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Is it possible to make the elements within a WPF toolbar have a HorizontalAlignment of Right?

<ToolBar Height="38" VerticalAlignment="Top" Grid.Row="1">
    <Button HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="50" VerticalAlignment="Stretch"/>
    <Button HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="50" VerticalAlignment="Stretch"/>
    <ComboBox Width="120" HorizontalAlignment="Right"/>
</ToolBar>

I've tried adding the elements inside into a Grid and assigning the ColumnDefinitions to Left/Right as well. I have also tried a StackPanel. No matter what I try I can't seem to get the ComboBox to be "anchored" on the right side of the Toolbar.

UPDATE:

<DockPanel LastChildFill="True">

Doesn't work, It will not fill the ToolBar element like it would a normal element.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Further investigation showed that in order to do this I need to set the width of a Grid within the ToolBar, or as Chris Nicol said, a DockPanel within the ToolBar dynamically to that of the width of the Toolbar using RelativeSource.

However, this does not feel like a clean solution. It is quite complicated to get the Toolbar to update correctly on resizing. So instead I found somewhat of a hack that looks, and operates cleaner.

<ToolBar Height="38" VerticalAlignment="Top" Grid.Row="1">
    <Button HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="50" VerticalAlignment="Stretch"/>
    <Button HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="50" VerticalAlignment="Stretch"/>
</ToolBar>

<ComboBox Margin="0,0,15,0" Width="120" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Grid.Row="1"/>

Since all of my elements are on a Grid, I can place my ComboBox on top of the ToolBar by assigning it's Grid.Row to the same row as the toolbar. After setting my Margins to pull the ComboBox over slightly as not to interfere with looks, it operates as needed with no bugs. Since the only other way I found to do this was setting a DockPanel/Grid's Width property dynamically, I actually feel like this is the cleaner more efficient way to do it.

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1  
Actually I find this a brilliant (and very neat) solution. I've been plagued by this issue for so long. Thanks! –  pongba Jul 22 '10 at 7:42
    
This is really a brilliant idea. Thanks! –  miliu Nov 11 '12 at 4:06
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Have you tried using a DockPanel that fills the toolbar, then you can dock the ComboBox to the right.

Remember that with a dockpanel the sequence you put the items in is very important.

HTH

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How would you fill the toolbar with a DockPanel? I tried and can only do it dynamically.. Unless there is something I am unaware of, this is the problem with the ToolBar. Which is why this won't work for me. –  jsmith Feb 4 '10 at 21:54
    
just super busy with work at the moment, I'll post a solution this weekend that should feel a little cleaner. –  Chris Nicol Feb 5 '10 at 18:10
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My solution to this was to create a label control with a "spring" like ability, so that it would fill the empty void with between the buttons on the toolbar, thus "right aligning" the toolbar's combobox (or any other control that needs "right-aligned).

To do this, I created a WidthConverter, that would take the Actual Width of the ToolBar Control, and then subtract the the space needed needed to right align the combobox.:

public class WidthConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return Math.Max(System.Convert.ToDouble(value) - System.Convert.ToDouble(parameter), 0.0);
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Then, I added a label control to the toolbar, placed to the left of the combobox you need right aligned. Bind the label's Width to the toolbar's ActualWidth and apply the WidthConverter:

<Label Width="{Binding Converter={StaticResource WidthConverter}, ElementName=toolBar1, Path=ActualWidth, ConverterParameter=50}" />

You will need to adjust the ConverterParameter to your specific needs until you get the desired "right align". A higher number provides more space for the combobox, whereas a lower number provides less space.

Using this solution, the label will automatically resize whenever your toolbar resizes, making it appear that you have right aligned your combobox.

There are two great benefit to this solution compared to adding a grid to the toolbar. The first is that if you need to use buttons on the toolbar, you won't lose the toolbar button styling. The second is that the overflow will work as expected if the toolbar length is reduced through window resizing. Individual buttons will go into the overflow as required. If the buttons are put into a a grid then the grid is put into the overflow taking all buttons with it.

