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I want to cross-join two data tables without evaluating the full cross join, using a ranging criterion in the process. In essence, I would like CJ with filtering/ranging expression.

Can someone suggest a high performing approach avoiding the full cross join?

See test example below doing the job with the evil full cross join.

library(data.table)

# Test data.
dt1 <- data.table(id1=1:10, D=2*(1:10), key="id1")
dt2 <- data.table(id2=21:23, D1=c(5, 7, 10), D2=c(9, 12, 16), key="id2")

# Desired filtered cross-join data table by hand: D1 <= D & D <= D2.
dtfDesired <- data.table(
    id1=c(3, 4, 4, 5, 6, 5, 6, 7, 8)
  , id2=c(rep(21, 2), rep(22, 3), rep(23, 4))
  , D1=c(rep(5, 2), rep(7, 3), rep(10, 4))
  , D=c(6, 8, 8, 10, 12, 10, 12, 14, 16)
  , D2=c(rep(9, 2), rep(12, 3), rep(16, 4))
)
setkey(dtfDesired, id1, id2)

# My "inefficient" programmatic attempt with full cross join.
fullCJ <- function(dt1, dt2) {
  # Full cross-product: NOT acceptable with real data!
  dtCrossAll <- CJ(dt1$id1, dt2$id2)
  setnames(dtCrossAll, c("id1", "id2"))
  # Merge all columns.
  dtf <- merge(dtCrossAll, dt1, by="id1")
  dtf <- merge(dtf, dt2, by="id2")
  setkey(dtf, id1, id2)
  # Reorder columns for convenience.
  setcolorder(dtf, c("id1", "id2", "D1", "D", "D2"))
  # Finally, filter the cases I want.
  dtf[D1 <= D & D <= D2, ]
}

dtf <- fullCJ(dt1, dt2)

# Print results.
print(dt1)
print(dt2)
print(dtfDesired)
all.equal(dtf, dtfDesired)

Test data output

> # Print results.
> print(dt1)
    id1  D
 1:   1  2
 2:   2  4
 3:   3  6
 4:   4  8
 5:   5 10
 6:   6 12
 7:   7 14
 8:   8 16
 9:   9 18
10:  10 20
> print(dt2)
   id2 D1 D2
1:  21  5  9
2:  22  7 12
3:  23 10 16
> print(dtfDesired)
   id1 id2 D1  D D2
1:   3  21  5  6  9
2:   4  21  5  8  9
3:   4  22  7  8 12
4:   5  22  7 10 12
5:   5  23 10 10 16
6:   6  22  7 12 12
7:   6  23 10 12 16
8:   7  23 10 14 16
9:   8  23 10 16 16
> all.equal(dtf, dtfDesired)
[1] TRUE

So now the challenge is to write the filtered cross join in a way that can scale to millions of rows!

Below are a collection of alternative implementations including those suggested in answers and comments.

# My "inefficient" programmatic attempt looping manually.
manualIter <- function(dt1, dt2) {
  id1Match <- NULL; id2Match <- NULL; dtf <- NULL;
  for (i1 in seq_len(nrow(dt1))) {
    # Find matches in dt2 of this dt1 row.
    row1 <- dt1[i1, ]
    id1 <- row1$id1
    D <- row1$D
    dt2Match <- dt2[D1 <= D & D <= D2, ]
    nMatches <- nrow(dt2Match)
    if (0 < nMatches) {
      id1Match <- c(id1Match, rep(id1, nMatches))
      id2Match <- c(id2Match, dt2Match$id2)
    }
  }
  # Build the return data.table for the matching ids.
  dtf <- data.table(id1=id1Match, id2=id2Match)
  dtf <- merge(dtf, dt1, by="id1")
  dtf <- merge(dtf, dt2, by="id2")
  setkey(dtf, id1, id2)
  # Reorder columns for convenience & consistency.
  setcolorder(dtf, c("id1", "id2", "D1", "D", "D2"))
  return(dtf)
}

dtJoin1 <- function(dt1, dt2) {
  dtf <- dt1[, dt2[D1 <= D & D <= D2, list(id2=id2)], by=id1]
  dtf <- merge(dtf, dt1, by="id1")
  dtf <- merge(dtf, dt2, by="id2")
  setkey(dtf, id1, id2)
  setcolorder(dtf, c("id1", "id2", "D1", "D", "D2")) # Reorder columns for convenience & consistency.
  return(dtf)
}

dtJoin2 <- function(dt1, dt2) {
  dtf <- dt2[, dt1[D1 <= D & D <= D2, list(id1=id1, D1=D1, D=D, D2=D2)], by=id2]
  setkey(dtf, id1, id2)
  setcolorder(dtf, c("id1", "id2", "D1", "D", "D2")) # Reorder columns for convenience & consistency.
  return(dtf)
}

# Install Bioconductor IRanges (see bioTreeRange below).
source("http://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R")
biocLite("IRanges")

