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I maintain a cross-platform C codebase and on a few platforms (Xcode 4, Red Hat derived distros like Fedora and Mageia), I get the following compiler error:

warning: declaration of 'index' shadows a global declaration

Based on this answer, I understand that this is because some BSD-based C implementations define a non-standard index function in string.h which means that this warning shows up whenever I declare an index variable. I assure you that I do not have any global index variables.

I know I can avoid naming anything index but it's a semantically useful name so I end up using it all over the place. I know I can also suppress this warning, for example by using -Wno-shadow in GCC, but I'd rather not globally disable an otherwise useful compiler warning.

So how can I solve this problem? That is, is it somehow possible to detect if the platform has the index function and disable the warning there only, or how can I redefine it if it exists?

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2 Answers 2

Check the header where index is declared, it may be wrapped in some #if or #ifdef that you may exploit to prevent it from being declared.

There may also be a compiler #pragma that you can use to disable the warning on the specific line it occurs. At least clang has this:

#pragma clang diagnostic push
#pragma clang diagnostic ignored "-Wshadow"
// code that produces warning
#pragma clang diagnostic pop

I think gcc has the same if you replace clang with GCC. Older versions may not support push, and I'm not sure if the switch for the warning is the same in both. If it works with #pragma GCC, clang should also recognise the #pragma so you don't need to duplicate.

For the record, I don't get this warning by including <string.h> and defining int index; on either Debian or OS X with clang or gcc using -Wshadow… Are you sure your index comes from <string.h>? On OS X with XCode 5 it is in <strings.h> (plural).

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I no longer get it in OSX since Xcode 5 I believe. I also have not seen it in Debian-based Linuxes. –  congusbongus Feb 25 at 23:54

This was a GCC bug fixed in 4.8 branch

The option -Wshadow no longer warns if a declaration shadows a function declaration, unless the former declares a function or pointer to function, because this is a common and valid case in real-world code.

This is no longer a problem in Mageia 4 (GCC 4.8.2) or Fedora 19 (GCC 4.8.1) and 20 (GCC 4.8.2) but I don't know any clean solution to avoid the warning apart from changing the variable name, maybe to something more specific.

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