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I have a set of items that have information on them. These items are defined by me, the programmer, and the user do not ever need to change them, they will never need to change based on configuration, and the only time they might change is in a future version of my application. I know before hand how many of these items there should be, and what their exact data is.

An enum, is a great programming construct that let's me predefine a group of keys available in my application and group them under a logical Type.

What I need now, is a construct that let's me predefine a group of keys that have extra information attached to them.

Example:

This is a standard enum:

public enum PossibleKeys
{
    Key1,
    Key2,
    Key3
}

This is the enum I would need:

public enum PossibleItems
{
    Item1
    {
        Name = "My first item",
        Description = "The first of my possible items."
    },
    Item2
    {
        Name = "My second item",
        Description = "The second of my possible items."
    },
    Item3
    {
        Name = "My third item",
        Description = "The third of my possible items."
    }
}

I know this kind of enum does not exist. What I'm asking is: How can I, in C#, hard code a set of predefined items whose data is set in code? What would be the best way to do this?

EDIT: I don't necessarily want a solution that uses enums, just a solution that allows me to have this behaviour, which is to know all possible items in my application, and the info that each of them has.

EDIT 2: It's important for me to be able to get all existing items at runtime. So being able to query all items and to iterate over them is required. Just like I could with an enum.

share|improve this question
    
if you want that don't use enum.Use Class for your Items with static readonly values for example –  Selman22 Feb 26 '14 at 22:21
    
@Selman22 I need to be able to get all items that exist in my app at runtime. I'm not sure if reflection could let me find all Classes under a certain namespace in a given assembly. Then maybe it could work. I'm still open to see other solutions to this. –  didibus Feb 26 '14 at 22:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If it's purely for description you can use the built-in DescriptionAttribute as stated in some of the other answers. If you need functionality that an attribute can't supply, however, you can create a lookup with some sort of metadata object.

Something like this:

public enum PossibleKeys
{
    Key1,
    Key2,
    Key3
}

public class KeyMetadata
{
    public PossibleKeys Id { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherClass SomethingAttributesCantHandle { get; set; }
}

private static readonly IReadOnlyDictionary<PossibleKeys, KeyMetadata> KeyMetadataLookup;

static EnumContainerClass()
{
    Dictionary<PossibleKeys, KeyMetadata> metadata = new Dictionary<PossibleKeys, KeyMetadata>();
    metadata.Add(PossibleKeys.Key1, new KeyMetadata { Id = PossibleKeys.Key1, Description = "First Item" });
    metadata.Add(PossibleKeys.Key2, new KeyMetadata { Id = PossibleKeys.Key2, Description = "Second Item" });
    metadata.Add(PossibleKeys.Key3, new KeyMetadata { Id = PossibleKeys.Key3, Description = "Third Item" });
    KeyMetadataLookup = new ReadOnlyDictionary<PossibleKeys, KeyMetadata>(metadata);
}

Then to retrieve:

KeyMetadataLookup[PossibleKeys.Key1].Description

Note that I'd only use this if there was something attributes couldn't handle. If it's all primitive types you can also simply make your own custom attribute. You're not limited to simply the built-in ones.

Your own custom attribute would end up like:

[System.AttributeUsage(System.AttributeTargets.Enum)]
public class CustomDataAttribute : System.Attribute
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public string Description { get; set; }
}

Then in use:

public enum PossibleItems
{
    [CustomData(Name = "My first item", Description = "The first of my possible items.")]
    Item1,

    [CustomData(Name = "My second item", Description = "The second of my possible items.")]
    Item2,

    [CustomData(Name = "My third item", Description = "The third  of my possible items.")]
    Item3
}
share|improve this answer
    
A lot of good answers were given to me here. I like how you pointed out that for primitive types, a custom attribute can be used. You answered my problem of having to store multiple extra primitive info on the enum in a simple and clean way. You also solved my problem of needing to query and iterate over my items at runtime using the approach of a dictionary mapping from the enum to a metadata object. I found your solution covered most use cases the best, so that's why I chose this one over the others. –  didibus Mar 3 '14 at 19:39
    
For the dictionary implementation, adding an extension method to the enum as pointed out by Jack0x539 answers makes this an all around pretty perfect solution. –  didibus Mar 3 '14 at 19:41

try this

public enum PossibleKeys{
    [Description("key 1 desc")]
    Key1,
    [Description("key 2 desc")]
    Key2,
    [Description("key 3 desc")]
    Key3
}
share|improve this answer

When I need an associated description with the enum values, I do this by putting a DescriptionAttribute on each enum value and then use an extension method to gain access to that data. Here is a complete LINQPad example of this.

