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I have three classes

class A
class B
class C

I have two maps

std::map<A*, B*> myMap1;
std::map<A*, C*> myMap2;

and object pointers of A

A* obj_ptr_A1 = new A; and so on

I want to perform a find_if on both the maps for A*, so I wrote a functor and overloaded operator () twice as follows

class functor
{
    private:
        A* m_member;
    public:
        explicit functor(A* input) : m_member(input){}

        bool operator()(const std::pair<A*, B*>& iter) const
        {
             return (m_member->GetValue() == (iter.first)->GetValue());
        }

        bool operator()(const std::pair<A*, C*>& iter) const
        {
             return (m_member->GetValue() == (iter.first)->GetValue());
        }
};

where GetValue() is a member function of A returning an integer. Usage:

if(std::find_if(myMap1.begin(), myMap1.end(), functor(obj_ptr_A1)) != myMap1.end())
{
    std::cout << "Found in myMap1" << std::endl;
}


if(std::find_if(myMap2.begin(), myMap2.end(), functor(obj_ptr_A1)) != myMap2.end())
{
    std::cout << "Found in myMap2" << std::endl;
}

This gives me compilation error error C3066: there are multiple ways that an object of this type can be called with these arguments Is this overloading wrong?

Full code is here http://pastebin.com/DnUQKHPp It gives compilation error.

share|improve this question
1  
Try a std::pair<A* const, B*> const& etc. You could also use a function template, as the functions seem identical/similar: template<class T> bool operator()(T const&) const { ... } –  dyp Feb 27 at 18:48
2  
Hmm can you provide an SSCCE? –  dyp Feb 27 at 18:49
1  
The overloads of operator() are different in the pastebin than in your question :/ –  jrok Feb 27 at 19:44
1  
Well, it works –  jrok Feb 27 at 19:47
1  
This works fine ideone.com/yMgOaO –  imreal Feb 27 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

Try the following (Without testing)

template <class T>

class functor
{
    private:
        A* m_member;
    public:
        explicit functor(A* input) : m_member(input){}

        bool operator()(const std::pair<A*, T*>& iter) const
        {
             return (m_member->GetValue() == (iter.first)->GetValue());
        }
};

if(std::find_if(myMap1.begin(), myMap1.end(), functor<B>(obj_ptr_A1)) != myMap1.end())
{
    std::cout << "Found in myMap1" << std::endl;
}


if(std::find_if(myMap2.begin(), myMap2.end(), functor<C>(obj_ptr_A1)) != myMap2.end())
{
    std::cout << "Found in myMap2" << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't solve the problems that I see in the OP's post, and there are cleaner ways to write this. Your answers are usually excellent, are you tired? –  Mooing Duck Feb 27 at 22:10

What I found is that if you make the comparison Argument a template parameter instead of A* you can do different key-value combinations in the map, provided you make the functor::operator() a template for the Iterator.

This is how the functor looks like:

template<typename Argument> 
class functor
{
private:
    Argument m_member;
public:

    functor(Argument a)
        : 
            m_member(a)
    {}

    template<typename PairIterator>
    bool operator()(PairIterator iter) const
    {
        return (m_member->GetValue() == (iter.first)->GetValue());
    }
};

This is the functor generator:

template<typename Argument>
functor<Argument> make_functor(Argument const & a)
{
    return functor<Argument>(a); 
}

and here is the complete online example.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like overkill as an answer for the problem of missing a const... –  Mooing Duck Feb 27 at 22:08
    
@MooingDuck: maybe. I like it because it gets rid of overloading and works for different combinations, that's why I posted it... maybe someone finds this useful. –  tmaric Feb 27 at 22:11
    
I was unclear. This answer is good advice (ergo, no downvote), it just doesn't seem like it answers why his code isn't working at all. This answer simply replaces the broken code with much better working code, with no explanation for what was broken. –  Mooing Duck Feb 27 at 22:14
    
@MooingDuck: All clear. Should I remove the answer or address the error? –  tmaric Feb 27 at 22:16
    
I'd be happier if you stuck a sentence at the top stating what's wrong with his code, and then say "However, templates would greatly enhance your functor, as shown here..." –  Mooing Duck Feb 27 at 22:22

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