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I'm reading about how to version symbols in an ELF shared library using GCC's ld version scripts, and I know that it is possible to export differing versions of the same symbol with a directive like:

__asm__(".symver original_foo,foo@VERS_1.1");

Which is useful if the semantics of the function change, but the library should still export the old version so that old applications using the library can still work with a newer version.

But for a C++ library, the symbol vtable for MyClass will be exported. If I later change the class by adding more virtual functions, how would I export the original class that includes the original vtable symbol in addition to the newly versioned vtable?

EDIT: I made a test case that seems to work by renaming all symbols of one class to those of another. This seems to work as I had hoped, but is it guaranteed to work or did I just get lucky? The code is below:

EDIT2: I changed the names of the classes to (hopefully) be less confusing, and split the definitions into 2 files.

EDIT3: It appears to work fine with clang++ also. I will clarify the overall question that I am asking:

Does this technique ensure binary backwards-compatibility for classes in a C++ shared library on Linux regardless of differences in virtual functions? and if not, why not? (a counterexample would be great).

libtest.h:

struct Test {
    virtual void f1();
    virtual void doNewThing();
    virtual void f2();
    virtual void doThing();
    virtual void f3();
    virtual ~Test();
};

libtest_old.h:

// This header would have been libtest.h when test0 was theoretically developed.

struct Test {
    virtual void f3();
    virtual void f1();
    virtual void doThing();
    virtual void f2();
    virtual ~Test();
};

libtest.cpp:

#include "libtest.h"
#include <cstdio>

struct OldTest {
    virtual void f3();
    virtual void f1();
    virtual void doThing();
    virtual void f2();
    virtual ~OldTest();
};

__asm__(".symver _ZN7OldTestD1Ev,_ZN4TestD1Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN7OldTestD0Ev,_ZN4TestD0Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN7OldTest7doThingEv,_ZN4Test7doThingEv@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN7OldTestD2Ev,_ZN4TestD2Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZTI7OldTest,_ZTI4Test@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZTV7OldTest,_ZTV4Test@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN7OldTest2f1Ev,_ZN4Test2f1Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN7OldTest2f2Ev,_ZN4Test2f2Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN7OldTest2f3Ev,_ZN4Test2f3Ev@LIB_0");

void OldTest::doThing(){
    puts("OldTest doThing");
}
void OldTest::f1(){
    puts("OldTest f1");
}
void OldTest::f2(){
    puts("OldTest f2");
}
void OldTest::f3(){
    puts("OldTest f3");
}
OldTest::~OldTest(){

}

void Test::doThing(){
    puts("New Test doThing from Lib1");
}
void Test::f1(){
    puts("New f1");
}
void Test::f2(){
    puts("New f2");
}
void Test::f3(){
    puts("New f3");
}
void Test::doNewThing(){
    puts("Test doNewThing, this wasn't in LIB0!");
}
Test::~Test(){

}

libtest.map:

LIB_0 {
global:
    extern "C++" {
        Test::doThing*;
        Test::f*;
        Test::Test*;
        Test::?Test*;
        typeinfo?for?Test*;
        vtable?for?Test*
    };
local:
    extern "C++" {
        *OldTest*;
        OldTest::*;
    };
};

LIB_1 {
global:
    extern "C++" {
        Test::doThing*;
        Test::doNewThing*;
        Test::f*;
        Test::Test*;
        Test::?Test*;
        typeinfo?for?Test*;
        vtable?for?Test*
    };
} LIB_0;

Makefile:

all: libtest.so.0 test0 test1

libtest.so.0: libtest.cpp libtest.h libtest.map
    g++ -fPIC -Wl,-s -Wl,--version-script=libtest.map libtest.cpp -shared -Wl,-soname,libtest.so.0 -o libtest.so.0

test0: test0.cpp libtest.so.0
    g++ test0.cpp -o test0 ./libtest.so.0

test1: test1.cpp libtest.so.0
    g++ test1.cpp -o test1 ./libtest.so.0

test0.cpp:

#include "libtest_old.h"
#include <cstdio>

// in a real-world scenario, these symvers would not be present and this file
// would include libtest.h which would be what libtest_old.h is now.

