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I'm having hard time trying to parse the following:

Current assigned information to variable is:

position: 170.198.19.170/net1
position: 170.198.19.165/rxy
position: take1234/net 
position: imwell/net3
position: xyz/444
position: 170.198.82.142/net
position: whoareu/net

I want to print all charcters between "Position:" and the Slash "/" minus the spaces and print them on a new line

So the end result should be :

170.198.19.170
170.198.19.16
take1234
imwell
xyz  
170.198.82.142

whoareu

Can someone help please. Try some TR and Sed replace but just not getting it.

Thanking u in advance

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8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try this:

echo "$variablename" | sed "s/position:/\npostion:/g" | cut -d"/" -f 1| cut -d " " -f 2 | sed '/^$/d'

This is updated answer where 'position:' occurs only once on ethe line, and I did it without using cut

echo "$variablename" | sed "s/position: //" | sed "s/\//\n/" | sed -n '2~2!p'

Let me know if this works for you.

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Thanks this is working .. Though I hate to use the cut command There must another way to do this –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:10
    
Given the input data, why are the seds necessary at all? This can be done purely with cut (see my answer) –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:28
    
@theuniverseisflat - what's wrong with cut? –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:28
    
when I posted this file with inputs did not have all 'position:' on the beginning of the line, it was edited after I posted this. About cutting cut out of this I will try... so hold on for now –  sgp667 Feb 26 at 23:48

Using awk:

awk -F '[:/ ]+' '$2=="position"{print $3}' file
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu

EDIT:

awk -F ':' '$1 ~ /position/{gsub(/ +|\/.*$/, ""); print $2}' file
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Hi Thanks but ur command does not work at all –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 19:55
1  
This one works fine for me too. If you're having problems, please be specific. We can't help you if you don't tell us what's wrong. –  ghoti Feb 26 at 19:56
    
This one doesn't work for me. Ubuntu 12.04, bash 4.2.25, GNU Awk 3.1.8. I don't know enough awk to quickly debug. –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:08
    
@DigitalTrauma: $2 should be $1, and $3 should be $2. –  mklement0 Feb 26 at 20:15
1  
@DigitalTrauma: I edited further, it should work. –  anubhava Feb 26 at 21:18

Try something like:

awk '{sub(/\/.*/,"",$2); print $2}' file

$ awk '{sub(/\/.*/,"",$2); print $2}' << EOF
position: 170.198.19.170/net1
position: 170.198.19.165/rxy
position: take1234/net 
position: imwell/net3
position: xyz/444
position: 170.198.82.142/net
position: whoareu/net
EOF
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu
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Assuming your data is in a variable called input:

Using cut:

$ cut -d' ' -f2 <<< "$input" | cut -d/ -f1
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu
$ 

An interesting pure-bash way using mapfile (requires >= 4.0) and parameter expansions on the resulting array elements. The end result is your required data in the elements of the array a:

$ mapfile -t a <<< "$input"
$ a=("${a[@]%%/*}")
$ a=("${a[@]##*: }")
$ echo ${a[@]}
170.198.19.170 170.198.19.165 take1234 imwell xyz 170.198.82.142 whoareu
$ 

Another pure-bash way, using the IFS variable to separate on both and /:

$ while IFS=" /" read _ x _; do echo "$x"; done <<< "$input"
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu
$ 

Probably the shortest with awk:

$ awk -F '[ /]' '{print $2}' <<< "$input"
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu
$ 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mapfile. :) –  ghoti Feb 26 at 19:57
    
no will not work –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:02
    
@theuniverseisflat - both methods work for me. What, if any errors do you see? What version of bash are you using? Is your input data in a file, or something else? –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:05
    
this is working for me : sed 's/position:[ ]*/\n/g' | sed -e 's/\/.*// –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:17
    
@theuniverseisflat - I see your input data is simply stored in a flat variable and not a file as I had assumed. So I have changed my answers to accept input from the variable via a bash here-string –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:24
sed 's/position:[ ]*/\n/g' t|sed 's_/[a-zA-Z0-9]*__g'|sed '/^\s*$/d'

Will do the trick.

