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I am writing a chess engine and I require an efficient way of merging multiple lists into a singular list ordered by the smallest value.

Each list is quintessentially a group of chess pieces that are already ordered in perfect attack order. For example I have a White Queen on a2, White Bishop on b3, White Rook on f1 and White Rook on f2. Now say I have a Black Pawn on f7 then all four White pieces are converging on the f7 square from two different discrete directions - North East (Queen & Bishop) and North (Rooks).

These two groups would be ordered as follows:

Group A) 1st - Bishop (b3); 2nd - Queen (a2)
Group B) 1st - Rook (f2); 2nd - Rook (f1)

Now using the points system below I would expect both lists to be merged into a single list in the following order (lowest value to highest value): Bishop (b3), Rook (f2), Rook (f1) and finally Queen (a2).

Queen = 900 pts
Rook = 500 pts
Bishop = 375 pts
Knight = 350 pts
Pawn = 100 pts

Some code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace SO_22015528
{
  public enum eRayDirection
  {
    North,
    NorthEast,
    East,
    SouthEast,
    South,
    SouthWest,
    West,
    NorthWest
  }

  public enum ePieceType
  {
    Empty = 0,
    Pawn = 1,
    Knight = 2,
    Bishop = 3,
    Rook = 4,
    Queen = 5,
    King = 6
  }

  public struct BoardPosition : IComparable<BoardPosition>
  {
    public int File;
    public int Rank;
    public int Square;

    public BoardPosition( int square )
    {
      Square = square;
      File = square % 7;
      Rank = 8 - ( square >> 3 );
    }

    public static Boolean operator >( BoardPosition b1, BoardPosition b2 )
    {
      return ( b1.Rank > b2.Rank ) || ( b1.Rank == b2.Rank && b1.File < b2.File );
    }

    public static Boolean operator <( BoardPosition b1, BoardPosition b2 )
    {
      return ( b1.Rank < b2.Rank ) || ( b1.Rank == b2.Rank && b1.File > b2.File );
    }

    public int CompareTo( BoardPosition obj )
    {
      if ( this < obj ) return 1;
      else if ( this > obj ) return -1;
      else return 0;
    }
  }

  public class ChessPiece
  {
    public int Value { get; set; }
    public ePieceType Type { get; set; }
    public int Square { get; set; }
    public BoardPosition XY
    {
      get
      {
        return new BoardPosition( this.Square );
      }
    }
    public ChessPiece( ePieceType type, int value, int square )
    {
      Value = value;
      Type = type;
      Square = square;
    }
  }

  public class Constraint
  {
    public ChessPiece Piece { get; set; }
    public eRayDirection Ray { get; set; }
    public Constraint( ChessPiece piece, eRayDirection ray )
    {
      Piece = piece;
      Ray = ray;
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
      return String.Format( "{0} {1} {2}", Piece.Square, Piece.Type, Ray );
    }
  }

}

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace SO_22015528
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
      // test code
      ChessPiece a2 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Queen, 900, 48 );
      ChessPiece b3 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Bishop, 375, 41 );
      ChessPiece f1 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Rook, 500, 61 );
      ChessPiece f2 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Rook, 500, 53 );

      // This just simulates pieces that attack on the f7 square.
      List<Constraint> f7 = new List<Constraint>();
      f7.Add( new Constraint( b3, eRayDirection.NorthEast ) );
      f7.Add( new Constraint( a2, eRayDirection.NorthEast ) );
      f7.Add( new Constraint( f1, eRayDirection.North ) );
      f7.Add( new Constraint( f2, eRayDirection.North ) );

      // Get all positive ray directions ( use to simplify LINQ orderby )
      List<eRayDirection> positiveRayDirections = new List<eRayDirection>();
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.North );
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.NorthEast );
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.NorthWest );
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.West );

      var groups = f7
        .GroupBy( g => g.Ray )
        .Select( a =>
        new
        {
          Key = a.Key,
          Results = positiveRayDirections.Contains( a.Key ) ? a.OrderBy( x => x.Piece.XY ).ToList() : a.OrderByDescending( x => x.Piece.XY ).ToList()
        } ).ToList();

