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Consider this example of code:

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main ( )
{
   using namespace std::chrono;

   system_clock::time_point s = system_clock::now();

   for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i)
      std::cout << duration_cast<duration<double>>(system_clock::now() - s).count() << "\n";
}

I expect this to print the elapsed time in seconds. But it actually prints time in thousands of second (the expected result multiplied by 0.001). Am I doing something wrong?

Edit

Since seconds is equivalent to duration<some-int-type>, duration_cast<seconds> gives the same result.

I used gcc-4.7.3-r1

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If you want seconds, you need to duration_cast<boost::chrono::seconds> –  Dave F Feb 26 at 11:19
    
@DaveF: Only if you want to round to a whole number of seconds, since seconds is a convenience typedef for duration<some_integer_type>. duration<double> should also have a period of one second. –  Mike Seymour Feb 26 at 11:21
    
I tried it in VS2013 - works fine –  GabiMe Feb 26 at 11:39
    
How are you determining that it's printing milliseconds? If I compile and run that code, and watch the output, it increases by 1 each second as expected (that's with a slightly different version of GCC though). –  Mike Seymour Feb 26 at 11:39
6  
This may help. –  maverik Feb 26 at 11:43

2 Answers 2

You program works as expected using both gcc 4.8.2 and VS2013. I think it might be a compiler bug in your old gcc 4.7

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You could use duration_cast < seconds > instead of duration_cast < duration < double > >

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seconds is just a typedef for duration<some_integer_type>. duration<double> should also have a period of one second. –  Mike Seymour Feb 26 at 11:22
    
I've already tried. seconds seem to act exactly like duration<int, ratio<1>>, and duration_cast<milliseconds>(...) in fact gives me seconds. –  lisyarus Feb 26 at 11:23
    
I get different results when using Ideone with C++11 compiler between the two(seconds and duration<double>). Seconds only prints seconds(at least on that compiler). I cant test it on any other compiler atm however –  const_ref Feb 26 at 11:26

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