// Make sure to add a using for System.ComponentModel

void Main()
{
    Test.First.GetDescription().Dump();
    Test.Second.GetDescription().Dump();
}

public enum Test
{
    [Description("My first enum value's description.")]
    First = 1,
    [Description("My second enum value's description.")]
    Second = 2
}

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    public static string GetDescription(this Enum value)
    {
        DescriptionAttribute[] descriptionAttributes = (DescriptionAttribute[])value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString()).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);
        return (descriptionAttributes != null && descriptionAttributes.Length > 0 ? descriptionAttributes[0].Description : null);
    }
}

This outputs

My first enum value's description.

My second enum value's description.

share|improve this answer
public class PossibleItems
{
    public class Item1
    {
        public static readonly string Name = "My first item";
        public static readonly string  Description = "The first of my possible items.";
    }

    public class Item2
    {
        public static readonly string  Name = "My second item";
        public static readonly string  Description = "The second of my possible items.";
    }

    public class Item3
    {
        public static readonly string  Name = "My third item";
        public static readonly string  Description = "The third of my possible items.";
    }
}

Access using PossibleItems.Item1.Name;

share|improve this answer
    
This is simple and clean, but I prefer having custom attributes on an enum to this. I also rather an approach that use non static objects to this one, since it allows me to iterate over my items at runtime without having to do reflection. –  didibus Mar 3 '14 at 19:43

Another alternative can be using Java style enums

public class PossibleItems
{
    public string Name { private set; get; }
    public string Description { private set; get; }

    public static PossibleItems Item1 = new PossibleItems() { Name = "My first item", Description = "The first of my possible items" };
    public static PossibleItems Item2 = new PossibleItems() { Name = "My second  item", Description = "The second  of my possible items" };

    private PossibleItems()
    {

    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return (Name + ";" + Description).GetHashCode();
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if(!(obj is PossibleItems)) return false;
        var other = obj as PossibleItems;
        return other.Name == Name && other.Description == Description;
    }
}

bool eq  = PossibleItems.Item1 == PossibleItems.Item1;
Console.WriteLine(PossibleItems.Item1.Name);
share|improve this answer
    
Have to give you credit for mentioning the override of GetHashCode and Equals so that the items can be used as keys and also compared, just as an enum would be. –  didibus Mar 3 '14 at 19:45

I agree with that your should probably be using some sort of class. But you could also add an extension method if you really want to use Enums.

public static PossibleItem GetPossibleItem(this PossibleKey key){
    switch (key){
       case Key1:
       return WhateverItem;
       ...
}

then you can Just call Key1.GetPossibleItem();

share|improve this answer

C# isn't great at this - enums tend to be just that, not so much additional stuff. You can get close with the following, but I'd sooner recommend a class with a private constructor and readonly instances of itself.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        State fullState = State.Full;

        Console.WriteLine(fullState.Description());
        Console.WriteLine(State.HalfFull.Description());

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public enum State
{
    Empty,
    Full,
    HalfFull
}

public static class StateExtensions
{
    private static Dictionary<State, string> descriptions = new Dictionary<State, string>();

    static StateExtensions()
    {
        descriptions.Add(State.Empty, "It's just empty");
        descriptions.Add(State.Full, "It's so full");
        descriptions.Add(State.HalfFull, "It's got something in it");
    }

    public static string Description(this State state)
    {
        return descriptions[state];
    }
}

Or a non-enum based approched might be something akin to

class MusicalNote
{
    public int Index { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; private set; }

    private MusicalNote(int index, string name)
    {
        Index = index;
        Name = name;
    }

    public static readonly MusicalNote A = new MusicalNote(1, "A");
    public static readonly MusicalNote ASharp = new MusicalNote(2, "A#");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like your extension method, makes using this solution a lot cleaner. –  didibus Mar 3 '14 at 19:47
 static class PossibleItems
    {
        public class Item
        {
            public readonly string Name;
            public readonly string Description;

            public Item(string name, string desc)
            {
                this.Name = name;
                this.Description = desc;
            }
        }

        public static List<Item> Get()
        {
            List<Item> list = new List<Item>();
            list.Add(new Item("name1", "desc1"));
            list.Add(new Item("name2", "desc2"));
            return list;
        }
    }

Then for accessing in an iterative fashion you can do

foreach ( PossibleItem.Item item in PossibleItems.Get())
{
    MessageBox.Show(item.Name + ": " + item.Description);
}

If you want an item with a particular name you could even add this code to your PossibleItems class

        public static Item GetItemWithName(PossibleNames name)
        {
            switch (name)
            {
                case PossibleNames.Name1:
                    return new Item("Name1", "Desc1");

                case PossibleNames.Name2:
                    return new Item("Name2", "Desc2");
            }
            return null;
        }

        public enum PossibleNames
        {
            Name1,
            Name2
        }

P.S. I get extra points for typing this out on a smartphone

share|improve this answer
    
I think you get extra points for showing an example of how you'd be able to iterate over the items. –  didibus Mar 3 '14 at 19:46

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