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I'm working on some scientific code that is mostly F77 but also some F95. In places, I need to include F77 code into my F95 code. Is there a way to get this code to play nicely within my code by using a particular compiler flag or something? I'm using gfortran and occasionally ifort. It is possible for me to modify the legacy code but I would need to do it in a sensible way to maintain backwards compatibility with other F77 code while also being forwards compatible with F95 code.

I get errors like:

cstruc:16.12:
    Included at mod_op.f90:6:

      REAL*8
            1
Error: Invalid character in name at (1)
cstruc:17.6:
    Included at mod_op.f90:6:

     &       RH, RH1,      ! ln rho
      1
Error: Invalid character in name at (1)
cstruc:18.6:
    Included at mod_op.f90:6:

     &       RHP, RHP1,    ! d ln rho / d ln p
      1
Error: Invalid character in name at (1)
cstruc:19.6:
    Included at mod_op.f90:6:

     &       RHT, RHT1,    ! d ln rho / d ln T
      1
Error: Invalid character in name at (1)

cstruc looks like this:

  REAL*8
 &       RH, RH1,      ! ln rho
 &       RHP, RHP1,    ! d ln rho / d ln p
 &       RHT, RHT1,    ! d ln rho / d ln T
 &       PSI,          ! ln Lambda (for degenerate gas)
 &       RHPSI,        ! d ln rho / d PSI
 &       RHPSIP,       ! d2 ln rho / d PSI d ln P
 &       RHPSIT,       ! d2 ln rho / d PSI d ln T
 &       PL,           ! P at J1
 &       TONI          ! T at J1

Any help is much appreciated. Thanks!

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2  
The problem shouldn't be F77 vs F95, but free format vs. fixed format. –  Vladimir F Feb 26 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With some exceptions, Fortran 77 code is Fortran 95 code. I guess that your errors come from that you are attempting to include fixed-form source code (your F77 code in cstruc) into a free-form source code file mod_op.f90. This is unlikely to end well.

Most compilers will assume a file ending in ".f90" is free-form, so if you really are using fixed-form then you will need a compiler flag to override the assumption.

It is possible to combine free- and fixed-form code into a final object (each compiled separately), but a good suggestion as to how to resolve the problems you are seeing can come only with more detail.

However, if you are attempting with your include to create a module to replace a common block, then there is no reason why you can't use the F95 feature with fixed-form. Just do that selectively.

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Ooh, interesting.. So if I just write the code in fixed form but compile as Fortran 90/95, it should be alright..I tried to convert my code completely to F77 but then I realised that I needed the modern features. I'll give that a try tomorrow :) Thanks! –  Durand Feb 26 at 23:51
    
This worked perfectly, thanks! –  Durand Feb 28 at 15:04

I suggest to try the "intersection" form from http://fortranwiki.org/fortran/show/Continuation+lines

It is legal as both free and fixed source form.

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That's a good point. Coupled with changing any column-1 "C" to "!" that should cover most of the non-crazy form differences. –  francescalus Feb 26 at 17:58
    
I came across this but it didn't quite work for some reason. I'll try it again though. Thanks! –  Durand Feb 26 at 23:53

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