# Solution using Bioconductor IRanges.
bioTreeRange <- function(dt1, dt2) {
  require(IRanges)
  ir1 <- IRanges(dt1$D, width=1L)
  ir2 <- IRanges(dt2$D1, dt2$D2)
  olaps <- findOverlaps(ir1, ir2, type="within")
  dtf <- cbind(dt1[queryHits(olaps)], dt2[subjectHits(olaps)])
  setkey(dtf, id1, id2)
  setcolorder(dtf, c("id1", "id2", "D1", "D", "D2")) # Reorder columns for convenience.
  return(dtf)
}

And now below is a little benchmark on a bigger data set 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than my real underlying scenario. The real scenario fails on the full cross-join huge memory allocation.

set.seed(1)
n1 <- 10000
n2 <- 1000
dtbig1 <- data.table(id1=1:n1, D=1:n1, key="id1")
dtbig2 <- data.table(id2=1:n2, D1=sort(sample(1:n1, n2)), key="id2")
dtbig2$D2 <- with(dtbig2, D1 + 100)

library("microbenchmark")
mbenchmarkRes <- microbenchmark(
  fullCJRes <- fullCJ(dtbig1, dtbig2)
  , manualIterRes <- manualIter(dtbig1, dtbig2)
  , dtJoin1Res <- dtJoin1(dtbig1, dtbig2)
  , dtJoin2Res <- dtJoin2(dtbig1, dtbig2)
  , bioTreeRangeRes <- bioTreeRange(dtbig1, dtbig2)
  , times=3, unit="s", control=list(order="inorder", warmup=1)
)
mbenchmarkRes$expr <- c("fullCJ", "manualIter", "dtJoin1", "dtJoin2", "bioTreeRangeRes") # Shorten names for better display.

# Print microbenchmark
print(mbenchmarkRes, order="median")

And now the current benchmark results I got on my machine:

> print(mbenchmarkRes, order="median")
Unit: seconds
            expr        min         lq     median         uq        max neval
 bioTreeRangeRes 0.05833279 0.05843753 0.05854227 0.06099377 0.06344527     3
         dtJoin2 1.20519664 1.21583650 1.22647637 1.23606216 1.24564796     3
          fullCJ 4.00370434 4.03572702 4.06774969 4.17001658 4.27228347     3
         dtJoin1 8.02416333 8.03504136 8.04591938 8.20015977 8.35440016     3
      manualIter 8.69061759 8.69716448 8.70371137 8.76859060 8.83346982     3

Conclusions

  • The Bioconductor tree/IRanges solution from Arun (bioTreeRangeRes) is two orders of magnitude faster than the alternatives. But the install seems to have updated other CRAN libraries (my fault, I accepted it when the install asked the question); some of them can no longer be found when loading them -- e.g., gtools and gplots.
  • The fastest pure data.table option from BrodieG (dtJoin2) is probably not as efficient as I need it to be but at least is reasonable in terms of memory consumption (I will let it run overnight on my real scenario ~ 1 Million rows).
  • I tried changing the data table keys (using the dates instead of id's); it did not have any impact.
  • As expected, explicitly writing the loop in R (manualIter) crawls.
share|improve this question
    
For this example (and probably any "ranging" join criteria), cross joining makes redundant data, leading to your memory problems. You could use dt2 to make labels for each interval that D might fall into: [5,7] is "21"; [7,9] is "21,22"; etc. with appropriate conditions for edge cases. After that, just apply those labels to dt1. –  Frank Feb 25 at 22:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This seems like a problem that could benefit a lot from using interval trees algorithm. A very nice implementation is available from the bioconductor package IRanges.

# Installation
source("http://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R")
biocLite("IRanges")

# solution
require(IRanges)
ir1 <- IRanges(dt1$D, width=1L)
ir2 <- IRanges(dt2$D1, dt2$D2)

olaps <- findOverlaps(ir1, ir2, type="within")
cbind(dt1[queryHits(olaps)], dt2[subjectHits(olaps)])

   id1  D id2 D1 D2
1:   3  6  21  5  9
2:   4  8  21  5  9
3:   4  8  22  7 12
4:   5 10  22  7 12
5:   5 10  23 10 16
6:   6 12  22  7 12
7:   6 12  23 10 16
8:   7 14  23 10 16
9:   8 16  23 10 16
share|improve this answer
    
wow, that's fast. Generating the custom cross join like so: my.cj <- dtbig2[, dtbig1[D1 <= D & D <= D2, list(id1=id1)], by=id2] was much, much, slower. –  BrodieG Feb 25 at 23:11
    
@BrodieG Can you point me in the doc detailing how your pure data.table join works? In data.table FAQ, I see explanations for X[Y] but not X[, Y]. Thanks. –  Patrick Feb 26 at 23:58
    
@Patrick, all I'm doing is evaluating an expression (dtbig1[D1 <= ...]) inside dtbig2, so what's happening is that for each id2 group, I'm pulling id1 values from ALL of dtbig1 that meet the conditions for that id2's D2 and D1 values. –  BrodieG Feb 27 at 0:02

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