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I've got a file that looks like:

20 30 40
80 70 60
50 30 40

Each column represents a procedure. I want to know how the procedures did for each row. My ideal output would be

3 2 1
1 2 3
1 3 2

i.e. in row 1, the third column had the highest value, followed by the second, then the first smallest (this can be reversed, doesn't matter).

How would I do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd do it with some other Unix tools (read, cat, sort, cut, tr, sed, and bash of course):

while read line
do
  cat -n <(echo "$line" | sed 's/ /\n/g') | sort -r -k +2 | cut -f1 | tr '\n' ' '
  echo
done < input.txt

The output looks like this:

 3      2      1 
 1      2      3 
 1      3      2 
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a part of this that only requires a three-column file? Because my actual file is considerably more than three columns. –  Andrew Latham Feb 26 at 23:00
    
No, that solution is general and would work with any number of columns. –  Alfe Feb 26 at 23:01
1  
Oh no, I am sorry. This is right. I was thinking about each column being the rank of that column's value for that row but of course that is not what I asked in my question, apologies. –  Andrew Latham Feb 26 at 23:27
1  
No need to change it, it's perfect as is, thank you very much! –  Andrew Latham Feb 26 at 23:28
1  
For the other version you could use while read line; do for i in $line; do cat -n <(echo "$line" | sed 's/ /\n/g' | sort -r -k +2) | grep "$i$" | { read a b; echo "$a"; }; done | tr '\n' ' '; echo; done –  Alfe Feb 26 at 23:37

Another solution using Python:

$ python
Python 2.7.6 (default, Jan 26 2014, 17:25:18)
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple LLVM 5.0 (clang-500.2.79)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>
>>> with open('file.txt') as f:
...    lis=[x.split() for x in f]
...
>>> for each in lis:
...     each = [i[0] + 1 for i in sorted(enumerate(each), key=lambda x:x[1], reverse=True)]
...     print ' '.join([str(item) for item in each])
...
3 2 1
1 2 3
1 3 2
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Using Gnu Awk version 4:

$ awk 'BEGIN{ PROCINFO["sorted_in"]="@val_num_desc" }
{
    split($0,a," ")
    for (i in a) printf "%s%s", i,OFS
    print ""
}' file

3 2 1 
1 2 3 
1 3 2 
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If you have GNU awk then you can do something like:

awk '{
    y = a = x = j = i = 0;
    delete tmp;
    delete num;
    delete ind;
    for(i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {
        num[$i, i] = i
    }
    x = asorti(num)
    for(y = 1; y <= x; y++) {
        split(num[y], tmp, SUBSEP)
        ind[++j] = tmp[2]
}
for(a = x; a >= 1; a--) {
    printf "%s%s", ind[a],(a==1?"\n":" ")
}
}' file

$ cat file
20 30 40
0.923913 0.913043 0.880435 0.858696 0.826087 0.902174 0.836957 0.880435
80 70 60
50 30 40

awk '{
    y = a = x = j = i = 0;
    delete tmp;
    delete num;
    delete ind;
    for(i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {
        num[$i, i] = i
    }
    x = asorti(num)
    for(y = 1; y <= x; y++) {
        split(num[y], tmp, SUBSEP)
        ind[++j] = tmp[2]
}
for(a = x; a >= 1; a--) {
    printf "%s%s", ind[a],(a==1?"\n":" ")
}
}' file
3 2 1
1 2 6 8 3 4 7 5
1 2 3
1 3 2
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and for the first row, which was 0.923913 0.913043 0.880435 0.858696 0.826087 0.902174 0.836957 0.880435, got 1 2 6 8 4 7 5. Alfe's script also tried to do 12683475 which is the wrong order, this script gives the same order but the 3 has disappeared. –  Andrew Latham Feb 26 at 23:12
    
Aah, there are duplicate numbers across the line. 0.880435 appeared twice and hence the key was overwritten. Let me try to fix it. –  jaypal Feb 26 at 23:18
    
@AndrewLatham Updated the solution. –  jaypal Feb 27 at 0:47

Solution via perl

#!/usr/bin/perl
open(FH,'<','/home/chidori/input.txt') or die "Can't open file$!\n";
while(my $line=<FH>){
        chomp($line);
        my @unsorted_array=split(/\s/,$line);
        my $count=scalar @unsorted_array;
        my @sorted_array = sort { $a <=> $b } @unsorted_array;
        my %hash=map{$_ => $count--} @sorted_array;

        foreach my $value(@unsorted_array){
                print "$hash{$value} ";
        }

        print "\n";
}
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