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I'm writing a Shell script and need to check that a terminal app has been installed. I want to use a TRY/CATCH command to do this unless there is a neater way.

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Why not an if else ? –  Thomas Feb 25 at 9:11
    
It might help if you could elaborate what problem you're attempting to solve. Seems that you're not exactly new here, but you still might want to visit the Help Center and see help on how to ask a good question. –  devnull Feb 25 at 9:11
    
That said, it seems that saying help test might help you find the solution to your problem. –  devnull Feb 25 at 9:14
    
try/catch/finally block is not a command, it's a construct –  Benedictus Oct 1 at 13:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Is there a TRY CATCH command in Bash?

No.

Bash doesn't have all luxury as you can find in many programming language and also it's true that bash doesn't have less luxury than other programming language.

There is not really a try/catch in bash but you can achieve a quite similar behavior using && or ||

Using ||

if command1 fails then you will run command2 as follows

command1 || command2

similar using && you can run command2 if command1 successful

Now if you want exact flavor of try/catch then try it

{ # this is my bash try block

    command1 &&
    #save your output

} || { # this is catch block
    # save log for exception 
}

Also bash contain some error handling mechanism also

set -e

It will immediately stop your script if a simple command fails. I think this should have been the default behavior: Since such errors almost always signify something unexpected, it is not really 'sane' to keep executing the following commands.

And also why not if...else. It is your best friend.

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3  
With this, you need to take care that the code for #save your output does not fail, or the "catch" block will still execute. –  chepner Feb 25 at 12:49
    
@chepner yes, you are right. –  Jayesh Feb 26 at 4:16

bash does not abort the running execution in case sth detects an error state (unless you set the -e flag). Programming languages which offer try/catch do this in order to inhibit a "bailing out" because of this special situation (hence typically called "exception").

In the bash, instead, only the command in question will exit with an exit code greater than 0, indicating that error state. You can check for that of course, but since there is no automatic bailing out of anything, a try/catch does not make sense. It is just lacking that context.

You can, however, simulate a bailing out by using sub shells which can terminate at a point you decide:

(
  echo "Do one thing"
  echo "Do another thing"
  if some_condition
  then
    exit 3  # <-- this is our simulated bailing out
  fi
  echo "Do yet another thing"
  echo "And do a last thing"
)   # <-- here we arrive after the simulated bailing out, and $? will be 3 (exit code)
if [ $? = 3 ]
then
  echo "Bail out detected"
fi

Instead of that some_condition with an if you also can just try a command, and in case it fails (has an exit code greater than 0), bail out:

(
  echo "Do one thing"
  echo "Do another thing"
  some_command || exit 3
  echo "Do yet another thing"
  echo "And do a last thing"
)
...

Unfortunately, using this technique you are restricted to 255 different exit codes (1..255) and no decent exception objects can be used.

If you need more information to pass along with your simulated exception, you can use the stdout of the subshells, but that is a bit complicated and maybe another question ;-)

Using the above mentioned -e flag to the shell you can even strip that explicit exit statement:

(
  set -e
  echo "Do one thing"
  echo "Do another thing"
  some_command
  echo "Do yet another thing"
  echo "And do a last thing"
)
...
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And you have traps http://www.tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-Guide/html/sect_12_02.html which is not the same, but other technique you can use for this purpose

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Signals are really only related by a very thin thread to the concept of exceptions and try/catch as they are not part of the normal control flow of a program. But it's okay to mention that here. –  Alfe Feb 26 at 10:49

Based on some answers I found here, I made myself a small helper file to source for my projects:

trycatch.sh

#!/bin/bash

function try()
{
    [[ $- = *e* ]]; SAVED_OPT_E=$?
    set +e
}

function throw()
{
    exit $1
}

function catch()
{
    export ex_code=$?
    (( $SAVED_OPT_E )) && set +e
    return $ex_code
}

function throwErrors()
{
    set -e
}

function ignoreErrors()
{
    set +e
}

here is an example how it looks like in use:

#!/bin/bash
export AnException=100
export AnotherException=101

# start with a try
try
(   # open a subshell !!!
    echo "do something"
    [ someErrorCondition ] && throw $AnException

    echo "do something more"
    executeCommandThatMightFail || throw $AnotherException

    throwErrors # automaticatly end the try block, if command-result is non-null
    echo "now on to something completely different"
    executeCommandThatMightFail

    echo "it's a wonder we came so far"
    executeCommandThatFailsForSure || true # ignore a single failing command

    ignoreErrors # ignore failures of commands until further notice
    executeCommand1ThatFailsForSure
    local result = $(executeCommand2ThatFailsForSure)
    [ result != "expected error" ] && throw $AnException # ok, if it's not an expected error, we want to bail out!
    executeCommand3ThatFailsForSure

    echo "finished"
)
# directly after closing the subshell you need to connect a group to the catch using ||
catch || {
    # now you can handle
    case $ex_code in
        $AnException)
            echo "AnException was thrown"
        ;;
        $AnotherException)
            echo "AnotherException was thrown"
        ;;
        *)
            echo "An unexpected exception was thrown"
            throw $ex_code # you can rethrow the "exception" causing the script to exit if not caught
        ;;
    esac
}
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As everybody says, bash doesn't have a proper language-supported try/catch syntax. You can launch bash with the -e argument or use set -e inside the script to abort the entire bash process if any command has a non-zero exit code. (You can also set +e to temporarily allow failing commands.)

So, one technique to simulate a try/catch block is to launch a sub-process to do the work with -e enabled. Then in the main process, check the return code of the sub-process.

Bash supports heredoc strings, so you don't have to write two separate files to handle this. In the below example, the TRY heredoc will run in a separate bash instance, with -e enabled, so the sub-process will crash if any command returns a non-zero exit code. Then, back in the main process, we can check the return code to handle a catch block.

#!/bin/bash

set +e
bash -e <<TRY
  echo hello
  cd /does/not/exist
  echo world
TRY
if [ $? -ne 0 ]; then
  echo caught exception
fi

It's not a proper language-supported try/catch block, but it may scratch a similar itch for you.

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