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I've been searching around for a Continuous Integration solution for Ruby on Rails, but haven't been too pleased with the results. I came from a .NET shop that used CruiseControl.NET and was really spoiled with its ease of use and rich status/reporting.

Ideally I'm looking for:

  • The obvious Git/SVN and Test::Unit integration

  • Integration with Rake and/or Capistrano

  • A web interface showing the status of the build

  • Email notification of failed builds.

  • Desktop notification (potentially through Growl)

  • REST API for build statuses

  • Plugin framework for running other code analysis tools and reporting results in the UI

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10  
So what is your choice now, three years later? –  Andrei Aug 5 '11 at 21:18
3  
Can I suggest circleci.com? –  Paul Biggar May 24 '12 at 20:55
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23 Answers 23

up vote 66 down vote accepted

I just went through the options here and thought I'd roll them up as of late 2011.

Integrity

After a near-death experience that left the still-linked-to website with outdated information and downed the demo site, this project has a spark of life again. But the documentation hasn't moved on, and lots and lots of the steps in the tutorial are just plain broken; I had to change references to gems, build some things out of band, and then I still couldn't get it working.

Cruise Control.rb

Dead simple: you just download it, run a command line to add your project (there is no UI for doing so), and run the Rails app. But there's no UI for editing your project, either, and there's no real integration with build artifacts aside from displaying links to them: you get no graphs of tests run, no trend lines, etc. I also had to adjust the routes.rb file to get the code linking working (the resources :projects line needs to move below all the other non-default routes).

TeamCity

This looks awesome, but the pay scale seems out of whack. 3 agents free and then when you're dependent you need to dole out hundreds of dollars. Personal Builds looks great, but don't have the budget.

Jenkins (née Hudson)

This is a Java stalwart and it is loaded up with a thousand options, so the UI is confusing and it's a chore to set up your projects. But once you set it up you get a whole lot of plugins that can pull from most anywhere, run most anything, and report most everything. The OS X Installer points Jenkins at /Users/Shared/Jenkins/Home but fails to create that directory or chown it to daemon (which is uses by default, and you should change to a new jenkins user so you can set up GitHub integration).

Others

I didn't really try these, but thought I'd mention why:

  • CI Joe wants to own the GitHub repo more than I want it, and its creators aren't even using it; they're on Jenkins.
  • Cerberus seems neatly small but doesn't have a UI and doesn't automatically publish build artifacts where others can see them.
  • BigTuna seems to be a CruiseControl.rb clone without the (already minimal) community support.
  • Bamboo looks really neat if you use JIRA and BitBucket, but we use neither. It does deploys but we already have those set up in Capistrano.

The Choice

We went with Jenkins, but I really wish one of the lighter-weight solutions had worked out.

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6  
What about travis? –  Vanuan Mar 19 '12 at 19:37
3  
I work on a closed-source project, so unless I misunderstand their (poorly-worded) documentation, Travis isn't really an option for us (ain't no way I'm granting them write access to our GitHub project). If I were writing some gems I'd jump on Travis in an instant, but not for actual Rails sites. –  TALlama Mar 19 '12 at 22:48
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Just for the record, Travis CI is soon to release a PRO (Paid and Private) version that is already in Beta. It's a little on the pricey side for small projects at $129 and $249 per month but it's worth having a look: travis-ci.com –  Josh Pinter Jun 10 '13 at 17:39
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How about CruiseControl.rb?

Same crowd that did CruiseControl (thoughtworks) and written in Ruby. Very easy to use Rake to integrate your other tools, and can use the ruby-growl gem for your notifications.

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I've had trouble getting this to run on windows... didn't work as advertised in the 'it can't be that easy' video on the site for me. –  Gishu Oct 21 '08 at 4:35
    
I wouldn't be swayed by the thoughtworks branding - judge it on it's merits. –  daf Jun 24 '10 at 21:35
    
this project has only recently maintained and has not released a new version since 2009...but it works.. –  Scott Schulthess Aug 9 '11 at 21:55
3  
cruisecontrol is very primitive and very very outdated. –  bragboy Aug 16 '11 at 15:18
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Given the various security-related events up to early February (2013), leaving CruiseControl.rb in its default configuration (Gem versions, etc.) is unconscionable. I've been able to get it running under Rails 3.0.20, but 3.2.11+ is apparently going to take significantly more work. At this point, I am very open to alternatives, with a requirements list very similar to Jim Fiorato's. –  Jeff Dickey Feb 3 '13 at 16:42
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You might also want to consider Hudson. It is designed for use with Java projects although there is a great selection of plug-ins available including support for Ruby and Rake. It has a very useful web interface and supports email notifications as well as many others (like twitter, or giant bear lamps).

