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I have some function objects, each of which defines various two-argument overloads of operator():

class Foo {};
class Bar {};

struct Functor1 {
    double operator()(const Foo &, const Bar &)  { return 2.2; }
    double operator()(const Bar &, const Foo &)  { return 3.1; }
};

struct Functor2 {
    int operator()(const Foo &, const Foo &)  { return 2; }
    int operator()(const Bar &, const Bar &)  { return 3; }
};

Now what I want to do is write a utility that lets me attach these functors, one by one, to a binary operator. Here is my attempt:

#define ATTACH_FUNCTOR_TO_OPERATOR(OPERATOR, FUNCTOR) \
    template<typename Operand1, typename Operand2> \
    decltype(FUNCTOR(std::declval<Operand1>(), std::declval<Operand2>())) \
    operator OPERATOR(const Operand1 &operand1, const Operand2 &operand2) { \
        return FUNCTOR(operand1, operand2); \
    }

It works okay the first time:

ATTACH_FUNCTOR_TO_OPERATOR(+, Functor1());

but when I add a second invocation with the same operator:

ATTACH_FUNCTOR_TO_OPERATOR(+, Functor2());

then Visual Studio 2013 tells me "function template has already been defined".

Notice that, for any pair of operands, there is only one instance of + whose return type decltype(FUNCTOR(std::declval<Operand1>(), std::declval<Operand2>())) can be resolved to any particular type. I expected any other attempted instantiations to fail silently and not cause any trouble -- aka SFINAE.

I have also tried various styles of enable_if, without success.

Is there a legal way to do this in standard C++11?

Is there a way that works in VS2013?

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Maybe I'm wrong but shouldn't it be ATTACH_FUNCTOR_TO_OPERATOR(+, Functor1) (without parentheses)? –  Excelcius Feb 26 '14 at 12:10
    
Nevermind, I misread the code. Could be a compiler bug.. –  Excelcius Feb 26 '14 at 12:26

2 Answers 2

This is a known bug in VC++. We can reduce it to the following self-contained example:

template<typename T> void f(decltype(T::a)) {}
template<typename T> void f(decltype(T::b)) {}

source_file.cpp(2) : error C2995: 'void f(unknown-type)' : function template has already been defined source_file.cpp(1) : see declaration of 'f'

The issue appears to be that VC++ considers "unknown-type" types (i.e., those from decltype) to be equivalent for the purpose of determining whether a function template definition is a redefinition.

One workaround is to disambiguate the templates with a unique, unused type:

#define ATTACH_FUNCTOR_TO_OPERATOR(OPERATOR, FUNCTOR) \
    template<typename Operand1, typename Operand2> \
    typename std::conditional<true, \
        decltype(FUNCTOR(std::declval<Operand1>(), std::declval<Operand2>())), \
        std::integral_constant<int, __LINE__>>::type \
    operator OPERATOR(const Operand1 & operand1, const Operand2 &operand2) { \
        return FUNCTOR(operand1, operand2); \
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I thought about using tag dispatching to disambiguate, but for some reason I though it wouldn't work with the operator in the OPs code. Nice workaround, bad bug :) –  Excelcius Feb 26 '14 at 13:49
1  
And once again, as your link to Microsoft connect shows, Microsoft seems to be ignoring the issue. –  Excelcius Feb 26 '14 at 13:51
    
Thanks for this answer. It solved the problem as stated, however it leads to failures at sites where I try to use the operator normally, i.e. where it doesn't match any of my own overloads. I will work on constructing some clean example code. –  slyqualin Feb 26 '14 at 22:29
    
Update: it's all good. I just need to stick very close to what you've written. (I had been defining the result type as a defaulted third template parameter on line one of the macro, and using that template param as the return type on line 2; and I added your std::conditional maneouvre on line 2. That wasn't close enough.) –  slyqualin Feb 26 '14 at 23:53

The following simplified sample compiles fine in ideone and returns the right results, so I can only imagine it to be some kind of VS2013 bug. However I'm no C++-standard expert so I don't know if the compiler is required to handle this scenario.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
using namespace std;

class Foo {};
class Bar {};

struct Functor1
{
    static double functor(const Foo &) { return 2.2; }
};

struct Functor2
{
    static int functor(const Bar &) { return 3; }
};

template<typename Operand>
auto test(const Operand &operand) -> decltype(Functor1::functor(operand))
{
    return Functor1::functor(operand);
}

template<typename Operand>
auto test(const Operand &operand) -> decltype(Functor2::functor(operand))
{
    return Functor2::functor(operand);
}

int main()
{
    cout << test(Foo()) << endl << test(Bar());
    return 0;
}

If I compile it in VS2013 I get the same error: "function template has already been defined". This error shows up even when the template is never instantiated in the whole program. I can only assume the compiler doesn't even try to find the right overload.

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to come up with a solution yet, using enable_if seems to fail out of the same reasons.

See also: http://ideone.com/JbDKDF

Edit

I found a similar question with a very interesting answer:

VS2012 SP1 (+november pack) unknown-type errors (alike C::a(T &&...) )

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