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I need to write a condition that checks if an enum variable in range of values, like it can be done in E language:

enum EnumVariable {a, b, d, g, f, t, k, i};
if (EnumVariable in [ a, g, t, i]) {
    ...
}

Is there a better way in C++ than ask 4 times if EnumVariable==a or EnumVariable==b etc.?

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9  
You could also use switch without break between a, g, t, i for example. –  Kiril Kirov Feb 26 at 7:59
1  
@KirilKirov, I think that's the canonical answer, care to make it one? –  filmor Feb 26 at 8:06
1  
@KirilKirov: indeed the most idiomatic answer, otherwise it would be a mess with non-intuitive operator overloading, template programming, and subset specification structures. –  Carl Colijn Feb 26 at 8:07
1  
Actually, this might in fact be the fastest solution, since switches are often implemented as jump tables, leading to constant complexity while comparing each value is linear and the other approaches here logarithmical. –  filmor Feb 26 at 8:10
1  
@Sigismondo Have you checked this? If you look into the assembly of a switch statement generated by gcc you will see how well the compiler optimises switches. A jump table is actually the worst case here, where a relative jump is performed based on the value you are "switching". I doubt the bitmask solution (which is mostly evaluated at runtime) would match the performance, but I don't have any data on this (yet ;)). –  filmor Feb 26 at 10:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

It appeared, that several people liked my comment and asked to post it as an answer, so:

You can actually use switch for integral types without break-s between some values.

For example, your code could look like:

enum EnumVariable {a, b, d, g, f, t, k, i};
switch( EnumVariable )
{
case a:
case g:
case t:
case i:
    // do something
    break;
// handler other values
};

This would be very efficient, but would work for integral types only, and not for std::string, for example. For other types, you may try to use some of the other answers' suggestions.

It's a bit long for writing, but very, very efficient and does what you need.

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or you could perform a cast/conversion if the type is not what you want (e.g. cast/convert string to char array) –  Matthew Pigram Feb 27 at 2:24
2  
@MatthewPigram Converting a string to char array wouldn't be of much use since switch would compare char arrays by pointer value, so different strings with the same content would compare differently. –  user4815162342 Feb 27 at 6:17
    
Down vote for? (...) –  Kiril Kirov Feb 27 at 7:35
    
@user4815162342 is it possible to overload an operator to fix that? –  Matthew Pigram Feb 27 at 22:26
    
@MatthewPigram You could define conversion operators for your own classes (but not for std::string), but in general that just begs the question what to convert them to. The whole point of the C++ switch statement is utmost efficiency; this is why you only get to compare against compile-time constants, and integer ones at that. When testing for non-integral values, use another tool, such as a series of if tests or a container lookup. –  user4815162342 Feb 27 at 22:49

In C++11 a brief way to express this is by using the brace-init syntax to construct a set, and calling std::set::count to test if the element is present:

if (std::set<EnumVariable>{a, g, t, i}.count(myVariable))
  ...

A compilable example:

#include <set>

enum EnumVariable {a, b, d, g, f, t, k, i};

int main()
{
  EnumVariable x = t;
  if (std::set<EnumVariable>{a, g, t, i}.count(x)) {
    return 0;
  }
  return 1;
}

Note about efficiency: since the question asked about a "comparison operator", the answer is written with the goal of providing a fairly readable and brief single expression that does not require a separate utility function. Since it builds a temporary std::set, it is not nearly as efficient as a switch statement, which is compiled into tests or jump tables by all relevant compilers.

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2  
It could be faster for large sets. The look-up is order log(N). One would have to measure, etc. etc. –  juanchopanza Feb 26 at 8:17
5  
@juanchopanza: if the set was created once and re-used then fair enough, but not a chance when each element is put in a temporary set as per this answer (at this time) - each elements needs a dynamic memory allocation and deallocation. –  Tony D Feb 26 at 8:22
2  
The issue is not only the allocation, but building the set takes time n*log(n), so you really want to have a lot more than 1 test to do on this set to make it worth it. –  Marc Glisse Feb 26 at 8:25
4  
To be used into such a condition, I would rather have a make_set function to deduce the template parameter. It would be less verbose. –  Morwenn Feb 26 at 8:27
2  
@juanchopanza Large sets are unlikely for a set of enums literally listed in the source code, as is the case here. Even then, the compiler could also generate very efficient jump tables for large switch statements (and in fact many compilers are known to do exactly that). –  user4815162342 Feb 26 at 9:31

Yet-another approach is to use a template to specify the list to match in, which for your enum case will presumably be known at compile time (otherwise even the switch approach is inapplicable). This allows a notation like:

if (in<a, b, c, d, e, f>(x))
    ...

With optimisation enabled, this should be inlined and yield something equivalent to:

a == x || b == x || ...

Implemention below (also ideone). I've not played with variadic templates much, so suggestions welcome. In particular, how to make it type-safe so given enum E { E1 }; enum F { F1 };, in<E1>(F1) won't compile (without limiting it to a specific enum type).