              // The groups object returns two discrete groups here; 
              // NorthEast containing 2 entries (Bishop & Queen) and North 
              // also containing to entries (Rook x 2).
      List<Constraint> attackOrder = new List<Constraint>();

      List<Int32> groupIndicies = new List<Int32>( groups.Count() );
      for ( int n = 0; n < groups.Count(); n++ )
        groupIndicies.Add( 0 );

      while ( true )
      {
        Int32 value = Int32.MaxValue;
        Int32 groupIndex = -1;

        for ( int n = 0; n < groups.Count(); n++ )
        {
          var g = groups[ n ];
          int gIndex = groupIndicies[ n ];

          if ( gIndex < g.Results.Count && g.Results[ gIndex ].Piece.Value < value )
          {
            value = g.Results[ gIndex ].Piece.Value;
            groupIndex = n;
          }
        }

        if ( groupIndex < 0 )
          break;

        attackOrder.Add( groups[ groupIndex ].Results[ groupIndicies[ groupIndex ] ] );

        groupIndicies[ groupIndex ]++;

      }

              foreach ( var ao in attackOrder )
                  Console.WriteLine( ao.ToString() );

      Console.ReadKey();
    }
  }
}

I do not think the last bit is very efficient and I would appreciate it if someone could find a much simpler way of doing this.

share|improve this question
    
As far as this is not a too simple code (neither a too simple request), executing it seems required to get a proper grasp. Can you please correct the small bugs which avoid the posted code to compile? –  varocarbas Feb 25 '14 at 14:19
2  
Your question is difficult to understand, but it sounds like you want to merge two sorted lists? Any sorted list structure will work for you; or simply merge the lists and call .Sort() on it. A priority-queue might also work. Also, small aside: bishops are not worth more than knights –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 25 '14 at 14:30
    
@varocarbas I have posted amended code that you should now be able to compile into your own project. –  Intrepid Feb 25 '14 at 14:50
    
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft I agree that bishops are not worth more than knights, but this is just a test. My chess engine will be altering the values of the bishops making them worth more or less as the game progresses. As for the main subject, yes I want to merge two lists, but it is more of a specialist merge so just adding two lists together and sorting won't do because the merge will still need to honour the attack order of the pieces. If this is what you mean by a priority queue then how would I goo about doing this? –  Intrepid Feb 25 '14 at 14:54

4 Answers 4

Order each list individually using quicksort and then sort by insert into the final list.

Order the lists individually.
Create the empty Final list.

do
{
   consider the first item in each of the sorted lists and find the highest ranking candidate.
   remove the item from its sorted list and add it to the final list.
} 
until all of the sorted lists are empty.
share|improve this answer
    
This is basically MergeSort. –  Nate Diamond Feb 25 '14 at 17:44

Plain and simple. Just invoke the SelectMany() on the groups and apply OrderByDescending() based on the Constraint.Piece.Value. See the following code:

List<Constraint> attackOrder = groups.SelectMany(x => x.Results).OrderByDescending(x => x.Piece.Value).ToList();

So the updated version of your last code snippet is given below:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace SO_22015528
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
      // test code
      ChessPiece a2 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Queen, 900, 48 );
      ChessPiece b3 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Bishop, 375, 41 );
      ChessPiece f1 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Rook, 500, 61 );
      ChessPiece f2 = new ChessPiece( ePieceType.Rook, 500, 53 );

      // This just simulates pieces that attack on the f7 square.
      List<Constraint> f7 = new List<Constraint>();
      f7.Add( new Constraint( b3, eRayDirection.NorthEast ) );
      f7.Add( new Constraint( a2, eRayDirection.NorthEast ) );
      f7.Add( new Constraint( f1, eRayDirection.North ) );
      f7.Add( new Constraint( f2, eRayDirection.North ) );

