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I'm trying to develop an app that sends email, and our internal network is locked down pretty tight, so I can't relay using our internal mail servers.

Has anyone ever used something like no-ip.com? Are there any other alternatives?

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What exactly are you trying to do? –  SLaks Feb 4 '10 at 17:59
    
User submits a form, we send out a confirmation email. Not rocket science. –  chris Feb 4 '10 at 18:10
    
Write your own SMTP server that runs on your PC. –  user195488 Feb 4 '10 at 18:27
    
@Changeling, do you think he should do that before or after reinventing the wheel? –  Steven Sudit Feb 4 '10 at 19:31
1  
Wouldn't make a difference, the problem is that port 25 is blocked. –  chris Feb 4 '10 at 19:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you just need to check that the e-mails are being sent to the correct addresses and with the correct contents, the easiest way is to use a drop folder by editing the app or web.config file:

  <system.net>
    <mailSettings>
      <smtp deliveryMethod="SpecifiedPickupDirectory" from="me@myorg.com">
        <specifiedPickupDirectory pickupDirectoryLocation="C:\TestMailDrop"/>
      </smtp>
    </mailSettings>
  </system.net>

This will result in the e-mails being created as files in the specified directory. You can even then load the files and verify them as part of a unit test.

(As codekaizen points out, this can also be done in code if you don't mind modifying the code/hardcoding the drop folder and having the behavior differing in debug/release mode.)

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+1 for making the best of a bad situation. –  Steven Sudit Feb 4 '10 at 18:26
    
sounds like the best option for now - that, plus it's obviously time to put my resume up on careers.stackoverflow.com :) –  chris Feb 4 '10 at 19:25
    
I'm going to restrict myself to technical advice here, instead of career advice. But, yes, if your employer wants you to do something and then works to stop you from doing it, you've got a problem. –  Steven Sudit Feb 4 '10 at 20:50
    
+0 except as a short term trick with non-automated testing, this doesnt end up very workable, esp with an absolute path. Even if you have a relative one, you want to a) stop it overflowing b) clean it so you can be sure you're not looking at stale files –  Ruben Bartelink Aug 10 '12 at 11:33
    
Easily solved with a test setup and clean up task to clean the directory –  Uriah Blatherwick Aug 4 '13 at 21:25

I would agree with the above...setup your own test SMTP server, and use that for your testing.

Here's some info to get you on the right track:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/e4cf06f5-9a36-474b-ba78-3f287a2b88f2.mspx?mfr=true

http://www.cmsconnect.com/praetor/WebHelpG2/Chapter_2_-_Pre-installation_considerations/Configuring_the_SMTP_Server.htm

http://service1.symantec.com/support/ent-gate.nsf/docid/2007241920754398

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+1 for providing reference. –  Steven Sudit Feb 4 '10 at 18:11

You can save the email to disk:

#if DEBUG
smtpClient.PickupDirectoryLocation = "\\Path\\to\\save\\folder";
smtpClient.DeliveryMethod = SmtpDeliveryMethod.SpecifiedPickupDirectory;
smtpClient.Send(msg);
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
This works but I'm more comfortable with the app.config solution, since it's not tied to debug or release builds. –  Steven Sudit Feb 4 '10 at 20:29
    
Yea, that's the better way... I had just forgot how to do the config trick. –  codekaizen Feb 4 '10 at 21:37
1  
+1 You dont want hardwired paths in a config file or it'll be a nightmare to maintain. You should be creating a temporary directory fixture, wiping it down after tests and asserting against its contents –  Ruben Bartelink Aug 10 '12 at 11:22
    
See stackoverflow.com/a/11900755/11635 –  Ruben Bartelink Aug 10 '12 at 11:30

Riffing from @codekaizen, using AutoFixture.xUnit [which is available as an XUnit package by that name]:-

