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I have this structure of classes.

class Interface{
...
}

class Foo : public Interface{
...
}

template <class T>
class Container{
...
}

And I have this constructor of some other class Bar.

Bar(const Container<Interface> & bar){
...
}

When I call the constructor this way I get "no matching function" error.

Container<Foo> container ();

Bar * temp = new Bar(container);

What is wrong? Are not templates polymorphic?

share|improve this question
    
Templates are not polymorphic. Templates are bound at compile-time, unlike polymorphic objects which are bound at run-time. –  John Dibling Feb 4 '10 at 22:12
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I think the exact terminology for what you need is "template covariance", meaning that if B inherits from A, then somehow T<B> inherits from T<A>. This is not the case in C++, nor it is with Java and C# generics*.

There is a good reason to avoid template covariance: this will simply remove all type safety in the template class. Let me explain with the following example:

//Assume the following class hierarchy
class Fruit {...};

class Apple : public Fruit {...};

class Orange : public Fruit {...};

//Now I will use these types to instantiate a class template, namely std::vector
int main()
{
    std::vector<Apple> apple_vec;
    apple_vec.push_back(Apple()); //no problem here

    //If templates were covariant, the following would be legal
    std::vector<Fruit> & fruit_vec = apple_vec;

    //push_back would expect a Fruit, so I could pass it an Orange
    fruit_vec.push_back(Orange()); 

    //Oh no! I just added an orange in my apple basket!
}

Consequently, you should consider T<A> and T<B> as completely unrelated types, regardless of the relation between A and B.

So how could you solve the issue you're facing? In Java and C#, you could use respectively bounded wildcards and constraints:

//Java code
Bar(Container<? extends Interface) {...}

//C# code
Bar<T>(Container<T> container) where T : Interface {...}

The next C++ Standard (known as C++1x (formerly C++0x)) initially contained an even more powerful mechanism named Concepts, that would have let developers enforce syntaxic and/or semantic requirements on template parameters, but was unfortunately postponed to a later date. However, Boost has a Concept Check library that may interest you.

Nevertheless, concepts might be a little overkill for the problem you encounter, an using a simple static assert as proposed by @gf is probably the best solution.

* Update: Since .Net Framework 4, it is possible to mark generic parameters has being covariant or contravariant.

share|improve this answer

There are two problems here: default constructions have the form MyClass c;; with parentheses it looks like a function declaration to the compiler.

The other problem is that Container<Interface> is simply a different type then Container<Foo> - you could do the following instead to actually get polymorphism:

Bar::Bar(const Container<Interface*>&) {}

Container<Interface*> container;
container.push_back(new Foo);
Bar* temp = new Bar(container);

Or of course you could make Bar or its constructor a template as Kornel has shown.

If you actually want some type-safe compile-time polymorphism, you could use Boost.TypeTraits is_base_of or some equivalent:

template<class T>
Bar::Bar(const Container<T>& c) {
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT((boost::is_base_of<Interface, T>::value));
    // ... will give a compile time error if T doesn't 
    // inherit from Interface
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will try it. –  Rusty Horse Feb 4 '10 at 21:53
    
+1: come to think of it this would be a way nicer solution. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 4 '10 at 21:56
    
That is really nice and exactly what I need. I will not have to change a lot of already implemented code. Thanks again. –  Rusty Horse Feb 4 '10 at 22:02
2  
Error - Line 1: Possessive followed by noun was followed by possessive - expected explanatory statement. –  GManNickG Feb 4 '10 at 22:35
1  
Great, where can i download that? ;) –  Georg Fritzsche Feb 5 '10 at 2:42

No. Imagine that the container parameter is "hardcoded" into the class it defines (and that is actually how it works). Hence the container type is Container_Foo, that is not compatible with Container_Interface.

What you might try however is this:

template<class T>
Bar(const Container<T> & bar){
...
}

Yet you loose direct type checking that way.

