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For example, the input:

line1 col1-1 http://www.google.com/index.html col3-1 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line2 col1-2 https://user:pwd@www.facebook.com/pp/index.html col3-2 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line3 col1-3 badColumn col3-3 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8

Should results in

line1 col1-1 http://www.google.com col3-1 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line2 col1-2 https://www.facebook.com col3-2 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line3 col1-3 badColumn col3-3 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8

It is possible to achieve it with awk one linear (sub and regex?) Otherwise, how would you implement it in bash?

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6 Answers 6

I think it would probably be better to use a URL parser. For example, Python has: urlparse which can be used to parse URLs into components. Here's some example code, run like:

python3 script.py file

Contents of script.py:

import sys
import csv
from urllib.parse import urlparse


with open(sys.argv[1], 'r') as csvfile:

    r = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter=' ')

    for row in r:

        url = urlparse(row[2]);

        if (url.scheme and url.hostname):

            row[2] = url.scheme + "://" + url.hostname

        print(' '.join(row))

Results:

line1 col1-1 http://www.google.com col3-1 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line2 col1-2 https://www.facebook.com col3-2 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line3 col1-3 badColumn col3-3 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
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With GNU awk you can do:

gawk '$3~/http/{$3=gensub(/([^/]+)\/\/([^/]+).*/,"\\1//\\2","g",$3);gsub(/\/\/.*www/,"//www",$3)}1' file

$ cat file
line1 col1-1 http://www.google.com/index.html col3-1 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line2 col1-2 https://user:pwd@www.facebook.com/pp/index.html col3-2 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line3 col1-3 badColumn col3-3 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8

$ awk '$3~/http/{$3=gensub(/([^/]+)\/\/([^/]+).*/,"\\1//\\2","g",$3);gsub(/\/\/.*www/,"//www",$3)}1' file
line1 col1-1 http://www.google.com col3-1 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line2 col1-2 https://user:pwd@www.facebook.com col3-2 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line3 col1-3 badColumn col3-3 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
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1  
+1 but I think OP wants to delete user:pwd@ also. –  anubhava Feb 27 '14 at 0:23
    
@anubhava Oops, good catch. Though I think the answer has become more fragile to handle different use cases. :(. Thanks for the feedback though. –  jaypal singh Feb 27 '14 at 0:27

Here is another awk

awk '/http/ {split($3,a,"/");sub(/^.*@/,"",a[3]);$3=a[1]"//"a[3]}8' file
line1 col1-1 http://www.google.com col3-1 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line2 col1-2 https://www.facebook.com col3-2 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
line3 col1-3 badColumn col3-3 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
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Not the most beautiful regexp, but in sed :

$ sed -r 's|://([^/]*@)?([^/]*)[^ \t]*|://\2|g' < myfile
line1 col1-1 http://www.google.com/ col8
line2 col1-2 https://user:pwd@www.facebook.com/ col8
line3 col1-3 badColumn col3-3 col4 col5 col6 col7 col8
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replace "//user:password@" with "//"

sed 's:/.*@://:g' inputfile
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What if col7 is an email address? –  ghoti Feb 27 '14 at 12:06
    
then it will, ofcourse, not work :-) –  thom Feb 27 '14 at 23:56

My quick & dirty sed solution would be this:

sed 's#//[^@]*@#//#;s#\([^/]\)/[^/][^ ]* #\1 #' file1

which like the others here doesn't restrict its activity to just the third column. This relies on the idea that the first non-doubled slash in the URL is where you want to start stripping, and that those magic double slashes don't appear anywhere else on the line.

To restrict things to just the third column, awk seems like a good bet. But you can't do backreferences using sub() or gsub() functions in most awk implementations, but you can use them in GAWK's gensub(), like this:

gawk '{$3=gensub(/\/\/([^@\/]+@)?([^\/]+).*/, "//\\2", "g", $3)} 1' file1

This is similar to but simpler than jaypal's solution as it uses only a single substitution, and it doesn't require that "www" be part of the hostname.

But you can also do this in pure bash:

while read one two three four; do
  method=${three%//*}
  host=${three#*//}
  host=${host#*@}
  host=${host%/*}
  three="$method//$host"
  echo "$one $two $three $four"
done < file1

Yep. You can do anything in bash. It just takes more typing. :)

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