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In my understanding, the Haskell filter function filter a bs would filter all a's from a list bs.

Is there a simple method or variation of filter that would do the opposite, only keeping the a's from the list bs, basically creating a list of a's.

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As an aside... I always seem to get filter the wrong way around. filter odd sounds like it's going to filter out all the odd values. Actually it filters out the even values. Wuh?? I think Smalltalk had this right; it had two functions named select and reject. Makes it much clearer what it does! (Of course, nobody is going to rename the Prelude functions now...) –  MathematicalOrchid Feb 28 at 8:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well, that's imprecise wording anyway. The signature is

filter :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]

so filter a bs is described as filter all elements from bs that fulfill a.

So to "do the opposite", you just need to invert the predicate. For instance,

Prelude> filter (== 'a') "Is there a simple method or variation of filter that"
"aaaa"
Prelude> filter (/= 'a') "Is there a simple method or variation of filter that"
"Is there  simple method or vrition of filter tht"

In general:

filterNot :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
filterNot pred = filter $ not . pred

Prelude> filterNot (== 'a') "Is there a simple method or variation of filter that"
"Is there  simple method or vrition of filter tht"

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filter :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]

> filter (<5) [1 .. 10]
[1,2,3,4]

It filter some elements which saisfy some condition

The opposite function is the same function with negative boolean condition

filterNot f = filter (not . f)

> filterNot (<5) [1 .. 10]
[5,6,7,8,9,10]
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remove f = filter (not . f)

> remove odd [1..10]
[2,4,6,8,10]
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The filter function takes a predicate function of the type a -> Bool and a list of type [a], and it applies the predicate to each element of the list to determine if it should be kept. As an example, you could do filter (\x -> x < 2 || x > 10) someNumbers, which would return a list of all the values from someNumbers that are either less than 2 or greater than 10.

If you wanted all of a particular element from a list, you could do

only :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [a]
only x xs = filter (== x) xs

Since the predicate is then checking if each element is equal to a particular one.

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