Actually the STL way (probably more effective and generic) would be to do

template<class InputIterator>
Bar(InputIterator begin, InputIterator end){
...
}

... but I assume you don't have iterators implemented in the container.

share|improve this answer
    
That is very sad. Thanks for advice. I do not like that solution but I am afraid it is the only left. –  Rusty Horse Feb 4 '10 at 21:45
    
You assume right. I do not need them in that particular way. Frankly do not know how to implement them and do not have time to learn it right now. –  Rusty Horse Feb 4 '10 at 21:58

It is possible to create an inheritance tree for containers, reflecting the inheritance tree of the data. If you have the following data:

class Interface {
public:
    virtual ~Interface()
        {}
    virtual void print() = 0;
};

class Number : public Interface {
public:
    Number(int value) : x( value )
        {}
    int get() const
        { return x; }
    void print()
        { std::printf( "%d\n", get() ); };
private:
    int x;
};

class String : public Interface {
public:
    String(const std::string & value) : x( value )
        {}
    const std::string &get() const
        { return x; }
    void print()
        { std::printf( "%s\n", get().c_str() ); }
private:
    std::string x;
};

You could also have the following containers:

class GenericContainer {
public:
    GenericContainer()
        {}
    ~GenericContainer()
        { v.clear(); }

    virtual void add(Interface &obj)
        { v.push_back( &obj ); }
    Interface &get(unsigned int i)
        { return *v[ i ]; }
    unsigned int size() const
        { return v.size(); }
private:
    std::vector<Interface *> v;
};

class NumericContainer : public GenericContainer {
public:
    virtual void add(Number &obj)
        { GenericContainer::add( obj ); }
    Number &get(unsigned int i)
        { return (Number &) GenericContainer::get( i ); }
};

class TextContainer : public GenericContainer {
public:
    virtual void add(String &obj)
        { GenericContainer::add( obj ); }
    String &get(unsigned int i)
        { return (String &) GenericContainer::get( i ); }
};

This is not the best performing code; it is just to give an idea. The only problem with this approach is that every time you add a new Data class, you have to also create a new Container. Apart from that, you have polymorphism "working again". You can be specific or general:

void print(GenericContainer & x)
{
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < x.size(); ++i) {
        x.get( i ).print();
    }
}

void printNumbers(NumericContainer & x)
{
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < x.size(); ++i) {
        printf( "Number: " );
        x.get( i ).print();
    }
}

int main()
{
    TextContainer strContainer;
    NumericContainer numContainer;
    Number n( 345 );
    String s( "Hello" );

    numContainer.add( n );
    strContainer.add( s );

    print( strContainer );
    print( numContainer );
    printNumbers( numContainer );
}
share|improve this answer

I propose the following workaround, which employs a template function. Although the example use Qt's QList, nothing prevents the solution from being straightforwardly transposed to any other container.

template <class D, class B> // D (Derived) inherits from B (Base)
QList<B> toBaseList(QList<D> derivedList)
{
    QList<B> baseList;
    for (int i = 0; i < derivedList.size(); ++i) {
        baseList.append(derivedList[i]);
    }
    return baseList;
}

Pros:

  • general
  • type-safe
  • fairly efficient if the items are pointers or some other cheaply copy-constructible elements (such as implicitly shared Qt classes)

Cons:

  • requires the creation of a new container, as opposed to enabling the reuse of the original one
  • implies some memory and processor overhead both to create and to populate the new container, which depend heavily on the cost of the copy-constructor
share|improve this answer

container is a container of Foo objects not a container of Interface objects

And it cannot be polymorphic either, pointers to things can be ,but not the objects themselvs. How big would the slots in the container have to be for container if you could put anything derived from interface in it

you need

 container<Interface*>

or better

 container<shared_ptr<Interface> >
share|improve this answer
1  
@pm100, shared_ptr< Interface* >? Have you ever used a shared_ptr?? –  Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 4 '10 at 21:43
1  
@kornel might be a typo... –  bcml Feb 4 '10 at 21:44
    
@msiemeri - true, but note that the rest of the answer assumes that a container<Interface> stores values, while it might actually store Interface* –  Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 4 '10 at 21:45
    
yes all the time, corrected, can i get the downvote off - :-) –  pm100 Feb 4 '10 at 21:46
    
@pm100, container<T> might have a member field vector<T*>, in which case your comment isn't true. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 4 '10 at 21:48

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