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Let v1 be the target vector, v2 needs to be appended to the back of it.

I'm now doing:

v1.reserve(v1.size() + v2.size()); 
copy(v2.begin(), v2.end(), back_inserter(v1));

Is this the most efficient way? Or can it maybe be done just via copying a chunk of memory? Thanks!

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possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/201718/… –  Serge Feb 5 '10 at 15:39
    
The answers there are actually correct for this question, but not for that question (!) –  MSalters Feb 5 '10 at 15:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 30 down vote accepted

After a lot of arguing (and a reasonable comment from Matthieu M. and villintehaspam), I'll change my suggestion to

v1.insert( v1.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end() );

I'll keep the former suggestion here:

v1.reserve( v1.size() + v2.size() ); 
v1.insert( v1.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end() );

There are some reasons to do it the latter way, although none of them enough strong:

  • there is no guarantee on to what size will the vector be reallocated -- e.g. if the sum size is 1025, it may get reallocated to 2048 -- dependant on implementation. There is no such guarantee for reserve either, but for a specific implementation it might be true. If hunting for a bottleneck it might be rasonable to check that.
  • reserve states our intentions clear -- optimization may be more efficient in this case (reserve could prepare the cache in some top-notch implementation).
  • also, with reserve we have a C++ Standard guarantee that there will be only a single reallocation, while insert might be implemented inefficiently and do several reallocations (also something to test with a particular implementation).
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4  
The reserve is most likely unnecessary, since that will probably be done automatically by the insert function. –  villintehaspam Feb 5 '10 at 15:41
    
There is no guarantee that reserve will allocate exactly the amount of storage you request. The only guarantee is that capacity() will be >= to what you request. –  villintehaspam Feb 5 '10 at 15:58
4  
@villintehaspam - theres also no guarantee in the standard that insert will not do several reallocations instead of one. There is a guarantee on reserve however: It is guaranteed that no reallocation takes place during insertions that happen after a call to reserve() until the time when an insertion would make the size of the vector greater than the size specified in the most recent call to reserve(). Hence, reserve is more safer. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 5 '10 at 16:09
1  
@Kornel Kisielewicz: Actually I believe there more or less is such a guarantee (for normal iterators) in item 23.2.4.4, where the complexity is specified to be linear in the number of elements in the range [first,last) plus the distance to the end of the vector. Multiple reallocations wouldn't fit the bill, unless I am mistaken? –  villintehaspam Feb 5 '10 at 16:18
1  
@Kornel: I would probably not use reserve and trust insert. Also there is a confusion with complexity. push_back has amortized constant complexity because of the growing strategy used (usually 2*x+1) and thus even with multiple reallocation insert would have an amortized linear complexity. Note that if you are inserting with anything else than RandomAccessIterator, you may be better off not computing the length of the range and just push_back... I don't know if they made a special case for random_access_iterator_tag. –  Matthieu M. Feb 5 '10 at 18:02

Probably better and simpler to use a dedicated method: vector.insert

v1.insert(v1.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end());

As Michael mentions, unless the iterators are input iterators, the vector will figure out the required size and copy appended data at one go with linear complexity.

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5  
AS long as the the iterators are forward, bidirectional, or random access,the final size of the vector will be determined up front and reserved. So there's no need to perform a reserve() up front. If the iterators happen to be input iterators, this can't be done, and the vector might have to be reallocated several times dependending on how many items end up getting added. –  Michael Burr Feb 5 '10 at 15:46
    
@Michael, see my answer for the reason for reserve. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 5 '10 at 15:53
1  
@Kornel Kisielewicz: That is incorrect, reserve might also allocate more memory than needed. –  villintehaspam Feb 5 '10 at 15:55
    
@villintehaspam - might, that's why I wrote "strong hint" –  Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 5 '10 at 15:58
    
I suppose it all comes down to quality of implementation. I prefer to trust the implementation, because I don't see a technical reason why that reserve should make any difference. If your implementation decides to overallocate with plain insert, it is just as likely to overallocate with reserve. –  UncleBens Feb 5 '10 at 16:27

If you happen to use Boost you can download the development version of the RangeEx library from the Boost Vault. This lib. was accepted into Boost a while ago but so far it hasn't been integrated with the main distribution. In it you'll find a new range-based algorithm which does exactly what you want:

boost::push_back(v1, v2);

Internally it works like the answer given by UncleBens, but the code is more concise and readable.