XAML of it in use:

<ToolBarPanel>
    <ToolBar Name="toolBar1">
        <Button>
            <Image Source="save.png"/>
        </Button>
    <Label Width="{Binding Converter={StaticResource Converters.WidthConverter},
                  ElementName=toolBar1,
                  Path=ActualWidth,
                  ConverterParameter=231}" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" ToolBar.OverflowMode="Never"/>
    <Button>
        <Image Source="open.png"/>
    </Button>
</ToolBar>

If you desire to always keep the last button on the toolbar, say a help button that you always want visible, add the attribute ToolBar.OverflowMode="Never" to its element.

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You solution does seem more clean. However, I cannot make it work for me. Can you provide a complete sample for a toolbar with one button on the left and another on the right? –  miliu Jun 8 '11 at 12:46
    
Updated the answer to include an example. The first button will left aligned, and the second button will be right aligned. You will need to adjust the Converter Parameter to get the desired result. –  PocketDews Jun 15 '11 at 5:11
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This is how I did it:

I created a style for the toolbar

    <Style x:Key="{x:Type ToolBar}" TargetType="{x:Type ToolBar}">
    <Setter Property="SnapsToDevicePixels" Value="true" />
    <Setter Property="OverridesDefaultStyle" Value="true" />
    <Setter Property="HorizontalAlignment" Value="Stretch"/>
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type ToolBar}">
                <Grid Background="{StaticResource ToolGridBackground}">
                    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                        <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/>
                        <ColumnDefinition Width="*"/>
                        <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/>
                    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                    <Image Grid.Column="0" Style="{StaticResource LogoImage}"/>
                    <ToolBarPanel Grid.Column="2" x:Name="PART_ToolBarPanel" IsItemsHost="true" Margin="0,1,2,2" Orientation="Horizontal"/>
                </Grid>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

The important part is :

<Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                        <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/>
                        <ColumnDefinition Width="*"/>
                        <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/>
                    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

And

<ToolBarPanel Grid.Column="2"/>

With this, your buttons will be right aligned

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This works, but it is bad because we completely replacing template of ToolBar and thus losing default styling. –  diimdeep Jun 17 '13 at 10:58
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I'm not very satisfied with the "WidthConverter" solution because I got some dynamic elements at end. Further search led me to here, which seems to be working perfect for me. Here is my code sample in case you are interested:

<ToolBar Name="toolBar">
    <DockPanel Width="{Binding Path=ActualWidth, RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type ToolBarPanel}}}">
        <DockPanel.Resources>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type Button}" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Static ToolBar.ButtonStyleKey}}"></Style>
        </DockPanel.Resources>
        <Button x:Name="btnRefresh" ToolTip="Refresh" Click="btnRefresh_Click">
            <Image Margin="2 0" Source="/Resources/refresh.ico" Height="16" Width="16"/>
        </Button>
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" HorizontalAlignment="Right">
            <Image Margin="2 0" Source="/Resources/Help.ico" Height="16" Width="16"/>
            <TextBlock Text="Help" Margin="2 0" VerticalAlignment="Center"/>
        </StackPanel>
    </DockPanel>
</ToolBar>
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Ah, this approach doesn't work perfectly when the window is resized. –  miliu Nov 3 '12 at 19:27
    
This doesn't work because all toolbar buttons disappear if you shrink the window. Otherwise, it works perfect. So, it would be great if there is a minor tweak to this approach to make it work. –  miliu May 7 '13 at 1:58
    
Okay, I found another post at social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wpf/thread/… (from dhbusch2) which really works perfect for me, except that I have to apply a style to button like Style="{StaticResource {x:Static ToolBar.ButtonStyleKey}}" –  miliu May 7 '13 at 2:22
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    <ToolBar Width="100" VerticalAlignment="Top" >
        <ToolBar.Resources>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type ToolBarPanel}">
                <Setter Property="Orientation" Value="Vertical"/>
            </Style>
        </ToolBar.Resources>

        <DockPanel>
            <ToolBarPanel Orientation="Horizontal" >
                <Button>A</Button>
                <Button>B</Button>
            </ToolBarPanel>
            <Button DockPanel.Dock="Right" HorizontalAlignment="Right">C</Button>
        </DockPanel>
    </ToolBar>

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