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I'm trying to count the amount of times a character in a single line appears to then edit the lines which it does.

Say i have a line that goes:

\serv\file\subfile\subsubfile\subsubsubfile

Is there any way I can count the amount of times the \ character appears, and if it doesn't appear more than say twice, clear the line and leave it blank?

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Sorry about that. I just see now, after trying the different answers and actually sitting down trying to learn Regular Expression that I might not have asked the right question for what I wanted to achieve. I figured this expression would do the trick for what I was after '^(\\([^\\])*?){1,5}$' – KjetilJar Feb 28 '14 at 14:29
    
All the answers, unfortunately, give regexes that replace lines with less than 2 backslashes. I want to know a way to effectively get the count of a character within a certain line. This could have been a good question, but why did you have to go and ask 2 questions in one... Your second question has nothing to do with the title. – MDeSchaepmeester May 13 '14 at 8:13
    
I thought the outcome I was after was easier to get than it was. So I, in a moment of laziness, asked before really trying. When I then started going through the different suggestions I realized that I had to do it in a different way. So I sat for a day or so to actually learn RegEx and found out that my initial way of thinking couldn't really be done using RegEx. The second question was mainly just to see if there was a way to manipulate the lines which meat the RegEx match. Were you interested in finding a way to count certain occurrences of something in a line? @MDeSchaepmeester – KjetilJar May 21 '14 at 14:30
    
I was, not any longer though but if you know how please let me know! – MDeSchaepmeester May 21 '14 at 16:57
up vote 3 down vote accepted

find ^([^\\]*[\\]?[^\\]*){0,2}$

replace with empty string

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Just out of curiosity, why did you delete and undelete your answer? – The Guy with The Hat Feb 26 '14 at 14:21
1  
@TheGuywithTheHat I first posted my answer for "empty the line for appearing more than twice", which was the opposite of OP's requirement. After I re-read the question. I gave this answer. – Kent Feb 27 '14 at 14:43

Is this something that you want to do?

Find - ^(?!.*\\.*\\.*\\.*).*$\r\n

Replace -

enter image description here

When you do Replace All, you would also get the number of lines that were replaced - giving you the count

In my example, the 2nd, 4th, and 5th lines would be deleted because they have less than 2 slashes ()

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Won't work. Try it with \serv\file as the only line. – The Guy with The Hat Feb 26 '14 at 13:43
    
@TheGuywithTheHat - Yup, but should work if the line contains a newline char. – Pankaj Jaju Feb 26 '14 at 13:54
    
But if the line doesn't contain a newline char, it won't work! Also, It only works on Windows, not Mac, Linux, etc. (In most cases) – The Guy with The Hat Feb 26 '14 at 14:03
    
Ahh ... didn't thought about other OSes – Pankaj Jaju Feb 26 '14 at 14:42
    
Well it works (for me at least using windows), but how would i not delete the line but insert a blank one instead? – KjetilJar Feb 26 '14 at 14:55

Try this regex:

^[^\\]*\\[^\\](?:*\\[^\\]*)?$

Replace with nothing. Explanation and demonstration here: http://regex101.com/r/qW0jE3

If you want to change the number of \s allowed, you have three options:

  • Change the number of (?:*\\[^\\]*) in the above regex.
  • Change the second number in this regex: ^(?:[^\\]*\\[^\\]*){0,2}$.
  • Change the first number in this regex: ^(?:\\?[^\\]*){2}$.
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