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Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <iomanip>

std::vector<unsigned char> bytes;
{
    std::ifstream in(name, std::ios_base::binary);
    bytes.assign(std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in >> std::noskipws),
                 std::istreambuf_iterator<char>());
}

According to the reference, the vector.assign function takes two arguments, first and last, and takes anything in between into the vector. And the istreambuf_iterator function takes this form:

istreambuf_iterator( std::basic_istream<CharT,Traits>& is );    
istreambuf_iterator( std::basic_streambuf<CharT,Traits>* s );

These are all easy to understand, but in the snippet above, the second iterator initializer takes no arguments, what does it mean?

Also notice that the type of bytes is unsigned char, while the type of the iterator is char, isn't this a mismatch?

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2  
The default constructor makes an end of stream iterator. See here. –  juanchopanza Feb 26 '14 at 22:26
1  
And there's an implicit conversion from char to unsigned char. –  0x499602D2 Feb 26 '14 at 22:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

the second iterator initializer takes no arguments, what does it mean?

It means it's initialized to be the end-of-stream iterator.

Also notice that the type of bytes is unsigned int, while the type of the iterator is char, isn't this a mismatch?

You mean unsigned char right? (That's what it says in your code.)

It's fine because unsigned char can be constructed from and assigned from char. Templated functions taking iterator ranges generally do not require that the types match exactly. (For the precise requirements, see Table 100 in §23.2.3 of the standard.)

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In this case, if I just want to read two bytes, what argument should I give to istreambuf_iterator? –  qed Feb 26 '14 at 23:30
    
@qed I don't believe there's a nice way to do that. Just write a loop. –  Brian Feb 26 '14 at 23:33

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