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In my app I need to execute different future task. My call would be something like

public Item getTaskResult(){
        //creating the task object named task
        Executors.newCachedThreadPool().execute(task);

        ....
}

Is it wrong to just call Executors.newCachedThreadPool() ? Should I keep a reference to it? Am I wasting some resources doing in my way?

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Take it this way: In your house, would you want to create a new swimming pool every time you need to swim? Create just one CachedThreadPool and use it. –  Aman Agnihotri Feb 27 at 12:56
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should probably have only one CachedThreadPool in your whole application. Doing so, it allows you to factorize resources associated to the pool and also to take advantage of a better thread re-use.

Creating a thread pool every time is a costly operation. Therefore create it once and use it as much as you want.

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Take it this way: In your house, would you want to create a new swimming pool every time you need to swim? Create just one CachedThreadPool and use it.

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The worst problem with your demonstrated code is that it has a resource leak. The thread pool will not be automatically closed, and threads killed, just because it has become unreachable. You may observe your thread count growing without bounds, until finally you get an OutOfMemoryException: cannot create a native thread.

You can legally submit a task to a new thread pool and immediately call shutdown on it. This will work correctly, even if failing to be the most performant option.

On a different level of approaching this issue, thread pools are not designed to be used in such an ephemeral fashion. You are degrading the pool to what a raw Thread instance would do, where the main point of using a thread pool is... well, pooling threads, which are expensive system resources. This is why a global singleton is the preferred approach to using the Executor Service.

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