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I have a method that looks like this:

def method(:name => nil, :color => nil, shoe_size => nil) 
  SomeOtherObject.some_other_method(THE HASH THAT THOSE KEYWORD ARGUMENTS WOULD MAKE)
end

For any given call, I can accept any combination of optional values. I like the named arguments, because I can just look at the method's signature to see what options are available.

What I don't know is if there is a shortcut for what I have described in capital letters in the code sample above.

Back in the olden days, it used to be:

def method(opts)
  SomeOtherObject.some_other_method(opts)
end

Elegant, simple, almost cheating.

Is there a shortcut for those Keyword Arguments or do I have to reconstitute my options hash in the method call?

share|improve this question

Yes, this is possible, but it's not very elegant.

You'll have to use the parameters method, which returns an array of the method's parameters and their types (in this case we only have keyword arguments).

def foo(one: 1, two: 2, three: 3)
  method(__method__).parameters
end  
#=> [[:key, :one], [:key, :two], [:key, :three]]

Knowing that, there's various ways how to use that array to get a hash of all the parameters and their provided values.

def foo(one: 1, two: 2, three: 3)
  params = method(__method__).parameters.map(&:last)
  opts = params.map { |p| [p, eval(p.to_s)] }.to_h
end
#=> {:one=>1, :two=>2, :three=>3}

# Or another way
def foo(one: 1, two: 2, three: 3)
  params = method(__method__).parameters.map(&:last)
  opts = Hash[ params.map { |p| [p, eval(p.to_s)] } ]
end  
#=> {:one=>1, :two=>2, :three=>3}

So your example would look like

def method(name: nil, color: nil, shoe_size: nil)
  opts = method(__method__).parameters.map(&:last).map { |p| [p, eval(p.to_s)] }.to_h
  SomeOtherObject.some_other_method(opts)
end

Think carefully about using this. It's clever but at the cost of readability, others reading your code won't like it.

You can make it slightly more readable with a helper method.

# Returns the parameters of the caller.
def params
  caller_method = caller_locations(length=1).first.label  
  method(caller_method).parameters 
end

def method(name: nil, color: nil, shoe_size: nil)
  opts = params.map { |p| [p, eval(p.to_s)] }.to_h
  SomeOtherObject.some_other_method(opts)
end

Update: Ruby 2.2 introduced Binding#local_variables which can be used instead of Method#parameters. Be careful because you have to call local_variables before defining any additional local variables inside the method.

# Using Method#parameters
def foo(one: 1, two: 2, three: 3)
  params = method(__method__).parameters.map(&:last)
  opts = params.map { |p| [p, eval(p.to_s)] }.to_h
end
#=> {:one=>1, :two=>2, :three=>3}

# Using Bingind#local_variables
def bar(one: 1, two: 2, three: 3)
  params = binding.local_variables
  opts = params.map { |p| [p, eval(p.to_s)] }.to_h
end
#=> {:one=>1, :two=>2, :three=>3}
share|improve this answer
    
Is the issue we don't want to restate it as follows? def foo(one: 1, two: 2, three: 3) params = {one: one, two: two, three: three)} end Whats the benefit of writing it out like your examples? It seems confusing. Also another question of how legitimate are these implementation? Is this a good way to use named_params ? – jmoon90 Jun 10 '15 at 18:13
    
@jmoon90 that's right, we don't want to do params = { ... } because then we're hardcoding the implementation and it becomes very coupled. The benefit of doing it like in my examples is that you can change the method signature and still automatically capture all keyword parameters. I'm not sure I understand your other question about named_params. – Dennis Jun 14 '15 at 14:01
1  
Better to use binding.local_variable_get(p) instead of eval(p.to_s) when using local_variables, just to avoid that evil eval ... – Markus Jul 17 '15 at 10:28

Of course! Just use the double splat (**) operator.

def print_all(**keyword_arguments)
  puts keyword_arguments
end

def mixed_signature(some: 'option', **rest)
  puts some
  puts rest
end

print_all example: 'double splat (**)', arbitrary: 'keyword arguments'
# {:example=>"double splat (**)", :arbitrary=>"keyword arguments"}

mixed_signature another: 'option'
# option
# {:another=>"option"}

It works just like the regular splat (*), used for collecting parameters. You can even forward the keyword arguments to another method.

def forward_all(*arguments, **keyword_arguments, &block)
  SomeOtherObject.some_other_method *arguments,
                                    **keyword_arguments,
                                    &block
end
share|improve this answer
6  
No, I am interested in gathering all of the optional, named Keyword Parameters into a hash. I am not trying to create a new options hash. I want a hash of {:name => val, :color => val, etc.}, which are named in the method signature. – Jesse Farmer Feb 25 '14 at 21:59

I had some fun with this, so thanks for that. Here's what I came up with:

describe "Argument Extraction Experiment" do
  let(:experiment_class) do
    Class.new do
      def method_with_mixed_args(one, two = 2, three:, four: 4)
        extract_args(binding)
      end

      def method_with_named_args(one:, two: 2, three: 3)
        extract_named_args(binding)
      end

      def method_with_unnamed_args(one, two = 2, three = 3)
        extract_unnamed_args(binding)
      end

      private

      def extract_args(env, depth = 1)
        caller_param_names = method(caller_locations(depth).first.label).parameters
        caller_param_names.map do |(arg_type,arg_name)|
          { name: arg_name, value: eval(arg_name.to_s, env), type: arg_type }
        end
      end

      def extract_named_args(env)
        extract_args(env, 2).select {|arg| [:key, :keyreq].include?(arg[:type]) }
      end

      def extract_unnamed_args(env)
        extract_args(env, 2).select {|arg| [:opt, :req].include?(arg[:type]) }
      end
    end
  end

  describe "#method_with_mixed_args" do
    subject { experiment_class.new.method_with_mixed_args("uno", three: 3) }
    it "should return a list of the args with values and types" do
      expect(subject).to eq([
        { name: :one,    value: "uno", type: :req },
        { name: :two,    value: 2,     type: :opt },
        { name: :three,  value: 3,     type: :keyreq },
        { name: :four,   value: 4,     type: :key }
      ])
    end
  end

  describe "#method_with_named_args" do
    subject { experiment_class.new.method_with_named_args(one: "one", two: 4) }
    it "should return a list of the args with values and types" do
      expect(subject).to eq([
        { name: :one,    value: "one", type: :keyreq },
        { name: :two,    value: 4,     type: :key },
        { name: :three,  value: 3,     type: :key }
      ])
    end
  end

  describe "#method_with_unnamed_args" do
    subject { experiment_class.new.method_with_unnamed_args(2, 4, 6) }
    it "should return a list of the args with values and types" do
      expect(subject).to eq([
        { name: :one,    value: 2,  type: :req },
        { name: :two,    value: 4,  type: :opt },
        { name: :three,  value: 6,  type: :opt }
      ])
    end
  end
end

I chose to return an array, but you could easily modify this to return a hash instead (for instance, by not caring about the argument type after the initial detection).

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