    [Theory, AutoData]
    public static void ShouldSendWithCorrectValues( string anonymousFrom, string anonymousRecipients, string anonymousSubject, string anonymousBody )
    {
        anonymousFrom += "@b.com";
        anonymousRecipients += "@c.com";

        using ( var tempDir = new TemporaryDirectoryFixture() )
        {
            var capturingSmtpClient = new CapturingSmtpClientFixture( tempDir.DirectoryPath );
            var sut = new EmailSender( capturingSmtpClient.SmtpClient );

            sut.Send( anonymousFrom, anonymousRecipients, anonymousSubject, anonymousBody );
            string expectedSingleFilename = capturingSmtpClient.EnumeratePickedUpFiles().Single();
            var result = File.ReadAllText( expectedSingleFilename );

            Assert.Contains( "From: " + anonymousFrom, result );
            Assert.Contains( "To: " + anonymousRecipients, result );
            Assert.Contains( "Subject: " + anonymousSubject, result );
            Assert.Contains( anonymousBody, result );
        }
    }

CapturingSmtpClientFixture is only used in a test context-

    class CapturingSmtpClientFixture
    {
        readonly string _path;
        readonly SmtpClient _smtpClient;

        public CapturingSmtpClientFixture( string path )
        {
            _path = path;
            _smtpClient = new SmtpClient { DeliveryMethod = SmtpDeliveryMethod.SpecifiedPickupDirectory, PickupDirectoryLocation = _path };
        }

        public SmtpClient SmtpClient
        {
            get { return _smtpClient; }
        }

        public IEnumerable<string> EnumeratePickedUpFiles()
        {
            return Directory.EnumerateFiles( _path );
        }
    }

All you need to do then is make sure your actual code supplies an SmtpClient that has been wired up with parameters appropriate to the live SMTP server.

(For completeness, here is TemporaryDirectoryFixture):-

public class TemporaryDirectoryFixture : IDisposable
{
    readonly string _directoryPath;

    public TemporaryDirectoryFixture()
    {
        string randomDirectoryName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension( Path.GetRandomFileName() );

        _directoryPath = Path.Combine( Path.GetTempPath(), randomDirectoryName );

        Directory.CreateDirectory( DirectoryPath );
    }

    public string DirectoryPath
    {
        get { return _directoryPath; }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        try
        {
            if ( Directory.Exists( _directoryPath ) )
                Directory.Delete( _directoryPath, true );
        }
        catch ( IOException )
        {
            // Give other process a chance to release their handles
            // see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/329355/cannot-delete-directory-with-directory-deletepath-true/1703799#1703799
            Thread.Sleep( 0 );
            try
            {
                Directory.Delete( _directoryPath, true );
            }
            catch
            {
                var longDelayS = 2;
                try
                {
                    // This time we'll have to be _really_ patient
                    Thread.Sleep( TimeSpan.FromSeconds( longDelayS ) );
                    Directory.Delete( _directoryPath, true );
                }
                catch ( Exception ex )
                {
                    throw new Exception( @"Could not delete " + GetType() + @" directory: """ + _directoryPath + @""" due to locking, even after " + longDelayS + " seconds", ex );
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

and a skeleton EmailSender:

public class EmailSender
{
    readonly SmtpClient _smtpClient;

    public EmailSender( SmtpClient smtpClient )
    {
        if ( smtpClient == null )
            throw new ArgumentNullException( "smtpClient" );

        _smtpClient = smtpClient;
    }

    public void Send( string from, string recipients, string subject, string body )
    {
        _smtpClient.Send( from, recipients, subject, body );
    }
}
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The usual answer is to run SMTP locally under IIS, but you need to be careful about who you're sending to. It might actually be better to send to your usual SMTP server and target only accounts within your domain.

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Can't even do that, unfortunately. –  chris Feb 4 '10 at 18:12
    
Wow. Ok, then technophile's answer is probably best. –  Steven Sudit Feb 4 '10 at 18:23

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