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Take the following method, which just returns a map of fields by name:

public static < T > HashMap< String, Field > getFields( Class< T > klass ) {
    HashMap< String, Field > fields = new HashMap< String, Field >();
    for ( Field f : klass.getFields() ) {
        fields.put( f.getName(), f );
    }
    return fields;
}

The method behaves identically if you remove the generic typing in the method signature, except that you get a warning for using a raw type. I've run into other similar things, especially around reflection, where you don't necessarily have the input type. It seems like reflection is just naturally going to have problems with generics, given that reflection is built to let you work with objects when you don't know (or care about) the type.

Aside from just pasting an "@SuppressWarning" on everything, does anyone have any good ideas about more elegant way of handling reflection without being constantly scolded by generics?

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I've had to deal with this before but can't remember off the top of my head, here's a good tutorial on generics from Sun. java.sun.com/j2se/1.5/pdf/generics-tutorial.pdf If no one else answers by the time I get home I'll crack open my old CS2 book and try to help. It's been awhile since I really did java generics. –  Aaron Feb 4 '10 at 16:08
    
Interestingly, the Eclipse compiler is totally fine with your code -- no warning at all. Not the first time that javac and Eclipse don't agree on generics though... –  netzwerg Feb 4 '10 at 16:23
    
You may have some eclipse warnings shut off. I get a "raw type" warning in eclipse. –  Steve B. Feb 4 '10 at 16:30
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about this (you don't need the template parameter T, so you can skip it):

public static HashMap< String, Field > getFields2( Class<?> klass ) {
    HashMap< String, Field > fields = new HashMap< String, Field >();
    for ( Field f : klass.getFields() ) {
        fields.put( f.getName(), f );
    }
    return fields;
}
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Effective Java, Chapter 5 (Generics):

  • Don't use raw types in new code
  • Favor generic methods

So - don't remove the type parameter.

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+1 for succinct answer. –  fastcodejava Feb 4 '10 at 16:16
1  
The issue is more that you're required to specify a type parameter that doesn't serve a purpose. –  Steve B. Feb 4 '10 at 16:29
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