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I've written a simple class (for want of a better word) in JavaScript. The class creates two accessor (get/set) properties called foo and bar, and two methods called setProperty and getProperty.

The get/set methods for the properties call getProperty and setProperty, which in turn, get and set the properties from the properties object.

I would expect to see infinite recursion here, where the properties are calling the methods, which are calling the properties, which are calling the methods...etc.

But it works...and I'm mind boggled as to how, and where the values are being stored!

Example code

var Test = (function () {
    return function Test() {
        var $this = this,
            properties = {
                foo: {
                    get: function () { return $this.getProperty("foo"); },
                    set: function (value) { $this.setProperty("foo", value); },
                    enumerable: false,
                    configurable: false
                },
                bar: {
                    get: function () { return $this.getProperty("bar"); },
                    set: function (value) { $this.setProperty("bar", value); },
                    enumerable: false,
                    configurable: false
                }
            };

        Object.defineProperties(this, properties);

        this.getProperty = function (name) {
            console.log("get was definitely called!");
            return properties[name];
        };

        this.setProperty = function (name, value) {
            console.log("set was definitely called!");
            properties[name] = value;
        };
    };
})();

var test = new Test();
//undefined
test.foo = "Hello World";
//set was definitely called!
//"Hello World"
test.bar = 3;
//set was definitely called!
//3
test.foo;
//get was definitely called!
//"Hello World"
test.bar;
//get was definitely called!
//3

Very interested to know why I'm not just getting a "too much recursion" error!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you are calling defineProperties, you are creating properties in the test object, not properties in the properties object.

The properties object is not used as properties any more, only reused as storage for the property values. Setting the foo property will replace the property definition in the property object with the value.

When you set the test.foo property, that will call the setter code for the property and store the value in the properties object, but that doesn't affect the test.foo property. Once the properties are created, the object that was used to define them is not used any more.

The code is a bit confusing, as it first uses the properties object as definition for the properties, then reuses it for storage of property values. If you use two separate objects for this, it's clearer why setting a property doesn't affect the property itself:

var Test = (function () {
    return function Test() {
        var $this = this,
            def = {
                foo: {
                    get: function () { return $this.getProperty("foo"); },
                    set: function (value) { $this.setProperty("foo", value); },
                    enumerable: false,
                    configurable: false
                },
                bar: {
                    get: function () { return $this.getProperty("bar"); },
                    set: function (value) { $this.setProperty("bar", value); },
                    enumerable: false,
                    configurable: false
                }
            },
            storage = {};

        Object.defineProperties(this, def);

        this.getProperty = function (name) {
            console.log("get was definitely called!");
            return storage[name];
        };

        this.setProperty = function (name, value) {
            console.log("set was definitely called!");
            storage[name] = value;
        };
    };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Hit the nail on the head...great answer; It all makes sense now! –  series0ne Feb 26 at 11:10

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