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today we had a discussion at work what of the two follwing functions is more performant, has less memory consumption and doesn't stress the gc.

public class Main {

    public void do1() {
        int result = 0;
        int val;
        do {
            val = calc(result);
            result = val * 2;
        } while (result < 1000);
    }

    public void do2() {
        int result = 0;
        do {
            final int val = calc(result);
            result = val * 2;
        } while (result < 1000);
    }

    private int calc(final int i) {
        return i + 2;
    }
}

in my opinion both are equivalent and it doesn't matter if val is defined inside or outside the loop. The only thing that came in my mind was that scope of variables should be narrowed as much as possible. But than we came to the discussion how the gc handle these case and we didn't find a solution.

we looked at the bytecode and there is no difference

Compiled from "Main.java"
public class Main {
  public Main();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return

  public void do1();
    Code:
       0: iconst_0
       1: istore_1
       2: aload_0
       3: iload_1
       4: invokespecial #2                  // Method calc:(I)I
       7: istore_2
       8: iload_2
       9: iconst_2
      10: imul
      11: istore_1
      12: iload_1
      13: sipush        1000
      16: if_icmplt     2
      19: return

  public void do2();
    Code:
       0: iconst_0
       1: istore_1
       2: aload_0
       3: iload_1
       4: invokespecial #2                  // Method calc:(I)I
       7: istore_2
       8: iload_2
       9: iconst_2
      10: imul
      11: istore_1
      12: iload_1
      13: sipush        1000
      16: if_icmplt     2
      19: return
}

Does anybody know if there is really no difference here or can solve the discussion?

share|improve this question
    
The bytecode says it all: there's NO difference. The performance in the end will depend on the JVM and the hardware you're using. – Luiggi Mendoza Feb 27 '14 at 18:47
    
I second the "narrow things as much as possible" case - developers tend to do stupid stuff with variables they can access and it's always a pleasure fixing a bug with all necessary variables in one place without looking at too much places. :-) – Smutje Feb 27 '14 at 18:55
    
There shouldn't be any difference in the above example. If you have two blocks each with their own local variable, it could help the compiler realize that the variables could share the same stack space since there's no way they would exist at the same time (although a good compiler could figure that out anyway), with the result being that you could fit more calls onto the stack before it overflows since each stack frame is a bit smaller. But if you're that close where it would make a difference, and you're not on an embedded target, you've already got problems. – ajb Feb 27 '14 at 19:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no difference in Java, as you saw when you examined the bytecode. You may see some difference in other languages, for instance if writing this same code in C.

So in your case the argument is about cosmetics and maintainability.

I'd argue that using the most specific level of scoping - as in do2 - is better, as:

  • it improves the locality of the variables you need,
  • it makes the extraction of the code block easier when refactoring,
  • it's a good habit for cases where a more complex example would indeed yield different bytecodes, and where allocating the variable in the loop isn't too costly (for large compound objects, for instance, you may not want to do this).

Different point, but in your example I'd even argue that you can inline the val variable in the next expression. Not doing so just adds noise. But I assume this was done so for the sake of the example or to print out the value.

share|improve this answer

There is no difference. Neither of these has any interaction with the garbage collector since there are no new objects being allocated. int variables are allocated on the stack.

This is reflected in the bytecode for each being identical.

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