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I'm running glibc version 2.19, and i am getting a segmentation fault inside malloc.

here is the piece of code in which segmentation fault happens

job = malloc(sizeof(task_t));
if(job == NULL)
    perror("malloc");

the perror appears not to be called.

To be more precise, gdb says that the segfault happens inside the __int_malloc call.

now, my problem is that the segmentation fault happens inside the malloc, and i've been debugging this for too long, so i decided to post it here. The malloc function is called in parallel with other threads. im running version 2.19 of glibc.

The data structures:

typedef struct rv_thread thread_wrapper_t;

typedef struct future
{
  pthread_cond_t wait;
  pthread_mutex_t mutex;
  long completed;
} future_t;

typedef struct task
{
  future_t * f;
  void * data;
  void *
  (*fun)(thread_wrapper_t *, void *);
} task_t;

typedef struct
{
  queue_t * queue;
} pool_worker_t;

typedef struct
{
  task_t * t;
} sfuture_t;

struct rv_thread
{
  pool_worker_t * pool;
};

Now the future implementation:

future_t *
create_future()
{
  future_t * new_f = malloc(sizeof(future_t));
  if(new_f == NULL)
    perror("malloc");
  new_f->completed = 0;
  pthread_mutex_init(&(new_f->mutex), NULL);
  pthread_cond_init(&(new_f->wait), NULL);
  return new_f;
}

int
wait_future(future_t * f)
{
  pthread_mutex_lock(&(f->mutex));
  while (!f->completed)
    {
      pthread_cond_wait(&(f->wait),&(f->mutex));
    }
  pthread_mutex_unlock(&(f->mutex));
  return 0;
}

void
complete(future_t * f)
{
  pthread_mutex_lock(&(f->mutex));
  f->completed = 1;
  pthread_mutex_unlock(&(f->mutex));
  pthread_cond_broadcast(&(f->wait));
}

The thread pool itself:

pool_worker_t *
create_work_pool(int threads)
{
  pool_worker_t * new_p = malloc(sizeof(pool_worker_t));
  if(new_p == NULL)
    perror("malloc");
  threads = 1;
  new_p->queue = create_queue();
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < threads; i++){
    thread_wrapper_t * w = malloc(sizeof(thread_wrapper_t));
    if(w == NULL)
      perror("malloc");
    w->pool = new_p;
    pthread_t n;
    pthread_create(&n, NULL, work, w);
  }
  return new_p;
}

task_t *
try_get_new_task(thread_wrapper_t * thr)
{
  task_t * t = NULL;
  try_dequeue(thr->pool->queue, t);
  return t;
}

void
submit_job(pool_worker_t * p, task_t * t)
{
  enqueue(p->queue, t);
}

void *
work(void * data)
{
  thread_wrapper_t * thr = (thread_wrapper_t *) data;
  while (1){
    task_t * t = NULL;
    while ((t = (task_t *) try_get_new_task(thr)) == NULL);
    future_t * f = t->f;
    (*(t->fun))(thr,t->data);
    complete(f);
  }
  pthread_exit(NULL);
}

And finally the task.c:

pool_worker_t *
create_tpool()
{
  return (create_work_pool(8));
}

sfuture_t *
async(pool_worker_t * p, thread_wrapper_t * thr, void *
(*fun)(thread_wrapper_t *, void *), void * data)
{
  task_t * job = NULL;
  job = malloc(sizeof(task_t));
  if(job == NULL)
    perror("malloc");
  job->data = data;
  job->fun = fun;
  job->f = create_future();
  submit_job(p, job);
  sfuture_t * new_t = malloc(sizeof(sfuture_t));
  if(new_t == NULL)
    perror("malloc");
  new_t->t = job;
  return (new_t);
}

void
mywait(thread_wrapper_t * thr, sfuture_t * sf)
{
  if (sf == NULL)
    return;
  if (thr != NULL)
    {
      while (!sf->t->f->completed)
        {
          task_t * t_n = try_get_new_task(thr);
          if (t_n != NULL)
            {
          future_t * f = t_n->f;
          (*(t_n->fun))(thr,t_n->data);
          complete(f);
            }
        }
      return;
    }
  wait_future(sf->t->f);
  return ;
}

The queue is based on lfds lock free queue. however i try to maintain everything modular. here is the "modularization"

#define enqueue(q,t) {                      \
    if(!lfds611_queue_enqueue(q->lq, t))            \
      {                             \
        lfds611_queue_guaranteed_enqueue(q->lq, t);     \
      }                             \
  }

#define try_dequeue(q,t) {          \
    lfds611_queue_dequeue(q->lq, &t);       \
  }

any idea?

