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Let me preference that I mostly develop in C# and the C++ development which I have done did not fully leverage the C++ language. I am now trying to use the language as it was intended and I am pulling my hair out with const declarations in passed arguments. In the past I never used them or hacked my way into making them work with the STL.

My understanding that I would create the following function when I want to use o as readonly in the function:

void foo(const MyClass* o);

So here is my problem...code first:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Classes are defined in the one file for an easy post.

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

class ClassA {
private: // member variables
    string m_name;

public: // constructors
    ClassA(const string& name = "") : m_name{name} {}
    virtual ~ClassA() { }

public: // accessors
    const string& name() const { return m_name; }
    void setName(const string& value) { m_name = value; }   
};

class ClassB {
private: // member variables
    string m_name;
    ClassA m_child;

public: // constructors
    ClassB(const string& name = "") : m_name{name} {}
    virtual ~ClassB() { }

public: // accessors
    const string& name() const { return m_name; }
    void setName(const string& value) { m_name = value; }

    ClassA* child() { return &m_child; }
    void setChild(const ClassA* value) { m_child = *value; }
};

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Protoptypes are not used to save space for the post.

void doSomethingA(const ClassA* o) {
   cout << "name = " << o->name() << endl << endl;
}

void doSomethingB(const ClassB* o) {
   cout << "name = " << o->name() << endl << endl;
   doSomethingA(o->child());
}

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    ClassA a { "My Class A" };
    ClassB b { "My Class B" };


    b.setChild(&a);
    b.child()->setName("My New Name");
    doSomethingB(&b);
    return 0;
}

In main() the compiler (g++ version 4.7.2) balks in doSomethingB:

doSomethingA(o->child());

with error: passing 'const ClassB' as 'this' argument of 'ClassA* ClassB::child()' discards qualifiers [-fpermissive]

Now I am passing my classes to functions as pointers. I plan on always using pointers because I have a problem with the reference/pointer options. I'm choosing one, pointers, and sticking with it. So doSomethingA and doSomethingB I want that to be const to tell the programmer that their class is not being altered. But I only want one version of child() which I want to use sometimes as "read only" and other times allow the user to change the data within the child object (not the best method, I grant that, but there are some use cases where I need this). I even tried:

doSomethingA(const_cast<const ClassA*>(o->child()));

But that did not work.

In the past I removed the const declarations in the functions to make something like this work but now I want to use proper c++. Help please.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried making the child() function const? – Biffen Feb 26 '14 at 17:15
4  
"I plan on always using pointers because I have a problem with the reference/pointer options." just buys you a heap of problems. don't do that. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 26 '14 at 17:16
2  
If you just use pointers, you have to constantly check for null pointers. If you use references, no. So the simple rule is: if you want to support null pointers, use pointers, otherwise references. Using pointers everywhere means that you'll never be able to pass a temporary. – James Kanze Feb 26 '14 at 17:21
    
Note, this problem would not have occurred if you used the language as it was intended (references) – Mooing Duck Feb 26 '14 at 17:27
    
nullptr is good if used properly. I'm use to that with C# and null. – zam664 Feb 26 '14 at 18:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're attempting to access a non-const function against a const object. You need to make the function const :

const ClassA* child() const { return &m_child; }

You can also provide a const and non-const version:

ClassA* child() { return &m_child; }
const ClassA* child() const { return &m_child; }

This way you can call non-const methods on ClassA when you have a non-const object.

share|improve this answer
    
Notably, this isn't necessary if he used references instead of pointers – Mooing Duck Feb 26 '14 at 17:26
    
Same problem with references. I did not know you could do that. I thought that followed the rule where you cannot overload a function with the only difference being the return type. Like int foo(); and double foo(); are not allowed. What I now don't understand is int foo() and const int foo() are also not allowed. Why is it different as a member function. – zam664 Feb 26 '14 at 18:35

try

ClassA* child() const { return &m_child; }

or

const ClassA* child() const { return &m_child; }

to keep the const correctness

Also, you don't need to use pointers as long as you don't plan passing nullptr. So you can do the following:

void doSomethingB(const ClassB& o);

// in class ClassB
const ClassA& child() const { return m_child; }
ClassA& child() { return m_child; }

References still alow polymorphic stuff same way as pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
The return type would have to be a const pointer too. For other parts of the OP's code to work, child would have to be overloaded on const. – Fred Larson Feb 26 '14 at 17:17

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