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Is it possible to somehow run an executable through the shell and automatically make it stop executing the moment a specific string is matched/detected in the output? Just as if i would hit CTRL+C, manually?

If yes, how?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use awk:

program | awk '/pattern/{exit}1'

If you also want to print the line containing the pattern, say:

program | awk '/pattern/{print;exit}1'

For example:

$ seq 200 | awk '/9/{print;exit}1'
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

EDIT: (With reference to your comment, whether the program would stop or not.) Following is a script that would execute in an infinite loop:

n=1
while : ; do
  echo $n
  n=$((n+1))
  sleep 1
done

This script foo.sh was executed by saying:

$ time bash foo.sh | awk '/9/{print;exit}1'
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

real    0m9.097s
user    0m0.011s
sys     0m0.011s

As you can see, the script terminated when the pattern was detected in the output.


EDIT: It seems that your program buffers the output. You could use stdbuf:

stdbuf -o0 yourprogram | awk '/pattern/{print;exit}1'

If you're using mawk, then say:

stdbuf -o0 yourprogram | mawk -W interactive '/pattern/{print;exit}1'
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It seems that using this, the program is still having to finish. It takes as long as if i call it without awk. Is this possible? –  SquareCat Feb 27 at 15:58
    
@SquareCat No, the program should finish. awk would send a SIGPIPE to the program which should terminate it. See the edit above for a demo. –  devnull Feb 27 at 16:31
    
If the program produces output slowly, it could run for a while before the SIGPIPE is generated, though. –  tripleee Feb 27 at 16:41
    
@tripleee Good thought, I'll suggest using stdbuf. –  devnull Feb 27 at 16:48
    
@SquareCat It seems that the output is buffered; the edit above might work for you. –  devnull Feb 27 at 16:58

use a coprocess:

coproc CO { yourcommand; }
while read -ru ${CO[0]} line
do
    case "$line" in
        *somestring*) kill $CO_PID; break ;;
    esac
done

Note that if the command buffers its output, as many commands do when writing to a pipe, there will be some delay before the string is detected.

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I don't find any coproc binary on my system. I'm on Mac OSX, should have included that in my question though. –  SquareCat Feb 27 at 15:58
1  
It's not a binary, it's built into bash 4.x. Unfortunately, OS X has bash 3.x. If you google bash coprocesses, you can find out how to do the same thing using named pipes. –  Barmar Feb 27 at 16:02

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