PS: I would never post the code, in normal situations, but i've been trying to find the bug dor more than 2 months, and so, here it is.

And this happens whenever the number of calls to async is very high.

Valgrind output:

Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV)
==12022==  Bad permissions for mapped region at address 0x5AF9FF8
==12022==    at 0x4C28737: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)

also, just to remove some possible solutions, i also call the lfds611_queue_use(q) from every thread

This is probably a buffer overflow. But i haven't found out yet where it is.

share|improve this question
1  
Is it possible something else messes up the bookkeeping for malloc ? –  cnicutar Feb 26 at 19:30
    
It sounds like memory gets corrupted somewhere else. –  imreal Feb 26 at 19:31
    
It's the only explanation, i'll post the whole code. (It's really a minimal model, with memory leaks, etc). –  guilhermemtr Feb 26 at 19:32
1  
"if needed i can put here the full source code" - yes, this is probably what you SHOULD do, because the piece of code above by itself cannot imply the source of the segfault. –  barak manos Feb 26 at 19:33
1  
Any chance of running the program under valgrind? If memory corruption is going on, valgrind might be able to show you where and when. –  Jeremy Friesner Feb 26 at 20:14
show 19 more comments

2 Answers 2

A SIGSEGV (segmentation fault) is firing in malloc is usually caused by heap corruption. Heap corruption does not cause a segmentation fault, so you would see that only when malloc tries to access there. The problem is that the code that creates the heap corruption could be in any point even far away from where the malloc is called. It is usually the next-block pointer inside the malloc that is changed by your heap corruption to an invalid address, so that when you call malloc an invalid pointer gets dereferenced and you get a segmentation fault.

I think you may try portions of your code isolated from the rest of the program to reduce the visibility of the bug.

Moreover I see that you never free the memory here and there can be a possible memory leak.

In order to check a memory leak you can run the top command top -b -n 1 and check:

RPRVT - resident private address space size
RSHRD - resident shared address space size
RSIZE - resident memory size
VPRVT - private address space size
VSIZE - total memory size
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that the segmentation fault only happens after a lot of calls. –  guilhermemtr Feb 26 at 20:52
    
did you see if there is a memory leakage? I didn't see any free here.... do you free memory sometime? –  Jekyll Feb 26 at 20:53
    
I will run into a problem if I don't free memory sooner or later... as this program only allocates here... –  Jekyll Feb 26 at 20:54
    
This is just a minimal model, in the original version it doesn't have memory leaks. in this one i just wanted to check the why of the error, by eliminating as much code as possible. So in this version i only want to find the malloc problem. –  guilhermemtr Feb 26 at 20:56
    
If you guess it's a malloc problem you should just allocate and free (to avoid going out of heap) memory tousands of time (malloc doesn't know your structure), so you don't need the full program, but this is very unlikely to happen @guilhermemtr –  Jekyll Feb 26 at 21:04
show 12 more comments
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've found out what the problem is. Usually, when computing recursive fibonacci for example, of a certain number n, then the stack size grows linearly with that number. However, in this case im creating tasks, and so what happens is that the stack size grows exponentially, as the fib grows. So what happens is that the stack size gets exponential size, as the number of calls to fibonacci do in a sequential program. However because im creating tasks for every task, the problem lies in that the stack grows as much as the number of calls grows. (exponencially)

It happened in the malloc, since it is the "deepest" call happened. So what happened was that the stack was almost exploding, and since malloc calls functions inside it, the stack grows more than just the calling of mywait and fib.

Thank you all! If it wasn't your help i wouldn't be able to figure it out!

PS: The stack overflow problem posted on stack overflow lol

share|improve this answer
    
should i mark my own answer as correct? –  guilhermemtr Feb 27 at 11:51
1  
That was what I was guessing as I couldn't find any problem. But to ensure this is the problem can you dump the 'top' output on a file and check how the memory usage increase? +1 for both answer and question. –  Jekyll Feb 27 at 12:03
    
when i removed all the threads, valgrind said this can be a stack overflow, althought it's unlikely. I've set the ulimit bigger and i could then run bigger fib nums. when i duplicate the stack size, i can only add 1 to the previous number. But i'll do as you said, just to confirm –  guilhermemtr Feb 27 at 12:11
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