The community is also very active and there have been several articles on hooking up Hudson with Selenium which you might be helpful for testing Rails applications on the browser side.

Another one look at is Team City which is free for small projects and teams (including commercial). I really like Team City and have used it before for other projects but currently we're using Mercurial for source control and Team City's support was a little too beta when we were considering it.

I switched from CruiseControl.net to Team City and was absolutely shocked at the improvement. I'm partial to Hudson though because of its similar feature set and very active community.

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2  
+1 for TC. Hands down the best CI I have ever seen –  Matt Briggs Mar 11 '10 at 3:27
    
TeamCity is the shit +1 –  Chris McCall Apr 13 '10 at 20:24
3  
Hudson is excellent. –  Aaron Scruggs Dec 2 '10 at 3:31
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Be warned that there is some political stuff going down for Hudson due to, uh, we'll call it creative differences, with Oracle. The bulk of the developers appear to be moving with the fork which will be called Jenkins; Oracle has staff and will continue to support and develop Hudson. –  dondo Jan 31 '11 at 23:58
4  
Good point dondo. For those interested in tracking Hudson's continued development, you can check out Jenkins at jenkins-ci.org –  Julian Feb 14 '11 at 7:32
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Circle is an advanced CI service for Rails (and other web apps). From your list, it supports the following:

  • Git and Test::Unit integration (also RSpec, Cucumber, Jasmine, Konacha integrations, and supports arbitrary extra test commands)
  • Integration with Rake and/or Capistrano (uses Rake to run commands and set up DBs, support continuous deployment using Capistrano or Heroku, or anything really)
  • A web interface showing the status of the build
  • Email notification of failed builds.
  • Desktop notification (through CCMenu/CCTray)
  • REST API for build statuses
  • Plugin framework for running other code analysis tools and reporting results in the UI (we can run arbitrary commands and support including their status as part of the build)

Joel and I spent a while chatting about this on the Stackoverflow podcast - check it out!


(edit) Disclaimer: Paul Biggar founded Circle as he states in his Stackoverflow profile

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Check out Tddium. Tddium support continuous integration, deployment and interactive testing of Ruby applications. It provides a managed environment with support for Selenium, Headless Webkit, and Solr. It hosts live Postgres, MySQL, Mongo, and Redis instances. And it automatically parallelizes large test suites.

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4  
Jay, you may want to expose your association with tddium and solano labs. Per the FAQ: "you must disclose your affiliation in your answers" –  tmg May 29 '13 at 19:39
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Semaphore is a new hosted CI app for Ruby and Rails apps. It integrates with GitHub, requires no setup and has a simple UI.

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We are using Semaphore as a part of CI suite and it works fantastic. You can see how it's integrated with other software like Jasmine and HipChat in one of our blog posts. The op also mentioned using Capistrano as a deployment tool. We used it in the past, but it was too slow for us so we switched to Mina. –  denis.arunovic Feb 17 at 19:42
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cruisecontrol.rb would be the perfect match then.

http://cruisecontrolrb.thoughtworks.com/

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Like a number of people I was a huge fan of cruisecontrol.rb, but have recently switched my projects to Integrity.

Lightweight and easy to setup (much like cc.rb), but with a nicer interface.

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5  
I just tried to set up Integrity and it's a mess. –  lawrence Oct 12 '10 at 19:49
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Travis CI has become popular in the ruby world: http://travis-ci.org/

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Travis CI is good for open source projects but not really for closed source ones. Jenkins can cover both case :-) –  Gabor Garami May 5 '12 at 21:47
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But isn't is open sourced? github.com/travis-ci/travis-ci Can't you just setup your private travis instance as you do with jenkins? –  Vanuan May 6 '12 at 14:21
    
You probably could, but in the Readme, they recommend against it and mention that it's not yet a good fit for private hosting. –  Andrew Aug 1 '12 at 4:39
    
It's fine now for closed projects –  aehlke Jul 2 at 17:30
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BigTuna - written in Ruby, uses Rails and using itself as its CI.

