Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table that manages virtual download folders for a site.

CREATE TABLE `folder` (
  # id = PK
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  # folderId = self referencing FK to id
  `folderId` int(10) unsigned default NULL,
  # siteId = FK to id in site table
  `siteId` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL
)

Ideally I like siteId to reference id in table site, but also have a compound FK folderId, siteId to be self referencing to id, siteId in table folder.

The reason I want this is that I want to guarantee that a child folder always belongs to the same site as the parent folder.

Is something like this possible? If so, how? And if not, do you have any other suggestions how I can guarantee this state?

EDIT:
Sorry, I should have mentioned this earlier: I know about InnoDB, and as a matter of fact, I'm using it already (along with foreign keys). But the question is, how will I be able to guarantee these two things:

  • A record in folder must reference a valid site with siteId
  • A record in folder must also be the same siteId as the parent record (only if it is a child of course)

I tried this so far:

  # this one should guarantee folder belongs to
  # a valid site (this one works of course)
  CONSTRAINT `FK_folder_site_1`
    FOREIGN KEY (`siteId`)
    REFERENCES `site` (`id`) ON UPDATE CASCADE,

  # this one should guarantee child folder belongs to
  # the same site as parent folder (doesn't work)
  CONSTRAINT `FK_folder_folder_1`
    FOREIGN KEY `FK_folder_folder_1` (`folderId`, `siteId`)
    REFERENCES `folder` (`id`, `siteId`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE

So the last one doesn't work (of course?) because it seems logical that a foreign key (siteId) can't reference two different fields. What can you suggest to make my proposed constraints work?

share|improve this question
    
I don't see why you need both the foreign keys. The second one alone should be sufficient to ensure that a record references a valid folder/site combination. –  friedo Feb 5 '10 at 5:47

2 Answers 2

The InnoDB storage engine supports self-referencing foreign keys, and you can use them to emulate a hierarchical structure. To declare the key, you could do something like this in your CREATE TABLE statement:

FOREIGN KEY (`folderId`,`siteId`) REFERENCES `folder` (`Id`, `siteId`)

An important thing to remember is that this key should be NULL-able, so you can indicate which record(s) are the root of the tree.

share|improve this answer
    
@friedo: thanks, but I'm using InnoDB with foreign keys already. I've updated my question to state the problem more clearly (I hope). Would you mind taking another look at it? Thanks. –  Decent Dabbler Feb 4 '10 at 20:56

You can do this if you use the InnoDB storage engine

CREATE TABLE `folder` (
  # id = PK
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  # folderId = self referencing FK to id
  `folderId` int(10) unsigned default NULL,
  # siteId = FK to id in site table
  `siteId` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  FOREIGN KEY (folder_id, site_id) REFERENCES folder(id, site_id)
) ENGINE=INNODB;

It didn't test it but it should work. See FOREIGN KEY Constraints.

If you want/have to use MyISAM, of course you can do this logically the same way as you do it with the "normal" foreign key constraints.

share|improve this answer
    
@Felix: thanks, but I'm using InnoDB with foreign keys already. I've updated my question to state the problem more clearly (I hope). Would you mind taking another look at it? Thanks. –  Decent Dabbler Feb 4 '10 at 20:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.