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How do you create custom field lookups in Django?

When filtering querysets, django provides a set of lookups that you can use: __contains, __iexact, __in, and so forth. I want to be able to provide a new lookup for my manager, so for instance, someone could say:

twentysomethings = Person.objects.filter(age__within5=25)

and get back all the Person objects with an age between 20 and 30. Do I need to subclass the QuerySet or Manager class to do this? How would it be implemented?

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3  
These answers are useful for his example (which may or may not have been something he just tossed out to make his point).. but I'd love it if someone would answer the question that was actually asked. –  royal Dec 7 '10 at 3:39
1  
@royal I think my answer covers it- I've had this come up in a library I'm working on. –  Matt Luongo Nov 26 '11 at 22:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First, let me say that there is no Django machinery in place that's meant to publicly facilitate what you'd like.

(Edit - actually since Django 1.7 there is: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.7/howto/custom-lookups/ )

That said, if you really want to accomplish this, subclass QuerySet and override the _filter_or_exclude() method. Then create a custom manager that only returns your custom QuerySet (or monkey-patch Django's QuerySet, yuck). We do this in neo4django to reuse as much of the Django ORM queryset code as possible while building Neo4j-specific Query objects.

Try something (roughly) like this, adapted from Zach's answer. I've left actual error handling for the field lookup parsing as an exercise for the reader :)

class PersonQuerySet(models.query.QuerySet):
    def _filter_or_exclude(self, negate, *args, **kwargs):
        cust_lookups = filter(lambda s: s[0].endswith('__within5'), kwargs.items())
        for lookup in cust_lookups:
            kwargs.pop(lookup[0])
            lookup_prefix = lookup[0].rsplit('__',1)[0]
            kwargs.update({lookup_prefix + '__gte':lookup[1]-5,
                           lookup_prefix + '__lt':lookup[1]+5})
        return super(PersonQuerySet, self)._filter_or_exclude(negate, *args, **kwargs)

class PersonManager(models.Manager):
    def get_query_set(self):
         return PersonQuerySet(self.model)

class Person(models.Model):
    age = #...

    objects = PersonManager()

Final remarks - clearly, if you want to chain custom field lookups, this is going to get pretty hairy. Also, I'd normally write this a bit more functionally and use itertools for performance, but thought it was more clear to leave it out. Have fun!

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1  
Thanks dude, this was helpful. –  nisc Feb 3 '12 at 13:28
    
Glad somebody's using it! –  Matt Luongo Feb 3 '12 at 15:05
1  
Just found your answer! Thanks so much for this. That's what I was looking for. –  jcdyer Apr 11 '12 at 20:28

A more flexible way to do this is to write a custom QuerySet as well as a custom manager. Working from ozan's code:

class PersonQuerySet(models.query.QuerySet):
    def in_age_range(self, min, max):
        return self.filter(age__gte=min, age__lt=max)

class PersonManager(models.Manager):
    def get_query_set(self):
         return PersonQuerySet(self.model)

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return getattr(self.get_query_set(), name)

class Person(models.Model):
    age = #...

    objects = PersonManager()

This allows you to chain your custom query. So both these queries would be valid:

Person.objects.in_age_range(20,30)

Person.objects.exclude(somefield = some_value).in_age_range(20, 30)
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That's excellent! I'm still kinda hoping there's some API for hooking into the lookup field syntax, to take advantage of the rlationship traversal logic. I'll keep digging. In the meantime, I think this gets me a step closer to understanding how the pieces tie together. Thanks! –  jcdyer Feb 6 '10 at 0:02
    
You can do this a little more easily/cleanly with django-qmethod. It looks like it hasn't been updated in a while but I've been using it for years and never had any trouble. –  Dave May 2 '14 at 11:43

Rather than creating a field lookup, best practice would be to create a manager method, that might look a little bit like this:

class PersonManger(models.Manager):
    def in_age_range(self, min, max):
        return self.filter(age__gte=min, age__lt=max)

class Person(models.Model):
    age = #...

    objects = PersonManager()

then usage would be like so:

twentysomethings = Person.objects.in_age_range(20, 30)
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