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So I am trying to find an answer to question 3 on project Euler. I need to determine the largest prime factor of a given number.

Quote Project Euler : "The prime factors of 13195 are 5, 7, 13 and 29. What is the largest prime factor of the number 600851475143 ?"

I have built my code and it works perfectly on anything the size of an int. But due to the gigantic number they give, my code has conversionproblems.

Originally I tried switching to long variables and long arrays but I get the error : 'possible lossy conversion from long to int'

So how I can I make my code accept extremely long numbers?

public class Test {

long[] delers;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test test = new Test();
    test.determineDividers(600851475143,determineNumberOfDividers(600851475143));
    long a = test.determineHighestPrime(test.delers);
    System.out.println(a);
}

public void determineDividers(long getal,long aantalDelers) {
    delers= new long[aantalDelers];
    long k = 0;
    for (long i = 1; i < getal; i++) {
        if (getal % i == 0) {
            delers[k]=i;
            k++;                
        }
    }
}

public long determineNumberOfDividers(long getal) {
    int k = 0;
    for (long i = 1; i < getal; i++) {
        if (getal % i == 0) {
            k++;               
        }
    }
    return k;
}

public boolean determinePrime(long getal) {
    for (long i = 2; i < getal; i++) {
        if (getal % i == 0) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

public long determineHighestPrime(long[] deler) {
    for (long i = deler.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
        if (determinePrime(deler[i]) == true) {
            return deler[i]);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

}

Thank you for your time

EDIT 1 : Added example from PE.

EDIT 2 : Added solution

public class Test {

long[] delers;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test test = new Test();
    test.determineDividers(600851475143L,test.determineNumberOfDividers(600851475143L));
    long a = test.determineHighestPrime(test.delers);
    System.out.println(a);
}

public void determineDividers(long getal,int aantalDelers) {
    delers= new long[aantalDelers];
    int k = 0;
    for (long i = 1; i < getal; i++) {
        if (getal % i == 0) {
            System.out.println(i);
            delers[k]=i;
            k++;                
        }
    }
}

public int determineNumberOfDividers(long getal) {
    int k = 0;
    for (long i = 1; i < getal; i++) {
        if (getal % i == 0) {
            k++;               
        }
    }
    return k;
}

public boolean determinePrime(long getal) {
    for (long i = 2; i < getal; i++) {
        if (getal % i == 0) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

public long determineHighestPrime(long[] deler) {
    for (int i = deler.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
        if (determinePrime(deler[i]) == true) {
            return deler[i];
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

}

share|improve this question
7  
Put an L after those huge constants, i.e. 600851475143L, to tell Java that they have to be long. –  ajb Feb 26 '14 at 23:45
1  
You might consider moving to a BigDecimal or BigInteger class as well. They are tailored to handle numbers of any size. –  ug_ Feb 26 '14 at 23:47
1  
You have to add the L to both constants. –  ajb Feb 27 '14 at 0:37
1  
"to determine the largest prime factor of a given number" you don't have to store all its prime factors let alone all its divisors so don't have to know how many there are of them. -- just use long. -- if n=a*b and a is prime, then prime factorization of n is a plus the prime factorization of b = n / a, right? ... if n=2*b and b is not divisible by 2,3,4,5,6, but 7 divides it, then b=7*c and c can not be divisible by 2,3,4,5,6 - because else b would be. Correct? –  Will Ness Feb 27 '14 at 17:16
1  
@ajb right. and again, if n=a*b where a<=b then a*a <= a*b = n, so when we test c by i=7,8,9,..., when we get to i such that i*i > n, do we really need to test c by (i+1) or do we already know at this point that c is prime? –  Will Ness Feb 27 '14 at 22:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you set up an array, the size of the array has to be an int. Therefore, this:

delers= new long[aantalDelers];

won't compile, because you declared the parameter aantalDelers as long. However, when you call determineDividers, the value you pass in for aantalDelers is the result of determineNumberOfDividers, which you declared as returning long, but that function says return k, and k is an int.

So I think you can change determineNumberOfDividers so that it returns int instead of long, and change the aantalDelers parameter to be int instead of long. That way you'll avoid any long-to-int conversions. Also, in places where you use k and i as array indexes, and you declared them as long, those should be changed to int also.

Off the top of my head, I think this will work because I don't think a number up to 263 can have more than 231 divisors. But if my math is wrong and it can, then you'll need some other mechanism besides an array. (In fact, you may need to come up with another algorithm anyway; I have a feeling that this one is going to take a very long time to run.)

share|improve this answer
    
Reupdated OP. I still get an error at 'test.determineDividers(600851475143L,test.determineNumberOfDividers(60085147514‌​3));' stating : integer number too large 600851475143 –  BURNS Feb 27 '14 at 0:08

Change all the variables that will get "gigantic" to BigInteger. You'll need to update your Math to use function calls instead of java operands, but they are all available in BigInteger.

share|improve this answer
4  
This isn't necessary. 600851475143 is far away from a long's max value of 18446744073709551616. –  BitNinja Feb 26 '14 at 23:50
    
Yes. The final question is "So how I can I make my code accept extremely long numbers?". I figured I'd answer that directly. –  Ted Bigham Feb 27 '14 at 0:09
    
I believe that the point is that his code doesn't have to. –  BitNinja Feb 27 '14 at 0:19

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