How This works?

  1. Convert position: to newlines.
  2. Remove everything beyond / in a line.
  3. Delete empty lines.

And you get what you want.

To appreciate why this was done, note that OP had the following as the input initially :

position: 170.198.19.170/net1 position: 170.198.19.165/rxy position: take1234/net position: imwell/net3 position: xyz/444 position: 170.198.82.142/net position: whoareu/net position:

Making it much more harder than the relatively trivial input now.

aman@apollo:~/entire-src/py/imgdata$ cat t
position: 170.198.19.170/net1 position: 170.198.19.165/rxy position: take1234/net position: imwell/net3 position: xyz/444 position: 170.198.82.142/net position: whoareu/net position:
aman@apollo:~/entire-src/py/imgdata$ sed 's/position:[ ]*/\n/g' t|sed 's_/[a-zA-Z0-9]*__g'|sed '/^\s*$/d'
170.198.19.170 
170.198.19.165 
take1234 
imwell 
xyz 
170.198.82.142 
whoareu 
aman@apollo:~/entire-src/py/imgdata$ 

For the updated input, cut -f2 -d' ' t|sed 's_/[a-zA-Z0-9[:punct:]]*__g' will work. Here t is the name of the file which stores the pattern.

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1  
Why run sed three times? –  ghoti Feb 26 at 19:54
    
@ghoti I tried using the -e option but it wasn't working. Plus this looks neater imo. –  axiom Feb 26 at 19:59
    
Only the first part of your command is working and u had an extra t in that .. I just need to know now the command to find the forward slash "/" and delet anything after it I think –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:01
    
@theuniverseisflat t is the file in which your initial input was stored as can be seen from the dump I have pasted (cat t) –  axiom Feb 26 at 20:03
    
So not in the example I have provided .. I have another entry 170.198.26.69/nj-dts-40 << after executing ur command I get 170.198.26.69-dts-40 So it works for the sample data I provided but not when there i a dash –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:05

Using sed:

$ sed -ne '/^position: /{;s/^position: //;s:/.*::;p;}' <<< "$input"
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu
$ 

Or awk:

$ awk '/^position: /{sub(/^position: /, ""); sub(/\/.*/,""); print;}' <<< "$input"
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu
$

Or just using bash:

$ while read one two ; do [ "$one" = "position:" ] && echo "${two%%/*}" ; done <<< "$input"
170.198.19.170
170.198.19.165
take1234
imwell
xyz
170.198.82.142
whoareu
$

There are MANY ways to skin this cat.

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ho Thanks neither of the commands are workingDid not work –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 19:54
    
All three work for me. What did they do instead of working, when you tried them? –  ghoti Feb 26 at 19:55
    
The 3 commands returned nothing . zilch –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:08
    
@theuniverseisflat - all 3 work for me. Is your input data in a file called file, as required by these examples? –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:10
    
this worked for me thanks :: sed 's/position:[ ]*/\n/g' | sed -e 's/\/.*// –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:16

Thank you all >> In between you commands and other I came up with this

sed 's/position:[ ]*/\n/g' | sed -e 's/\/.*//

So thanks again !!!!

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Sorry the command did not come out right - This is the right command : sed 's/position:[ ]*/\n/g' | sed -e 's/\/.*// –  theuniverseisflat Feb 26 at 20:18
    
Just add four spaces to the start of code lines. –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:25
1  
Where is your input variable? –  DigitalTrauma Feb 26 at 20:25
    
This won't work, you aren't closing the quotes for the second sed script. Also, how does it handle input lines that don't start with the word position: ? –  ghoti Feb 26 at 20:28

Using parameter expansion without spawning an external process:

$ foo="position: 170.198.19.170/net1
> position: 170.198.19.165/rxy
> position: take1234/net
> position: imwell/net3
> position: xyz/444
> position: 170.198.82.142/net
> position: whoareu/net"

$ echo "${foo//position: /}"
170.198.19.170/net1
170.198.19.165/rxy
take1234/net
imwell/net3
xyz/444
170.198.82.142/net
whoareu/net
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