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I have a node.js/socket.IO server that has been under attack recently, so I decided to start using cloudflare to hide my server IP. However, anyone can easily get the server IP from the client javascript file. Is there anything I can do to connect through cloudflare and not my server directly, so I can help prevent attackers from getting the server IP?

E.g.:

var client = io.connect('http://141.101.xxx.xxx:466');

That would be the IP when I ping the domain that is using cloudflare. I try to connect to it directly.

Even attempting to connect to the domain itself doesn't seem to work

var client = io.connect('http://mydomainthatusescloudflare.com:466');

Only thing that works is directly connecting to the server, without going through cloudflare (thus revealing the IP)

var client = io.connect('http://217.xxx.xxx.xxx:466');
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Connecting to the cloudflare domain won't work, since they don't forward the ports to your server. This problem shouldn't be solved through obscurity, but rather, a load balancer or something of the sort. You could also just create a subdomain and point it to your origin server, but the IP could still be figured out. –  Rob Feb 26 '14 at 3:19
    
@rob Any recommendations to some that can prevent average DDoS attacks? –  Justin Feb 26 '14 at 3:24
    
Scale based on traffic, I don't know of any specific drop-in solution, have you tried doing a search on it? It all depends on the kind of service, budget and infrastructure you want to manage. –  Rob Feb 26 '14 at 3:31

1 Answer 1

You can use cfdomain:80 for socket.io and add this line,

io.set("transports", ["xhr-polling", "jsonp-polling"]);

but disconnected event isnt work. I am trying to fix it.

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Please tell me when you find a fix for it! –  Justin Mar 5 '14 at 0:12

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