Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a SQL Statement which i am trying to optimise to remove the sort operator

SELECT *,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
        PARTITION BY RuleInstanceId 
        ORDER BY [Timestamp] DESC
   ) AS rn
FROM RuleInstanceHistoricalMembership

Everything I have read (eg. Optimizing SQL queries by removing Sort operator in Execution plan) suggests this is the correct index to add however it appears to have no effect at all.

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_MyIndex ON dbo.[RuleInstanceHistoricalMembership](RuleInstanceId, [Timestamp] DESC)

enter image description here

I must be missing something as I have read heaps of articles which all seem to sugguest an index spanning both columns should solve this issue

share|improve this question
1  
What happens when you change the select * to select RuleInstanceID, Timestamp –  1_CR Feb 26 '14 at 4:18
    
@1_CR that makes it go away, do i need the index to cross all selected columns also? –  Luke McGregor Feb 26 '14 at 4:21
1  
With a select * it's basically a choice for the optimizer between a clustered index seek for every row of the non-clustered index and a full table scan - it's probably justified in opting for the latter. You could add all the other columns as "payload" onto the non-clustered index by way of "include" columns to avoid having to visit the clustered index but without knowing more about data volumes etc it's hard to know if this is a wise choice –  1_CR Feb 26 '14 at 4:25
    
@1_CR this is in a table which i expect to contain hundreds of millions of rows and has 5 columns (long guid int bit datetimeoffset), is there another alternative to this? –  Luke McGregor Feb 26 '14 at 4:28
    
@LukeMcGregor how much data is currently in the table? –  Namphibian Feb 26 '14 at 5:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Technically the index you have added does allow you to avoid a sort.

However the index you have created is non covering so SQL Server would then also need to perform 60 million key lookups back to the base table.

Simply scanning the clustered index and sorting it on the fly is costed as being considerably cheaper than that option.

In order to get the index to be used automatically you would need to either.

  • Remove columns from the query SELECT list so the index covers it.
  • Add INCLUDE-d columns to the index.

BTW: For a table with 60 million rows you may well find that even if you were to try and force the issue with an index hint on the non covering index you still don't get the desired results of avoiding a sort.

CREATE TABLE RuleInstanceHistoricalMembership
  (
     ID             INT PRIMARY KEY,
     Col2           INT,
     Col3           INT,
     RuleInstanceId INT,
     [Timestamp]    INT
  )

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_MyIndex
  ON dbo.[RuleInstanceHistoricalMembership](RuleInstanceId, [Timestamp] DESC)

/*Fake small table*/
UPDATE STATISTICS RuleInstanceHistoricalMembership 
                  WITH ROWCOUNT = 600, 
                       PAGECOUNT = 10 

SELECT *,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY RuleInstanceId 
                               ORDER BY [Timestamp] DESC ) AS rn
FROM   RuleInstanceHistoricalMembership WITH (INDEX = IX_MyIndex) 

Gives the plan

enter image description here

With no sort but up the row and page count

/*Fake large table*/
UPDATE STATISTICS RuleInstanceHistoricalMembership 
                  WITH ROWCOUNT = 60000000, 
                       PAGECOUNT = 10000000 

And try again and you get

enter image description here

Now it has two sorts!

The scan on the NCI is in RuleInstanceId, Timestamp DESC order but then SQL Server reorders it into clustered index key order (Id ASC) per Optimizing I/O Performance by Sorting.

This step is to try and reduce the expected massive cost of 60 million random lookups into the clustered index. Then it gets sorted back into the original RuleInstanceId, Timestamp DESC order that the index delivered it in.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks heaps for this answer, I have a heaps better understanding of why SQL wasnt picking my index now, Much appreciated –  Luke McGregor Feb 27 '14 at 23:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.