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I'm currently putting together a game engine as part of a university module and one part of it is a message handling system. I'm looking to improve on the lecturer's implementation, so any advice or criticism of my possible changes is most welcome.

Current Message structure

struct Message
{
    Entity* entity;
    std::string message;
    void* data;

    Message(Entity* entity, std::string message, void* data):
        entity(entity), message(message), data(data) {}
};

The initial implementation only has messages being sent to Entities, but I plan on using an 'interface' to allow any component of the game engine to be able to receive messages.

class IMessageReceiver
{
public:
    virtual void handleMessage(const Message& message) {}
};

struct Message
{
    IMessageReceiver* receiver;
    std::string message;
    void* data;
};
//examples
class Entity : public IMessageReceiver { };
class Game : public IMessageReceiver { };

A problem I have with the current system is the void* for the data (I just don't like using void*). This is then cast to the type it needs to be inside the handleMessage function as I know what data it should be receiving (depending on the message string)- typically it has been either a 3D vector or an Entity up to this point, but if I have it sending messages to things other than Entities then this will likely change.

I wanted to change this to use a template instead; however, I'm not sure how I'd go about doing this.

template <typename T>
struct Message
{
    IMessageReceiver* receiver;
    std::string message;
    T* data;
};

I'm somewhat familiar with templates, on a basic level, but I'm likely lacking some deeper knowledge of template trickery. I know I could pass it the type of the data when I create a new message.

//example
Entity* entity;
vec3 someVec;
Message<vec3> message(entity, "Fire", someVec);
MessageHandler::sendMessage(message);

But how would I then write up the handleMessage function declaration in IMessageReceiver, as different implementing classes will have different data in the messages sent to them?

virtual void handleMessage(const Message<?>& message) {} 

I had the thought of making IMessageReceiver a template class as well, so when a class inherits from it they set the type of data the messages they receive will be.

template <typename T>
class IMessageReceiver
{
public:
    virtual void handleMessage(const Message<T>& message) {}
};

class Entity : IMessageReceiver<vec3> {};

However, this means that a message receiver can only receive information of one type, but there could be an occasion where I might have to send data of different types to the same receiver- for example, a derived class of Entity usually receives a vec3 as the data part of the message but a new scenario requires it to receive another Entity. Another issue with this I found is that only the abstract base class Entity inherits from IMessageReceiver (not every derived class of Entity and they receive different information of different types- or could), which would then mean making Entity a template class as well so this could be set by passing it on. But I would still have this inflexible system where something can only receive messages of one type of data.

Perhaps void* is the 'best' approach, and perhaps using an interface class is not. I don't know.

Please feel free to offer up any constructive criticism you can think of. I'm not asking someone to write it for me, I'm just looking for advice on a good way of implementing what I'm attempting to do. Basically, I want to be able to make any component of the engine be able to receive messages; the data that is sent in the message is not predefined; and preferably does not use void*.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. If you require any additional information please let me know.

Gavin

share|improve this question
    
Can you not just use a base class that has just the target entity and the message? You can derive from it for your specific messages? I would probably have used an enum for the message ID, rather than a string, but maybe that's just me:) –  Martin James Feb 27 at 16:26
    
@MartinJames So, are you suggesting having a base Message class that has the object to receive the message and the message itself (whether enum, string, or something else- string is used as that was the lecturer's implementation but it's likely another thing I would change) and then if I wanted to send a message with a vec3 as the data I would derive a Vec3Message class? And then do this for every possible type I will send as the data portion of the message? –  LoneJock Feb 27 at 17:07
    
That's what I was thinking, yes:) –  Martin James Feb 27 at 21:56
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2 Answers 2

Virtual functions require the exact signature to be known at compile time, so you cannot use "template trickery" directly to achieve what you want.

Take a look at Boost.Any as a replacement for the void* Message::data. It still requires a cast of sorts to convert it to the correct type, but it is done in a type safe manner. Also, this way the message "owns" the data so you don't have to worry about lifetime issues.

Also, instead of using IMessageReceiver, consider std::function<void(const Message&)> instead. That way, you can pass the message to any object that has a void operator()(const Message&), and you don't have bother with the complexity of a hierarchy.

Both boost::any and std::function internally use a technique known as type erasure which takes the inheritance out of the interface and allows you to treat things as values, which tends to make the code simpler to reason about.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply, I'll give both of those a look at. I tried to give your answer an 'upvote' but apparently SO requires a minimum of 15 rep to do this. I'll not mark it as the accepted answer for now (if you don't mind) as I'd like to see if anyone else has suggestions for different approaches, but I think this will likely be the accepted answer. Thanks again. –  LoneJock Feb 27 at 17:01
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Your pattern suggests that the sender knows the receiver and will send the message directly to a single receiver, so you could have the sender simply call the receiver's method directly and that method could be overloaded with "message"-specific parameters (which also solves the problem of which object "owns" the dynamically allocated message data).

A common reason for making a messaging system rather than directly calling methods on the target is to reduce coupling between objects. The observer or publish/subscribe pattern reduces coupling by making the senders of messages (mostly) unaware of the receivers of the messages. In this case, you need a way to abstract message details, which seems to be what the question is about.

You could have a virtual base class for a message, and derive message-specific types from it. The handleMessage method could then take a pointer to the base class, and then use a dynamic_cast to downcast it to the concrete message type. This is slightly nicer than passing a void* and doing an arbitrary cast, as you'd at least get some run-time type checking.

Another option is to have multiple overloads in your IMessageReceiver interface (which all have no-op implementations) and to have message senders simply call the specific method directly. This gives you compile-time type checking, but requires a recompile whenever you invent a new "message" type. (I put message in quotation marks because, in this scheme, you no longer need message objects.)

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Hmm.. I suspect that the messages are producer-consumer queued to the receiver and a direct call is not possible. –  Martin James Feb 27 at 21:57
    
@MartinJames: Fair point. My third paragraph still applies. But if this is a fire now, deliver later system, then some thought needs to be given to lifetime management (e.g., what if the receiver is destroyed before the messages is delivered? Who cleans up message data?). –  Adrian McCarthy Feb 27 at 23:40
    
Thanks for your answer, @Adrian. I made reference to it on one line but didn't specify it directly but there is a MessageHandler class. When a Message is to be sent a new one is initialised then passed to the MessageHandler::sendMessage(const Message& m) function which adds it to its queue of messages. Then during its update it pops all the messages and sends them to the relevant receiver. It's a system somewhat based on the observer pattern, is how my lecturer put it. –  LoneJock Feb 28 at 16:41
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