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I would like to implement an auto-updater in a shell script. This script would update itself first, then it would go on with the rest of updates.

I believe this is possible using the exec command in Linux, but it seems to me that this is just calling a new script and not stopping the termination of the old one.

Can you tell me why do I have an error in the following scenario.

exectestA.sh

#!/bin/sh

echo "a1"
sleep 1
cp exectestB.sh exectest.sh
echo "a2"
sleep 1
exec ./exectest.sh
echo "a3"
sleep 1

exectestB.sh

#!/bin/sh

echo "b1"
sleep 1
echo "b2"
sleep 1
cp exectestA.sh exectest.sh
echo "b3"
sleep 1

start command

cp exectestA.sh exectest.sh
./exectest.sh

output on my machine

a1
a2
b1
b2
b3
./exectest.sh: 13: ./exectest.sh: ho: not found

If the cp isn't present in exectestB there are no problems (it terminates after b3).

Although I understand that for a normal update process the cp in B shouldn't be needed, I would like to understand why including cp in B results in an error to avoid possible bugs in the future.

At the moment, it seems to me that execA keeps running after it called execB. Is this the case, and if so how can I avoid it?

Note: it seems to depend on the length of the B script. The outcome changes if I insert empty lines at the beginning of the B script.

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Avoid updating the current shell script.... –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 26 '14 at 19:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The behaviour you're seeing is certainly not guaranteed, particularly since you have /bin/sh in the shebang line. On some systems, /bin/sh is not bash, and may not behave in the same way.

bash attempts to deal with self-modifying scripts by remembering the current position in the scriptfile before executing a command, and seeking back to that position before reading the next command. (Roughly speaking. The code is a bit more complicated and there are a lot of corner cases. And it won't work if the scriptfile is not a real file, so that seeking is impossible.) So after you overwrite the executing script file, execution will continue at the same character offset in the new file. In order for this to be meaningful, you have to make sure that the new file has exactly the same prefix (or at least, a prefix of exactly the same length) as the old file.

It is possible to do an update without relying on bash internals, by doing the cp and the exec in the same command:

cp exectestB.sh exectest.sh && exec ./exectest.sh

Remember that exec never returns, so the next command (if there is one) will only be executed if either the cp or the exec failed.

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Thanks, I found out that it is indeed related to bash vs. dash. This test case behaves very differently on dash vs. bash. pastie.org/8804637 –  zsero Feb 27 '14 at 11:30

exectestB.sh is overriding itself (it is exectest.sh when it is executed) with the copy command. This is not possible. The script continues to be read. exectestA.sh should execute the command 'echo', but because of the character offset 'ho' is read, which is not a command.

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My first reaction is that this sounds like an XY Problem. What are you really trying to achieve?

That said, your success with this depends on exactly what interpreter you're using. While you've tagged your question bash, you're executing the script as #!/bin/sh.

When I run your test using bash, I get similar results. But when I run it using /bin/sh that comes with FreeBSD, I get something that looks more like success:

0 ghoti@pc:~/tmp 6> ./exectest.sh
a1
a2
b1
b2
b3
a3
0 ghoti@pc:~/tmp 7> 

Remember that the purpose of exec is to "replace" the current process image with a new process image. The behaviour of the exec shell command in bash is to "replace the shell", according to the man page.

I think you'll have the best results if you don't try to replace the script that's actually running. For example:

#!/bin/bash

echo "A1 - $0"
sleep 1
echo "A2"
sleep 1
me=$(basename $0); me=A-${me##?-}
tr 'AB' 'BA' < $0 > $me
chmod +x $me
exec ./$me
echo "A3"
sleep 1

... which for me gives the following repeating results:

0 ghoti@pc:~/tmp 17> ./exectest.sh
A1 - ./exectest.sh
A2
B1 - /home/ghoti/tmp/A-exectest.sh
B2
A1 - /home/ghoti/tmp/B-exectest.sh
A2
B1 - /home/ghoti/tmp/A-exectest.sh
B2
A1 - /home/ghoti/tmp/B-exectest.sh
^C
1 ghoti@pc:~/tmp 18> 

This bounces back and forth between A and B scripts, never reaching A3 because each script is executed from the beginning rather than from the offset within the script that you're overwriting.

Is that what you're looking for?

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