Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For testing purposes, I'm creating temporary classes which I want to delete (before other test methods run). Trouble is, [superclass].__subclasses__() still lists the deleted classes, even after running garbage collection.

Here's what my test method looks like:

class Apple(Fruit):
    @staticmethod
    def mass(size):
        return size

class Orange(Fruit):
    @staticmethod
    def mass(size):
        return size

try:
    Apple()
    Orange()
    a1 = Apple(type='fuji')
finally:
    if 'a1' in locals():
        print 'del a1'
        del a1
    print gc.get_referrers(Apple)
    print gc.get_referrers(Orange)
    del Apple
    del Orange
    print Fruit.__subclasses__()
    gc.collect()
    print Fruit.__subclasses__()

The output is as follows:

del a1
[<frame object at 0xabcdef0>, (<class 'Apple'>, <class 'Fruit'>, <type 'object'>), <Apple object at 0x4443331>, {'a1': <Apple object at 0x4443331, 'self': <FruitTests testMethod=test_pass_Fruit_core>, 'Orange': <class 'Orange'>, 'Apple': <class 'Apple'>}]    
[<frame object at 0xabcdef0>, (<class 'Orange'>, <class 'Fruit'>, <type 'object'>), {'a1': <Apple object at 0x4443331, 'self': <FruitTests testMethod=test_pass_Fruit_core>, 'Orange': <class 'Orange'>, 'Apple': <class 'Apple'>}]
[<class 'Apple'>, <class 'Orange'>]
[<class 'Apple'>, <class 'Orange'>]

None of the classes involved have an explicitly-defined __del__(), although Fruit does use __metaclass__ = abc.ABCMeta and a @abc.abstractmethod decorator on Fruit.mass().

The remaining class reference has something to do with the assignment of the Fruit instance to a variable: If I remove all the lines containing a1, the final Fruit.__subclasses__() returns [] - even though the bare constructor Apple() still runs.

This is a problem for me because another test is concerned with fruit interactions (call the relevant method-to-be-tested blends()), and that uses a Fruit.__subclasses__() call to check combinations of different types of Fruit. I haven't bothered to define interactions with these test classes, and that's confusing blends().

Any hints on why these references are sticking around would be appreciated.

Edit: If I call gc.get_referrers(Apple) after gc.collect(), I get an "UnboundLocalError: local variable 'Apple' referenced before assignment" Fruit defines a number of methods with the "@classmethod "and "@property" decorators, and references another class which handles "blends()"...

After garbage collection, gc.get_referrers(Fruit.__subclasses__()[0]) returns

[{'a1': <Apple object at 0x4443331>, 'self': <FruitTests testMethod=test_pass_Fruit_core>, 'Orange': <class 'Orange'>, 'Apple': <class 'Apple'>}, <Apple object at 0x4443331>, (<class 'Apple'>, <class 'Fruit'>, <type 'object'>)]

Edit: The problem occurs when I run just this one test method. (It also occurs when I queue up multiple tests.) I tried rebooting my IDE (PyCharm) and running "./manage.py test FruitTests.test_pass_Fruit_core " from the command line. All cases yield the same results, although the particular memory addresses vary. locals() is being called directly - I don't have it aliased anywhere.

Edit: The entire module defining Fruit:

from abc import abstractmethod, ABCMeta


class Fruit(object):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        super(Fruit, self).__init__()

    @abstractmethod
    def mass(self, size):
        raise NotImplementedError

In the test method, test_pass_Fruit_core(), "a1 = Apple()" and "a1 = Apple(type='fuji')" produce the same results. Dropping the assignment to "a1" makes no difference, but if I drop the call to "locals()", garbage collection works as expected - Apple is no longer available as a subclass of Fruit at the end of the method.

share|improve this question
    
And what does gc.get_referrers(Apple) print after garbage collection? –  Martijn Pieters Feb 25 at 22:28
    
The references to subclasses are weak references, so something else is still referring to these classes. The ABC architecture also holds references, again weak references are used. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 25 at 22:29
    
Use gc.gen_referrers(Fruit.__subclasses__()[0]). –  Martijn Pieters Feb 25 at 22:34
    
So, is there another FruitTests.test_pass_Fruit_core test method alive somewhere holding on to another set of these subclasses? Or did you store the output of locals() somewhere, that looks like a locals() dictionary. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 25 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

In garbage collected environments object's life time is not your responsibility. And because of this, you shouldn't rely on that. Unit tests should test your business logic, each unit test should test one of unit's responsibilities. Object life time can't be their responsibility, and if your logic relies on it, then either you're using the wrong environment, or you're misusing your current environment.

Perhaps try to introduce a notion of an "active" Fruit in your implementation, using patterns like Pool or/and Factory. If you'll delete an object from your list of "active" object you won't have to worry about GS's "indeterminism".

share|improve this answer
    
It seems awkward to introduce an attribute which will only be used in the tests. The purpose of the above tests is to verify that the @abc.abstractmethod decorator is present and works as advertised. (That is, these classes should be instantiable if and only if the subclass provides an explicit definition of mass.) –  Sarah Messer Feb 25 at 23:24
    
@SarahMesser That looks again as trying to test something that isn't your responsibility. The abc module should have its own unit tests that prove its working correctly. –  BartoszKP Feb 25 at 23:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The persistent reference is being created in the call to locals(). To guarantee "del a1" does not generate an error if one was created inside the "try:" block, assign "a1 = None" before the block and skip the call to locals().

Final, working code follows. Compare with the first code block above: class Apple(Fruit): @staticmethod def mass(size): return size

class Orange(Fruit):
    @staticmethod
    def mass(size):
        return size

a1 = None
try:
    Apple()
    Orange()
    a1 = Apple(type='fuji')
finally:
    del a1
    print gc.get_referrers(Apple)
    print gc.get_referrers(Orange)
    del Apple
    del Orange
    print Fruit.__subclasses__()
    gc.collect()
    sc = Fruit.__subclasses__()
    print sc
    if len(sc) > 0:
        print 42, gc.get_referrers(sc[0])
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.