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Assuming I have an existing app with the following models:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :locations, :through => :location_users
end

class Location < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users, :through => :location_users
end

How do I go about converting this has_many to a has_one association like below, as far as migrations, trimming records of people with multiple locations, and anything else I missed? Are there any shortcuts to do this conversion?

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :location
end

class Location < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users
end

EDIT: User belongs to one and only one location

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1  
Are you sure you want to have the locations table store the primary key of user_id? Or should it be that the users table stores a single location_id (i.e. a user will belong to one and only one location)? –  carlosramireziii Feb 25 at 21:07
1  
Wouldn't it make more sense to have User belong_to :location and Location has_many :users? ... Yeah, what carlosramireziii said. –  Coenwulf Feb 25 at 21:09
    
y'all correct, that's a typo in my logic. I'll edit it now. –  konyak Feb 25 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No Shortcuts.

Write a migration to add location_id to users table

class AddLocationIdToUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_column :users, :location_id, :integer
  end
end

And you can write another migration to populate the location_id for the existing users. For eg, if you want to populate the first location_id for the user in the locations_users table

class PopulateLocationIdOnUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    #executing direct query to speed up the operation
    execute("update users set location_id = (select location_id from locations_users where locations_users.user_id = users.id limit 1)")
  end

  def down
    execute("update users set location_id = null")
  end
end

And another migration to drop locations_users table

class DropLocationsUsersTable < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    drop_table :locations_users
  end

  def down
    create_table :locations_users do |t|
     #columns
    end
  end
end

You can also have a single migration to do all the three steps too.

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Sorry, could you please revise your answer? I just made an edit where User belongs to one and only one location –  konyak Feb 25 at 21:15
    
@ChaseT.: Modified the answer –  Vimsha Feb 25 at 21:26
    
Thanks, I just realized that the last migration is irreversible. Might want to add raise ActiveRecord::IrreversibleMigration, "Can't recover the deleted data" at the end of the down method of DropLocationsUsersTable migration. –  konyak Feb 25 at 21:35
    
You can't reverse the data. But you can still create the schema so your code doesn't throw up when you revert back to a older version –  Vimsha Feb 25 at 21:43

There isn't really an easy way around this. You're going to have to do a lot of manually work from my experience. This is how I went about it:

  1. Write a migration to add user_id to the locations table.

  2. Run the migration

  3. Add the has_one relation code. (like you have above)

    class User < ActiveRecord::Base
      has_one :location
    end
    
    class Location < ActiveRecord::Base
     belongs_to :user
    end
    
  4. Either write a migrations to convert all the existing data over. (e.g. location.user = location.users.first). But it might be better in this case to write a rake task because this will only happen once and it will need to relay on your has_many relationship code to exist. So your migration would be invalid once you remove the has_many code.

  5. Run your rake task

  6. Remove the has_many code and join table.

After doing all that it should all work. Others might have a better way but this is how I did it.

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