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I have to zip n lists with (++). I have found no better way to do that define this operator on lists:

 (+++) = zipWith (\x y -> x ++ " " ++ y)

There is a better solution?

After Markus1189 answer, I formulate a more general question: does exist a function like this:

zipNWith f2 [a] = f2 (f2 x1 x2) x3 ... f2 (xn-2 xn-1) xn?

This is the program which is used the operator ( +++)

csoundLines instrs inits durs amps freqs = putStrLn . unlines $
    repeat "i" +++ ms instrs +++ ms inits +++ ms durs +++ ms amps +++ ms freqs
  where
  (+++) = zipWith (\x y -> x ++ " " ++ y)
  ms xs = map show xs

scaleNTonic n = map (\i -> 440 * 2 ** (i/n)) [0..n]

-- example: csoundLines (repeat 1) [0.5, 1 ..] (repeat 0.5) (repeat 0.3) $ scaleNTonic 6

> i 1 0.5 0.5 0.3 440.0
> i 1 1.0 0.5 0.3 493.8833012561241
> i 1 1.5 0.5 0.3 554.3652619537442
> i 1 2.0 0.5 0.3 622.2539674441618
> i 1 2.5 0.5 0.3 698.4564628660078
> i 1 3.0 0.5 0.3 783.9908719634985
> i 1 3.5 0.5 0.3 880.0
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So what's the problem? –  Nikita Volkov Feb 26 at 7:53
    
There is a more elegant solution? Or an operator already defined in some package? (i did not found). Something like nZipWith (++), similar to fold... –  Alberto Capitani Feb 26 at 7:57
2  
Are you aware of ZipList?. Perhaps it's what you are looking for. There are some examples in the Applicative Functors chapter of LYAH –  Danny Navarro Feb 26 at 8:11
    
If I try:getZipList $ (++) <$> ZipList ["dog","cat"] <*> ZipList ["cat","dog"] the result is ok : ["dogcat","catdog"] but if I try: getZipList $ (++) <$> ZipList ["dog","cat"] <*> ZipList ["cat","dog"] <*> ["rat","rat"], I get an error. How should I change (++) to obtain a valid result? (Not it seems to me that there is an easy solution.) –  Alberto Capitani Feb 26 at 8:30
2  
@AlbertoCapitani, you are missing the last ZipList in ["rat","rat"] –  Danny Navarro Feb 26 at 9:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could also use a fold for arbitrary number of lists:

>>> foldr1 (zipWith (++)) [["dog","cat"],["cat","dog"],["rat","rat"]]
["dogcatrat","catdograt"]

Or with space in between:

>>> foldr1 (zipWith (\x y -> x ++ " " ++ y)) [["dog","cat"],["cat","dog"],["rat","rat"]]
["dog cat rat","cat dog rat"]
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1  
Brilliant solution! –  Yuuri Feb 26 at 9:39

The easiest way to process an arbitrary amount of lists is to put them all in a list:

import Data.List
zipAll :: [[String]] -> [String]
zipAll = map unwords . transpose

ghci> zipAll [["a", "b", "c"], ["1", "2", "3"], ["xx", "yy", "zz"]]
["a 1 xx","b 2 yy","c 3 zz"]

I'm not sure if there is an easy way to pass them as separate arguments (which number is undefined), but you could probably use an approach of printf.

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I had tried a similar solution (map concat . transpose), but will not function if some lists are endless, as in my example. Instead zip "cut" the result on the list shorter, so it is necessary that there is only one finit list to work properly. –  Alberto Capitani Feb 26 at 8:59
2  
transpose works with infinite lists, the result will be infinite too and you can take desired number of elements, e.g. minimum of lengths of the input lists. –  Yuuri Feb 26 at 9:14

IMO there is nothing wrong with your approach. If one was really concerned about performance, I would change it slightly to:

(+++) = zipWith (\x y -> x ++ (' ' : y))

so that you avoid the " " ++ <long list>.

There is also ZipList, but you would have to pass it an function that takes the exact number of arguments you give it, which I guess is not what you want. Yuuri's answer does also work, but as said above there is nothing wrong with your function.

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thank you for your suggestion. I reformulate slightly my question: I will make a slightly more general my question: Is there a predefined function of the type: zipNWith f2 [a] = f2 (f2 x1 x2) x3 ... f2 (xn-2 xn-1) xn? –  Alberto Capitani Feb 26 at 9:30

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