__asm__(".symver _ZN4TestD1Ev,_ZN4TestD1Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN4TestD0Ev,_ZN4TestD0Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN4Test7doThingEv,_ZN4Test7doThingEv@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN4Test2f1Ev,_ZN4Test2f1Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN4Test2f2Ev,_ZN4Test2f2Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN4Test2f3Ev,_ZN4Test2f3Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZN4TestD2Ev,_ZN4TestD2Ev@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZTI4Test,_ZTI4Test@LIB_0");
__asm__(".symver _ZTV4Test,_ZTV4Test@LIB_0");

struct MyClass : public Test {
    virtual void test(){
        puts("Old Test func");
    }
    virtual void doThing(){
        Test::doThing();
        puts("Override of Old Test::doThing");
    }
};

int main(void){
    MyClass* mc = new MyClass();

    mc->f1();
    mc->f2();
    mc->f3();
    mc->doThing();
    mc->test();

    delete mc;

    return 0;
}

test1.cpp:

#include "libtest.h"
#include <cstdio>

struct MyClass : public Test {
    virtual void doThing(){
        Test::doThing();
        puts("Override of New Test::doThing");
    }
    virtual void test(){
        puts("New Test func");
    }
};

int main(void){
    MyClass* mc = new MyClass();

    mc->f1();
    mc->f2();
    mc->f3();
    mc->doThing();
    mc->doNewThing();
    mc->test();

    delete mc;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

The vtable symbol and/or version is pretty unimportant both for the API and also for the ABI. What matters is which vtable index has which semantics. The name and/or version of the vtable does not matter.

You can achieve backward compatibility by having some light-weight runtime mechanism for retrieving a specific version of a specific interface. Assuming you have:

class MyThing: public VersionedInterface {...}; // V1
class MyThingV1: public MyThing {...};
class MyThingV2: public MyThingV1 {...};

You probably have some functionality to create MyThings:

VersionedInterface *createMyThing();

And this VersionedInterface you then need to ask for the interface Version you want (your code understands):

// Old code will ask for MyThing:
VersionedInterface *vi = createMyThing();    
MyThing *myThing = static_cast<MyThing*>(vi->getInterface("MyThing"));

// New code may ask for MyThingV2:
VersionedInterface *vi = createMyThing();    
MyThingV2 *myThing = static_cast<MyThingV2*>(vi->getInterface("MyThingV2"));
// New code may or may not get the newer interface:
if (!myThing) 
{
    // We did not get the interface version we wanted.
    // We can either consciously fall back to an older version or simply fail.
    ...
}

The class VersionedInterface just offers the getInterface() function:

class VersionedInterface
{
public:
    virtual ~VersionedInterface() {}
    virtual VersionedInterface *getInterface(const char *interfaceName) = 0;    
};

This approach has the advantage that it allows arbitrary changes to the vtable (reordering functions, inserting and deleting functions, changing function prototypes) in a clean and portable way.

You can extend the getInterface() function to also accept numeric versions, and you can in fact also use it to retrieve other interfaces of objects.

You can add interfaces to objects later on without breaking existing binary code. This is the main advantage. There is of course the cost of the boilerplate code to get the interface. And maintaining multiple versions of the same interface has its own cost of course. It should be well considered whether the effort is worth it.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks useful, thanks. But I think I have got the symbol versioning working the way I wanted by just creating a new class and renaming all symbols associated with it to the other class at a previous version. I'm not sure I understand why this shouldn't work. –  Xeno Feb 27 at 21:12
    
Whow, interesting thing this .symver construct! Thanks for sharing this. But I guess you are lucky that this works: I assume this is what happens: The C++ compiler does not care at all about the symver statements when it builds the virtual table for MyClass. It just looks at the header file, and the header file is the same for test0.cpp and test1.cpp, and the class determining the vtable layout is always Orig. The test() functions gets always the same vtable index in both cases so it is clear that this works ok. In test0.cpp the MyClass constructor will call the base class constructor of ... –  Johannes Overmann Feb 27 at 22:00
    
... class Old due to the symbol mapping to LIB_0. So mc will point to a binary vtable of Old, but in you code mc will use what the C++ compiler saw in the header, which is the vtable of Orig. When you insert the functions f1(), f2() and f3() in different orders in both class definitions you will see that you cannot map the functions so that Orig::f1() calls Old::f1(), except when they are in the same vtable position by chance. –  Johannes Overmann Feb 27 at 22:08
    
I just updated the original post with adding 3 new functions in different orders as you suggested. With these changes the two tests still work correctly however, making me more uncertain that I just got lucky. –  Xeno Feb 27 at 22:24
    
Yes, forget my theory with the vtables not matching up. Your example above will always work and is correct. This is what you did: You have a library which contains class A with vtable VA. Later you want to enhance class A and so you add class B with vtable VB to the same lib. All old programs compiled for class A will still work. All new programs using class B will also work. This way of enhancing a C++ lib is fine with all compilers and all OSes. There is no relationship between class A and class B except similar function names. You could use namespaces v0, v1 etc instead of a linker map. –  Johannes Overmann Mar 1 at 14:53

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