Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I made a function that returns a vector with all the prime factors of an integer, and I am trying to make another function that creates a map from that vector.

However, I am getting some typicall illegal memory access error and I cannot find what it is. I think it happens inside the for loop of the map<int, int> factorizacion(vector<int>) function.

I hope I could get some help here.

I could post the whole program but I'll just stick to the function that's causing the issue. Just ask for the rest of the code in case you need to give it a look.

map<int, int> factorizacion(vector<int> v) {
    map<int, int> m;

    while (!v.empty()) {
        int elto = v.front();
        int ctd = 0;

        for (vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
            if (*it == elto) {
                ++ctd;
                v.erase(it);
            }
        }
        m[elto] = ctd;
    }

    return m;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Erasing from the vector makes your iterators invalid and leads to undefined behaviour –  Niklas B. Feb 26 at 14:48
    
2  
The same thing can be achieved using multiset(v.begin(),v.end()), by the way, or by a simple for (int x: v) m[x]++; –  Niklas B. Feb 26 at 14:49
    
@NiklasB. Worth mentioning that the enhanced for works only in C++11 –  Boris Strandjev Feb 26 at 14:59
1  
@dabadaba: Yeah, map iterators don't support random access obviously. You can just use the example implementation from cppreference if you really want to. But I would rather do something like bool first = 1; for (map<int,int>::iterator it = m.begin(); it != m.end(); ++it) { if (!first) cout << " + "; first = 0; cout << it->fst << "^" << it->snd; } otherwise you need to duplicate the loop body. You should also consider using C++11 if you have the choice. –  Niklas B. Feb 26 at 15:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You modify a collection you iterate upon:

for (vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
    if (*it == elto) {
        ++ctd;
        v.erase(it);
    }
}

If you erase the item pointed by the iterator you can not just continue using the same iterator.

Btw you can make use of the fact that map will automatically initialize to 0 a value for key that does not exist.

This code will do what you want:

map<int, int> m;
for (int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++) {
  m[v[i]]++;
}

The only thing is that performance-wise my solution is a bit slower - it executes more queries than the optimal solution. However, the solution I propose is better that yours (when it gets fixed, because):

  • Erasing in a vector is costly operation and takes linear time, a lot worse performance wise than my map tweak
  • I do not alter the parameter of the method. I know it is not passed in by reference but it is always a good idea not to affect parameters when this is possible.
share|improve this answer

v.erase(it) makes it invalid. You need to change your loop:

for (vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end();) {
    if (*it == elto) {
        ++ctd;
        it = v.erase(it);
    } else {
       ++it;
    }
}

Or better, use std::remove and .erase similarly to the "erase-remove" idiom. Which I won't repeat here because you can look it up. You can compute the count as the difference between two iterators.

Or even better, count the factors without erasing them at all, as in Niklas's comment.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, now it works. But can you explain why my program gave an error and why those changes need to be done? –  dabadaba Feb 26 at 15:37
    
@dabadaba: "v.erase(it) makes it invalid" is the explanation why your program is undefined and the proposed code sample in this answer contains the changes that need to be done. –  Niklas B. Feb 26 at 15:48
    
oooh so it is somewhat flagged? –  dabadaba Feb 26 at 15:53
    

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.