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Maybe the answer should be obvious, but I am a little stuck.

My data looks something like this:

> df <- data.frame(person = c("A", "B", "C"), start = c("2014-01-01", "2014-01-02", "2014-01-03"), stop = c("2014-01-05", "2014-01-06", "2014-01-04") )
> df
  person       start       stop
1      A  2014-01-01 2014-01-05
2      B  2014-01-02 2014-01-06
3      C  2014-01-03 2014-01-04

Ultimately I want to plot the total number of people doing an activity on a given day but would settle for just tallying the number per day (i.e. tallying the total number of occurrences of each date when the start and stop dates are known). For the data above, this is the answer I am looking for:

      Date  Tally
2014-01-01  1
2014-01-02  2
2014-01-03  3
2014-01-04  3
2014-01-05  2
2014-01-06  1

One way I have tried is to use seq() to generate all dates but this does not seem to work for start/stop dates of length >1:

seq(df$start, df$stop, length = "1 day") ## Does not work

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Away could be:

as.data.frame(table(unlist(apply(df[-1], 1, 
        function(x) as.character(seq(as.Date(x[1], "%Y-%m-%d"), 
                                     as.Date(x[2], "%Y-%m-%d"), "1 day"))))))
        Var1 Freq
1 2014-01-01    1
2 2014-01-02    2
3 2014-01-03    3
4 2014-01-04    3
5 2014-01-05    2
6 2014-01-06    1

Since you're looking for efficiency, this same answer could be sped up by avoiding some bottlenecks. First, notice that as.Date is called each time in the apply loop. This is because calling it once, before looping, won't have any effect since apply coerces to matrix and therefore the dates are coerced to character, so seq will produce an error. Second, you could avoid the overhead of using seq's method for class "Date". And third, you want the difference in days. These all are encouraging to turn dates into integer and operate on class "numeric".

f1 = function() {  #keeping dates
  as.data.frame(table(unlist(apply(df[-1], 1, 
       function(x) as.character(seq(as.Date(x[1], "%Y-%m-%d"), 
                                    as.Date(x[2], "%Y-%m-%d"), "1 day"))))))
}                                     
f2 = function() {  #using numeric
  df$start = as.numeric(as.Date(df$start, "%Y-%m-%d"))
  df$stop = as.numeric(as.Date(df$stop, "%Y-%m-%d"))
  res = as.data.frame(table(unlist(apply(df[-1], 1, 
                        function(x) seq(x[1], x[2])))))
  res$Var1 = factor(as.Date(as.numeric(as.character(res$Var1)), 
                            origin = "1970-01-01"))
  res                      
}
f1()
#        Var1 Freq
#1 2014-01-01    1
#2 2014-01-02    2
#3 2014-01-03    3
#4 2014-01-04    3
#5 2014-01-05    2
#6 2014-01-06    1
f2()
#        Var1 Freq
#1 2014-01-01    1
#2 2014-01-02    2
#3 2014-01-03    3
#4 2014-01-04    3
#5 2014-01-05    2
#6 2014-01-06    1

And benchmarking on a larger data.frame:

df = data.frame(person = paste("ID", 1:1e3, sep = ""),
                start = as.Date(sample(Sys.Date() : (Sys.Date()+10), 1e3, T), 
                                origin = "1970-01-01"))
df$stop = df$start + 5
head(df)
#  person      start       stop
#1    ID1 2014-03-07 2014-03-12
#2    ID2 2014-03-01 2014-03-06
#3    ID3 2014-03-04 2014-03-09
#4    ID4 2014-02-28 2014-03-05
#5    ID5 2014-02-27 2014-03-04
#6    ID6 2014-03-07 2014-03-12
identical(f1(), f2())
#[1] TRUE
library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(f1(), f2(), times = 10)
#Unit: milliseconds
# expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
# f1() 366.90895 368.36777 379.78573 395.82724 410.17782    10
# f2()  31.66473  32.11122  33.04891  33.62642  35.75063    10
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Thank you, this works well and is relatively fast. –  BeginR Feb 26 at 5:49
    
@BeginR See if are helpful some edits I made relating to your comment –  alexis_laz Feb 26 at 16:24
    
Thank you, even better. –  BeginR Feb 27 at 15:34

This works:

df[, -1] <- lapply(df[-1], as.Date)

data.frame(table(unlist(lapply(1:nrow(df), function(i) {
    as.character(seq.Date(df$start[i], df$stop[i], "day"))
}))))

##         Var1 Freq
## 1 2014-01-01    1
## 2 2014-01-02    2
## 3 2014-01-03    3
## 4 2014-01-04    3
## 5 2014-01-05    2
## 6 2014-01-06    1
share|improve this answer
    
This also works but when used on a larger data set took a long time to compute. –  BeginR Feb 26 at 5:49

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