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <int First, int... Numbers>
inline bool in_impl(int n)
{
    return n == First || in_impl<Numbers...>(n);
}

template <>
inline bool in_impl<int(-1)>(int n)
{
    return false;
}

template <int... Numbers>
inline bool in(int n) 
{
    return in_impl<Numbers..., int(-1)>(n);
}

enum E { E1, E2, E3, E4 };

int main()
{
    std::cout << in<3, 5, 7, 9>(4) << '\n';
    std::cout << in<3, 5, 7, 9>(5) << '\n';
    std::cout << in<E2, E4>(E1) << '\n';
    std::cout << in<E2, E4>(E2) << '\n';
}

Output:

0
1
0
1
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1  
I'm surprised nobody else suggested using variadic templates, this method was the first thing to come to mind as I read through the question. Maybe that's just because I recently dove into using the template-heavy boost libraries and so the idea of using templates for a variety of purposes that people might not normally think of is fresh in my mind, though. –  JAB Feb 26 at 15:55
    
With more effort, it is possible to have logarithm search instead of linear one. –  Jarod42 Feb 26 at 15:57
    
@JAB I was also surprised nobody posted before me... I was pretty slow getting it going too. –  Tony D Feb 26 at 16:06
    
@Jarod42 Or, if the enum is restricted to bitflags as in Sigismondo's answer, the operation would become a simple bitwise check rather than a search (assuming proper optimizations enabled). There could even be an auxiliary template to map non-bitflags enums to, say, std::bitsets bit fields and then perform the bit masking that way. –  JAB Feb 26 at 16:14
    
@Jarod42: true, though very considerably more effort - particularly if starting from only Standard libraries - do knock yourself out if you've got the time and inclination. I suppose the compiler could detect that there are no side effects that short-circuit evaluation needs to protect against, and potentially optimise the above to something logarithmic too, but that's probably overly hopeful. –  Tony D Feb 26 at 16:19

this is often/usually accomplished using bit fields in an enum (clearly, up to the number of bits of an integral type (usually 32 bits), that is the default type at the base of an enum):

#include <iostream>

enum EnumVariable {
  a=0x0001, 
  b=0x0002, 
  d=0x0004, 
  g=0x0008, 
  f=0x0010, 
  t=0x0020, 
  k=0x0040, 
  i=0x0080
};

inline bool CheckMatch(EnumVariable var, EnumVariable mask) {
  return (var & mask) != 0;
}

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  EnumVariable mask = EnumVariable(a|g|t|i);
  EnumVariable x1 = b;
  EnumVariable x2 = g;

  cout << "x1: " << (CheckMatch(x1, mask) ? "match" : "no-match") << endl;
  cout << "x2: " << (CheckMatch(x2, mask) ? "match" : "no-match") << endl;

}

that shortly can be seen just as:

if ( x1 & (a|g|t|i) ) {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 really good solution, don't know why this one is not accepted. –  ST3 Mar 26 at 11:45

There is not the same, compact syntax, but you can use std::find with an std::initializer_list. For example,

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

enum EnumVariable {a, b, d, g, f, t, k, i};

int main()
{
  EnumVariable e = k;
  auto vals = { a, g, t, i }; // std::initializer_list<EnumVariable>
  std::cout << std::boolalpha;
  std::cout << (std::find(vals.begin(), vals.end(), e) != vals.end()) << std::endl;
}

This can easily be wrapper up in a helper function that takes the enum value, the list, and returns a bool. For example:

template <typename T>
bool is_in(T elem, std::initializer_list<T> range)
{
 for (T i : range)
    if (i == elem) return true;
 return false;

}

usage:

int main()
{
  EnumVariable ev = a;
  std::cout << std::boolalpha;
  std::cout << is_in(ev, {a, g, t, i}) << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If the range is large and sorted, then std::binary_search may be an even better option than std::find. In such case, add assert(std::is_sorted(range.begin(), range.end())); as a requirement to is_in. –  dalle Feb 27 at 9:43

It's absolutely not idiomatic, and probably to avoid, but the closest you can have (syntactically speaking) is to use named operators. Named operators actually correspond to an abuse of operator overloading.

enum EnumVariable {a, b, d, g, f, t, k, i};

auto in = make_named_operator(
[](int i, std::initializer_list<EnumVariable> const& x) {
    return std::find(std::begin(x), std::end(x), i) != std::end(x);
});

auto vals = { a, g, t, i };
if (g <in> vals)
{
    std::cout << "It works!" << std::endl;
}

Here is a working example on Coliru.


If you use C++14 and polymorphic lambdas (currently available with clang++), you can make the above example more generic:

auto in = make_named_operator(
[](int i, auto const& x) {
    return std::find(std::begin(x), std::end(x), i) != std::end(x);
});
share|improve this answer
    
(Bit of an aside: the term "named operator" is already in long-established use in GCC docs to refer to the alphabetic alternative tokens such as and, or, not, xor_eq etc..) –  Tony D Feb 26 at 16:46
    
@TonyD Well, I did not create the name unfortunately, and I have no idea how I should call this construct then (besides "evil"). By the way, the link you provided is dead. –  Morwenn Feb 27 at 8:50

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