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2  
Be advised that the appelier.com link for BigTuna is a dead link to an expired domain. The project can now be found on Github. –  Jeff Dickey Feb 3 '13 at 16:49
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You can give Codeship a spin and see if it works for you (I am one of the founders)

Cloud based Continuous Integration and Deployment(with special Heroku support)

The first four of your items are already implemented and work fine for a number of companies

  • The obvious Git/SVN and Test::Unit integration
  • Integration with Rake and/or Capistrano
  • A web interface showing the status of the build
  • Email notification of failed builds.

We are working on those features as well:

  • Desktop notification (potentially through Growl)
  • REST API for build statuses
  • Plugin framework for running other code analysis tools and reporting results in the UI
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Drone.io

I just setup our main Ruby on Rails application with http://drone.io/. Was a piece of cake and it's got a great interface. I'd say worth checking out if you're looking for a simple, hosted solution.

JP

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Integrity seems to be a great solution. Deploying onto heroku is a breeze: http://elabs.se/blog/7-continuous-integration-testing-for-ruby-on-rails-with-integrity http://integrityapp.com

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Noone here mentioned Atlassian's Bamboo. There is a nice tutorial-like article about Ruby on Rails CI using Bamboo:

http://blogs.atlassian.com/news/2009/05/bamboo_customer_8.html

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Sadly, that is now a dead link. –  TALlama Nov 7 '11 at 17:25
    
webcache.googleusercontent.com/… –  Nowaker Dec 18 '11 at 15:58
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Run Code Run might be what you need.

Edit: link removed since it no longer refers to the former Run Code Run site.

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1  
Now about to be shut down. :( –  Andrew Grimm Apr 9 '10 at 0:57
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And then, there is CI Joe:

It's like an old rusty pickup truck: it might be smelly and gross, but it gets the job done.

We use it on a daily basis.

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I only like CI joe, I have had issues with all the rest, CI Joe is the absolute minimum to get the job done, super Agile and reliable. The hudson source is horrible, and the UI does not appeal to me.

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I just published a very simple Continuous Integration App for RubyOnRails + SVN/GIT. Maybe you should give it a try:

http://github.com/felipegiotto/Inotegration/tree/master

I took some ideas of measurement and testing tools and, after trying some CI tools and not liking anyone of them, I decided to build my own, without needing to build big XML files or any other configuration. Just the way Rails was made to be.

If you like, please send me some feedback..

Best regards,

Felipe Giotto.

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Running CI after every commit seems rather expensive if you subscribe to the "commit often" philosophy. How about running a simple cronjob every few hours and email the results to a dev mailing list?

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Or, how about just set up your CI server to only poll for changes once every hour? Most CI apps support this setting. –  jerhinesmith Mar 19 '10 at 19:24
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With git you can commit often but push rarely. –  Vanuan Mar 19 '12 at 19:41
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I just configured a Hudson/Jenkins for it. The ci_reporter gem can help formatting JUnit output, what expected by Hudson, and Hudson has a Rails plugin, so I can see rcov coverage, test reports, rails stats and even more.

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Could you compare your setup with the other alternatives? –  Andrei Aug 5 '11 at 21:14
    
As I using Rails 2.3.x for my production projects, currently not, because the most other alternative requires Rails 3.x. However, when I can, I will test it, and publish my experiences. –  Gabor Garami Oct 30 '11 at 14:49
    
I tried Jenkins with Rails 3.x too and it works very well. I tried some other solutions too (for example IntegrityApp), but since I use Jenkins for test another projects too it became the final solution for it. It does not means IntegrityApp or other stuffs are bad, IntegrityApp is very good stuff, however I like Jenkins a bit more. –  Gabor Garami May 5 '12 at 21:49
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Do it yourself. Write a bash script to run tests and then run a deployment procedure if tests pass. Need notifications? Shoot yourself a plaintext email on success/failure. Need scheduler? Cronjob. This is $0/mo., and you will have a clue as to what you are doing. I do not see how paying someone $40/mo will help me do this in any way more efficient.

Consider for example: my deployment is failing because of an incorrectly configured asset pipeline (assets fail to precompile). This is not going to be caught with unit, functional, integration, regression, or any other tests. This error will not be caught by CI. The amount of time I would spend writing a bash script is likely to be less than the amount of time I would spend setting up a CI environment, and I'll save myself $40/mo.

Juuuuuust throwing my two pennies into the discussion ; )

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You should consider looking at CloudMunch as well. This provides a polyglot platform to allow you to have different languages as part of your codebase, with rich set of build metadata.

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