Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A direct cut and paste of the following algorithm:

def msort[T](less: (T, T) => Boolean)
            (xs: List[T]): List[T] = {
  def merge(xs: List[T], ys: List[T]): List[T] =
    (xs, ys) match {
      case (Nil, _) => ys
      case (_, Nil) => xs
      case (x :: xs1, y :: ys1) =>
        if (less(x, y)) x :: merge(xs1, ys)
        else y :: merge(xs, ys1)
    }
  val n = xs.length / 2
  if (n == 0) xs
  else {
    val (ys, zs) = xs splitAt n
     merge(msort(less)(ys), msort(less)(zs))
  }
}

causes a StackOverflowError on 5000 long lists.

Is there any way to optimize this so that this doesn't occur?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It is doing this because it isn't tail-recursive. You can fix this by either using a non-strict collection, or by making it tail-recursive.

The latter solution goes like this:

def msort[T](less: (T, T) => Boolean) 
            (xs: List[T]): List[T] = { 
  def merge(xs: List[T], ys: List[T], acc: List[T]): List[T] = 
    (xs, ys) match { 
      case (Nil, _) => ys.reverse ::: acc 
      case (_, Nil) => xs.reverse ::: acc
      case (x :: xs1, y :: ys1) => 
        if (less(x, y)) merge(xs1, ys, x :: acc) 
        else merge(xs, ys1, y :: acc) 
    } 
  val n = xs.length / 2 
  if (n == 0) xs 
  else { 
    val (ys, zs) = xs splitAt n 
    merge(msort(less)(ys), msort(less)(zs), Nil).reverse
  } 
} 

Using non-strictness involves either passing parameters by-name, or using non-strict collections such as Stream. The following code uses Stream just to prevent stack overflow, and List elsewhere:

def msort[T](less: (T, T) => Boolean) 
            (xs: List[T]): List[T] = { 
  def merge(left: List[T], right: List[T]): Stream[T] = (left, right) match {
    case (x :: xs, y :: ys) if less(x, y) => Stream.cons(x, merge(xs, right))
    case (x :: xs, y :: ys) => Stream.cons(y, merge(left, ys))
    case _ => if (left.isEmpty) right.toStream else left.toStream
  }
  val n = xs.length / 2 
  if (n == 0) xs 
  else { 
    val (ys, zs) = xs splitAt n 
    merge(msort(less)(ys), msort(less)(zs)).toList
  } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about trying to make it tail recursive, then saw quite a lot of info claiming that the JVM isn't that amenable and doesn't always optimize tail recursion. Is there some sort of guideline for when this succeeds? –  user44242 Feb 4 '10 at 20:00
    
The JVM doesn't, so the Scala compiler will do it for you. It only does under certain requirements: it must be self-recursion (ie, f calling g, and g calling f won't work), it must be tail recursion, of course (the recursive call must always be the last thing on that code path), on methods it must be either final or private. In the example, because merge is defined inside msort, instead of being defined on a class or object, it is effectively private. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 4 '10 at 20:29
3  
I think it might be worth mentioning here that msort itself is not tail recursive, but merge is. For anyone only convinced by the compiler, add @tailrec to the definition of merge, and you will notice it's getting accepted as a tail recursive function, just as Daniel outlined. –  Wilfred Springer Jan 29 '11 at 19:40
    
Now, having said that, it's also important to note that msort not being tail-recursive is not going to be a real problem. It will recurse only log2(n) levels deep, with n being the number of elements in the list getting passed in. So for a list of 5000 elements, msort will recurse only 13 levels deep. –  Wilfred Springer Jan 29 '11 at 19:47
    
@Wilfred merge cannot be tail recursive, because this isn't a tail call: x :: merge(xs1, ys). A bug was found with tailrec code, but it doesn't look like it should apply here, so I find it curious that tailrec isn't complaining. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 30 '11 at 2:10

Just in case Daniel's solutions didn't make it clear enough, the problem is that merge's recursion is as deep as the length of the list, and it's not tail-recursion so it can't be converted into iteration.

Scala can convert Daniel's tail-recursive merge solution into something approximately equivalent to this:

def merge(xs: List[T], ys: List[T]): List[T] = {
  var acc:List[T] = Nil
  var decx = xs
  var decy = ys
  while (!decx.isEmpty || !decy.isEmpty) {
    (decx, decy) match { 
      case (Nil, _) => { acc = decy.reverse ::: acc ; decy = Nil }
      case (_, Nil) => { acc = decx.reverse ::: acc ; decx = Nil }
      case (x :: xs1, y :: ys1) => 
        if (less(x, y)) { acc = x :: acc ; decx = xs1 }
        else { acc = y :: acc ; decy = ys1 }
    }
  }
  acc.reverse
}

but it keeps track of all the variables for you.

(A tail-recursive method is one where the method only calls itself to get a complete answer to pass back; it never calls itself and then does something with the result before passing it back. Also, tail-recursion can't be used if the method might be polymorphic, so it generally only works in objects or with classes marked final.)

share|improve this answer
    
Should that last acc actually be acc.reverse ? If you were using this as a standalone merge function there should be, but maybe there's something about msort's usage I don't get. –  timday Jan 13 '13 at 15:37
1  
@timday - Right. Fixed. –  Rex Kerr Jan 13 '13 at 17:25

Just playing around with scala's TailCalls (trampolining support), which I suspect wasn't around when this question was originally posed. Here's a recursive immutable version of the merge in Rex's answer.

import scala.util.control.TailCalls._

def merge[T <% Ordered[T]](x:List[T],y:List[T]):List[T] = {

  def build(s:List[T],a:List[T],b:List[T]):TailRec[List[T]] = {
    if (a.isEmpty) {
      done(b.reverse ::: s)
    } else if (b.isEmpty) {
      done(a.reverse ::: s)
    } else if (a.head<b.head) {
      tailcall(build(a.head::s,a.tail,b))
    } else {
      tailcall(build(b.head::s,a,b.tail))
    }
  }

  build(List(),x,y).result.reverse
}

Runs just as fast as the mutable version on big List[Long]s on Scala 2.9.1 on 64bit OpenJDK (Debian/Squeeze amd64 on an i7).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.