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I have 2 BitArray items and I need to know if any of bits are the same in each, "AND". However, the length of the BitArrays can be different and ether one can be larger or smaller than the other.

How can I do an "AND" of two BitArrays, without getting an exception because of different sizes? This is going to happen a lot, so I need it to be fairly quick.

Example

  int[] ids = new int[3];
  ids[0] = 1;
  ids[1] = 3;
  ids[2] = 5;
  BitArray bs1 = new BitArray(ids.Max()+1);
  for (int i = 0; i < ids.Count(); ++i)
  {
    bs1[ids[i]] = true;
  }


  ids[0] = 1;
  ids[1] = 59;
  ids[2] = 1111;
  BitArray bs2 = new BitArray(ids.Max()+1);
  for (int i = 0; i < ids.Count(); ++i)
  {
    bs2[ids[i]] = true;
  }

  ids[0] = 0;
  ids[1] = 5;
  ids[2] = 33;
  BitArray bs3 = new BitArray(ids.Max()+1);
  for (int i = 0; i < ids.Count(); ++i)
  {
    bs3[ids[i]] = true;
  }


  //if bs1 AND bs2 bitcount > 0 DisplayMessage("1 and 2 has some same items")
  //if bs1 AND bs3 bitcount > 0 DisplayMessage("1 and 3 has some same items")
  //if bs2 AND bs3 bitcount > 0 DisplayMessage("2 and 3 has some same items")

To solve my problem I modified the BitArray code and added the following

public static MyBitArray TruncateCopy(MyBitArray source, int size)
{
  MyBitArray dest = new MyBitArray(size);

  //copy all the arrays
  for (int i = 0; i < dest.m_array.Length; ++i)
  {
    dest.m_array[i] = source.m_array[i];
  }

  //remove any of the items over the given size
  for (int i = ((size % 32) + 1); i < 32; ++i)
  {
    dest.m_array[i >> 5] &= ~(1 << (i & 31));
  }

  return dest;
}

public bool HasCommonBits(MyBitArray comp)
{
  MyBitArray copied, other;

  if (this.Length < comp.Length)
  {
    other = this;
    copied = TruncateCopy(comp, this.Length);
  }
  else
  {
    copied = TruncateCopy(this, comp.Length);
    other = comp;
  }

  MyBitArray compareEq = copied.And(other);

  return (!compareEq.IsEmpty());
}

public bool IsEmpty()
{
  for (int i = 0; i < this.m_array.Length; ++i)
  {
    if (m_array[i] != 0)
      return false;
  }

  return true;
}

public bool IsFull()
{
  //run through all the full sets
  for (int i = 0; i < this.m_array.Length - 1; ++i)
  {
    if (m_array[i] != -1) //-1 is all bits set in an integer
      return false;
  }

  //go through the partial one
  for (int i = 0; i < (this.Length % 32); ++i)
  {
    if (!this[i])
      return false;
  }

  return true;
}

}

share|improve this question
    
If they are different lengths, you need to first figure out how to make them the same, i.e. whther to remove the most or least significant (or other?) bit. –  Justin Harvey Feb 27 '14 at 16:03
    
If they are different lengths, then there can't be any matching bits in the longer one. Thus we can ignore the extra data in the longer BitArray. –  runfastman Feb 27 '14 at 16:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, define what you want to happen in case of differing lengths. Maybe you just want to compare the first Math.Min(len1, len2) elements. In that case write a for loop whose index variable ranges from 0 to Math.Min(len1, len2). Compare the respective array elements in the loop body.

I examined BitArray with reflector. There is no way to trim it, or to perform a partial And. You're out of luck with this class. Replace it with a custom-written class that supports what you need. Writing a bit array is not especially hard.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to use a loop, the whole point of the BitArray is a very fast check. I need a way to lob off the extra information from the longer BitArray and do the bitwize "AND" –  runfastman Feb 27 '14 at 16:48
    
Ok, I understand. I examined BitArray with reflector. There is no way to trim it, or to perform a partial And. You're out of luck with this class. Replace it with a custom-written class that supports what you need. Writing a bit array is not especially hard. –  usr Feb 27 '14 at 17:36
    
Can I quickly lengthen the shorter one with 0's. That would also work. –  runfastman Feb 27 '14 at 17:50
    
The size is fixed, alas. You can use Reflector to look at everything that is available. Note, that a custom BitArray would not be slower than the built-in one. It can even be faster. –  usr Feb 27 '14 at 18:10
    
Yea a custom one would be good, but I am just fairly new to c# and it would take me quite a while to figure out all the pieces. Most other languages have nice bitset libraries, why doesn't c#, it seems that I can't even to a quick check to see if all the bits are 1 or 0 without a loop. –  runfastman Feb 27 '14 at 18:31

Completely revised based on this comment:

The result bitarray of your example would be 01010. My original problem states that I need to see if any of the bits are the same. Thus the a resulting bitarray with any 1's would be True and all 0's would be False

BitArrray truncateCopyBA(BitArray source, int size)
{
    BitArray dest = new BitArray(size);

    for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
    {
        dest[i] = source[i];
    }

    return dest;
}

bool YourFunc(BitArray a, BitArray b)
{
    BitArray one, two;

    if (a.Length < b.Length)
    {
        one = a;
        two = truncateCopyBA(b, a.Length);
    }
    else
    {
        one = truncateCopyBA(a, b.Length);
        two = b;

        // If you want to see which bits in both arrays are both ones, then use .And()
        // If you want to see which bits in both arrays are the same, use .Not(.Xor()).
        BitArray compareEq = a.And(b);
        bool anyBitsSame=false;
        for(int i = 0; i < compareEq.Length; ++i)
        {
            if(compareEq.Get(i))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false
    }
}

I believe this is what you're looking for, but honestly your question is still quite vague after clarifications.

share|improve this answer
    
BitArray.And returns BitArray, not bool. –  Preston Guillot Feb 27 '14 at 16:06
    
@PrestonGuillot Oops, brainfart on my part... will correct in a second –  LB2 Feb 27 '14 at 16:10
    
@PrestonGuillot Thanks for noting - I believe corrected version should now do it (albeit not as compact) –  LB2 Feb 27 '14 at 16:19
    
This doesn't help. I still need results if they are different lengths. –  runfastman Feb 27 '14 at 16:46
    
@runfastman Then please clarify your question with examples of cases and result in each... i.e. how do you compare a set of 5 bits with a set of 15 bits - high level logic... then we can help with algorithm. –  LB2 Feb 27 '14 at 16:49

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