("APP");
            DbCommand cmd = db.GetStoredProcCommand("sp_test");
            db.AddInParameter(cmd, "@crud_command", DbType.String, "read");
            db.AddInParameter(cmd, "@network_login", DbType.String, "abc231");
            db.AddInParameter(cmd, "@id_filter", DbType.Int64, Convert.ToInt64(id_filter));
            DataSet ds = db.ExecuteDataSet(cmd);
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Your doing a convert, maybe that one takes time? Have you isolated and tried it with and without that parameter conversion? Perhaps you could cast it, could be faster. Also, you could try out "addwithvalue" instead, then you dont have to specify what type your adding to the sql command. – Johan Feb 25 '14 at 8:35

You have to check the type in the db, make sure the type of the parameter is the same as the column you are quering (I guess it is a varchar, not a bigint). If they are different, the compaison will do a convertion, and sql server will not use the indexes (can not optimize).

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