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from django.template import Template, Context
    class Person(object):
        def __init__(self, first_name, last_name):
            self.first_name, self.last_name = first_name, last_name
t = Template('Hello, {{ person.first_name }} {{ person.last_name }}.')
c = Context({'person': Person('John', 'Smith')})
t.render(c)
>>> u'Hello, John Smith.

Okay, so whats confusing me is this: {{ person.last_name }} . Specifically, what attribute it is extracting from the class.

Since we have 3 attributes in the Person class:

self.first_name, self.last_name = first_name, last_name

Why isn't {{ person.last_name }} calling from 'self.last_name = first_name' and getting an output of John. Why is {{ person.last_name }} instead getting "last_name"?

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btw indentation is wrong –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 27 '14 at 10:02

3 Answers 3

So the gist of your questions seem to be this line:

self.first_name, self.last_name = first_name, last_name

This line simply assigns self.first_name from first_name and self.last_name from last_name. It is the same as this:

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, first_name, last_name):
        self.first_name = first_name
        self.last_name = last_name

So in Python this:

a, b = 1, 2

just means that a gets the value 1 and b get the value 2. If you wanted a and b to have the same value you would do:

a = b = 1
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...and do it this way. The tuple assignment just looks like someone trying to be clever. It's certainly not more readable or easily maintainable. –  John La Rooy Feb 27 '14 at 10:06
    
Wow, I had not noticed this is what it was doing. I assumed that in python syntax a ',' meant that the line would simply mean it was being continued so I had assumed that 'self.last_name = first_name' was actually an assignment of sorts. Also, wouldn't the tuple assignment need to use parenthesis, like this: (self.first_name, self.last_name )= (first_name, last_name) ? Or at least parenthesis on one side ? –  ApathyBear Feb 27 '14 at 10:26
    
1, 2 is just syntactic sugar for (1, 2). So no, you don't need any parenthesis. Try writing 1, 2 in your interpreter. –  Reite Feb 27 '14 at 10:30

Its because of your assignment in init method.

self.first_name, self.last_name = first_name, last_name

Which is equal to

self.first_name = first_name
self.last_name = last_name

So whats the confusion here...?

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__init__ has 3 variable self, first_name and last_name.

self is like this in other language. first_name and last_name are local variable passed to __init__, due to that first_name and last_name has no reference outside __init__.

We are storing first_name and last_name in the object variable as self.first_name and self.last_name. self.first_name and self.last_name has scope of Object life.

Assign of values are

self.first_name, self.last_name = first_name, last_name

is like

(self.first_name, self.last_name) = (first_name, last_name)

Assign 2 value of left side with 2 values of right side.

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