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Example:

mycssfile1.css:

.a { a:ssss; b:llll;}

mycssfile2.css:

.b { c:iiii;
   addclass .a
}

as same as .b {c:iiii;a:ssss;b:llll;}

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Tomasz Kowalczyk, Paulie_D, Christopher Marshall, cimmanon, Antony Feb 27 '14 at 14:44

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. –  Dryden Long Feb 26 '14 at 20:44
7  
You're looking for LESS or SASS. –  SLaks Feb 26 '14 at 20:44
1  
Sass is just Sass, not SASS :) –  Hashem Qolami Feb 26 '14 at 20:44
1  
@HashemQolami true that's how they spell it, but it's still an acronym (Syntactically Awesome Style Sheets) so really either way is correct :P –  Ennui Feb 26 '14 at 20:46
    
LESS or SASS could be a solution, but maybe you could use valid CSS to show what you're trying to achieve. –  Michal Feb 26 '14 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As many have said before, you will need to use a CSS preprocessor to do this. There are two fundamentally similar concepts that are different in their core usage, but they both can do what you would need. The two concepts are extend and import.

I am the most experienced with Sass, so I will explain how to do this in Sass, but it is similar in other preprocessors.

When you import css, you are creating a reusable piece of code called a mixin that can be included wherever it is needed. For example, writing

@mixin red-copy{ 
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    color:red;
}

h1{
    @include red-copy;
}
p{
    @include red-copy;
}

Would output CSS that looks like:

h1{
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    color:red;
}
p{
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    color:red;
}

You can also pass variables like this:

@mixin default-copy($color: red){
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    color: $color;
}

h1{
    @include default-copy(blue);
}
h2{ 
    @include default-copy(green);
}
p{
    @include default-copy;
}

Which would output to:

h1{
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    color: blue;
}
h2{
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    color: green;
}
p{
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    color: red;
}

Extends are slightly different, as you are extending an existing CSS declaration. They look something like this

.error{
    border: 1px solid red;
    color:red;
}
.serious-error{
    @extend .error;
    border-width:5px;
}

Which would compile to:

.error, .serious-error{
    border: 1px solid red;
    color:red;
}
.serious-error{
    border-width:5px;
}

Hope this helps!

Check out Sass here: http://sass-lang.com/

Check out LESS here: http://lesscss.org/

Check out Stylus here: http://learnboost.github.io/stylus/

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You can't do that with native CSS. What you're looking for is CSS precompiler, like SASS. Example, inspired from the doc:

.a { 
   prop1:val1;
   prop2:val2;
}


.b {
  @import "a";
  prop3:val3;
}
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Couldn't you just separate the classes with a comma?

.a, .b {
    font-size: 12px;
    margin: 10px;
}

.b {
    padding-top: 20px;
}
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