      // Get all positive ray directions ( use to simplify LINQ orderby )
      List<eRayDirection> positiveRayDirections = new List<eRayDirection>();
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.North );
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.NorthEast );
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.NorthWest );
      positiveRayDirections.Add( eRayDirection.West );

      var groups = f7
        .GroupBy( g => g.Ray )
        .Select( a =>
        new
        {
          Key = a.Key,
          Results = positiveRayDirections.Contains( a.Key ) ? a.OrderBy( x => x.Piece.XY ).ToList() : a.OrderByDescending( x => x.Piece.XY ).ToList()
        } ).ToList();

              // The groups object returns two discrete groups here; 
              // NorthEast containing 2 entries (Bishop & Queen) and North 
              // also containing to entries (Rook x 2).
      List<Constraint> attackOrder = groups.SelectMany(x => x.Results).OrderByDescending(x => x.Piece.Value).ToList();

      foreach ( var ao in attackOrder )
          Console.WriteLine( ao.ToString() );

      Console.ReadKey();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for this tricky question! –  Wasif Hossain Feb 25 '14 at 17:37

Think about how a person would implement this: he would look at all the incoming lists and pull off the best one. Then he would rinse and repeat until all of the incoming lists are depleted.

/// <summary>
/// Merges the incoming sorted streams of items into a single sorted stream of items, using the provided comparison function
/// </summary>
public static IEnumerable<T> MergeMany<T>(Comparison<T> comparison, params IEnumerable<T>[] collections)
{
  var liveEnumerators = new PriorityQueue<IEnumerator<T>>((e1, e2) => comparison(e1.Current, e2.Current));

  // start each enumerator and add them to the queue, sorting by the current values.
  // Discard any enumerator that has no item
  foreach (var coll in collections)
  {
    var enumerator = coll.GetEnumerator();
    if (enumerator.MoveNext())
      liveEnumerators.Push(enumerator);
  }

  while (liveEnumerators.Any())
  {
    // pull an enumerator off the queue and yield its current item
    var enumerator = liveEnumerators.Pop();
    yield return enumerator.Current;

    // if it has more items, throw it back on the queue, sorting using its new current item.
    if (enumerator.MoveNext())
      liveEnumerators.Push(enumerator);
  }
}

This code keeps the list of enumerators, sorted on the Current item identified by each. To work with this you would provide your list of lists, and a function describing which item is bigger than which. So if you started with two collections, one for NorthEast containing [bishop, queen] and another for North containing [rook, rook], then when you Merged these two lists you would emerge with [bishop, rook, rook, queen]. Note that this code honours the original order of your incoming lists.

Note also that you'll need to find your own PriorityQueue class which can take and use the comparison function.

share|improve this answer
    
Just tried this and while it does work when I pass in the groups as separate parameters, e.g. var results = MergeMany<dynamic>( ( a, b ) => { if ( a.Piece.Value > b.Piece.Value ) return 1; else if ( a.Piece.Value < b.Piece.Value ) return -1; else return 0; }, groups[0].Results, groups[1].Results ) ); it doesn't work when I just pass in groups which contains all the groups in a single object. Is there any way I can make this work without having to separate out groups into separate arrays? –  Intrepid Feb 26 '14 at 8:53
    
The problem is that the call interprets groups as a single IEnumerable<IGrouping<...>> which isn't what you want; what you're trying to do is interpret groups as the collection of IEnumerables itself (IGrouping<...> is itself enumerable). Furthermore you're trying to get at the things trapped in the Results section of each group. Use groups.Select(g => g.Results). –  CSJ Feb 26 '14 at 14:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have decided to stick with my original code after discovering that LINQ was far too slow for my needs. After replacing all LINQ code with loops and iterators I managed to increase engine performance by 12x.

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