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I have a file A with one column with a list of strings like this:

ADAMTS9
AIP
....

I want to use the strings in file A to grep the lines that contains them in file B and file B looks like this:

chr13   50571142        50592603        ADAMTS9  21461   +
chr19   50180408        50191707        AIP   11299   +
chr19   50180408        50193000        AIP-S1   6532    -

I have used:

grep -F -i -w -f A B 

and it was able to grep all the 3 lines above. However, I only want the first two lines to be grep'ed and the third line with AIP-S1 isn't an exact match with AIP..

Can someone tell me how to fix the command to do that?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use awk instead:

awk 'FNR==NR{a[$1];next} ($4 in a)' A B
chr13   50571142        50592603        ADAMTS9  21461   +
chr19   50180408        50191707        AIP   11299   +

OR to search in any field:

awk 'FNR==NR{a[$1];next} {for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) if ($i in a) print}' A B
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1  
this is cool !! –  olala Feb 27 '14 at 17:08

You are using -w to do whole word searching. The trouble is that in "AIP-S1" the "-" character is not a word character. So "AIP" is found as a whole word.

This crazy command works to transform the patterns file to include "word-boundary-like" patterns:

$ grep -if <(sed 's/^/\\(^\\|[[:space:]]\\)/; s/$/\\($\\|[[:space:]]\\)/' A) B
chr13   50571142        50592603        ADAMTS9  21461   +
chr19   50180408        50191707        AIP   11299   +
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1  
yeah, that's a crazy command... –  olala Feb 27 '14 at 19:48

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