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If you have a vector of pod-types, and you really need the performance, you could use memcpy, which ought to be faster than vector<>.insert(...):

v2.resize(v1.size() + v2.size());
memcpy((void*)&v1.front(), (void*)&v2[v1.size()], sizeof(v1.front())*v1.size());

Update: Although I would only use this if performance is really, really, needed, the code is safe for pod types.

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Altough I'm not 100% sure because resize does a lot of unnessesary contructor calls. –  Viktor Sehr Feb 5 '10 at 15:45
    
@dirkgently: thats why I used resize and not reserve. –  Viktor Sehr Feb 5 '10 at 15:46
    
Yes, this is very fast, but it uses implementation details. –  Notinlist Feb 5 '10 at 15:53
3  
Probably slower. It first sets the memory to zero, and then overwrites it with the correct values. A modern STL implementation detects PODs automatically, and when copying them will generate an aligned memory copy. Thus, it saves both the zeroing and the alignment check in memcpy() –  MSalters Feb 5 '10 at 15:56
    
Can I do this for vector<shared_ptr<ptime>>? (ptime is immutable) –  Alex Jenter Feb 5 '10 at 15:57

I simply did a quick performance measurement with the following code and

v1.insert( v1.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end() );

seems to be the right choice (as already stated above). Nevertheless, you find the reported performance below.

Test code:

#include <vector>
#include <string>

#include <boost/timer/timer.hpp>

//==============================================================================
// 
//==============================================================================

/// Returns a vector containing the sequence [ 0, ... , n-1 ].
inline std::vector<int> _range(const int n)
{
    std::vector<int> tmp(n);
    for(int i=0; i<n; i++)
        tmp[i] = i;
    return tmp;
}

void test_perf_vector_append()
{
    const vector<int> testdata1 = _range(100000000);
    const vector<int> testdata2 = _range(100000000);

    vector<int> testdata;

    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    printf(" METHOD:  push_back()\n");
    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    testdata.clear();
    { vector<int>().swap(testdata); }
    testdata = testdata1;
    {
        boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;
        for(size_t i=0; i<testdata2.size(); i++)
        {
            testdata.push_back(testdata2[i]);
        }
    }

    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    printf(" METHOD:  reserve() + push_back()\n");
    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    testdata.clear();
    { vector<int>().swap(testdata); }
    testdata = testdata1;
    {
        boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;
        testdata.reserve(testdata.size() + testdata2.size());
        for(size_t i=0; i<testdata2.size(); i++)
        {
            testdata.push_back(testdata2[i]);
        }
    }

    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    printf(" METHOD:  insert()\n");
    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    testdata.clear();
    { vector<int>().swap(testdata); }
    testdata = testdata1;
    {
        boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;

        testdata.insert( testdata.end(), testdata2.begin(), testdata2.end() );
    }

    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    printf(" METHOD:  reserve() + insert()\n");
    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    testdata.clear();
    { vector<int>().swap(testdata); }
    testdata = testdata1;
    {
        boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;

        testdata.reserve( testdata.size() + testdata.size() ); 
        testdata.insert( testdata.end(), testdata2.begin(), testdata2.end() );
    }

    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    printf(" METHOD:  copy() + back_inserter()\n");
    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    testdata.clear();
    { vector<int>().swap(testdata); }
    testdata = testdata1;
    {
        boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;

        testdata.reserve(testdata.size() + testdata2.size()); 
        copy(testdata2.begin(), testdata2.end(), back_inserter(testdata));
    }

    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    printf(" METHOD:  reserve() + copy() + back_inserter()\n");
    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------\n");
    testdata.clear();
    { vector<int>().swap(testdata); }
    testdata = testdata1;
    {
        boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;

        testdata.reserve(testdata.size() + testdata2.size()); 
        copy(testdata2.begin(), testdata2.end(), back_inserter(testdata));
    }

}

With Visual Studio 2008 SP1, x64, Release mode, /O2 /LTCG the output is as follows:

--------------------------------------------------------------
 METHOD:  push_back()
--------------------------------------------------------------
 0.933077s wall, 0.577204s user + 0.343202s system = 0.920406s CPU (98.6%)

--------------------------------------------------------------
 METHOD:  reserve() + push_back()
--------------------------------------------------------------
 0.612753s wall, 0.452403s user + 0.171601s system = 0.624004s CPU (101.8%)

--------------------------------------------------------------
 METHOD:  insert()
--------------------------------------------------------------
 0.424065s wall, 0.280802s user + 0.140401s system = 0.421203s CPU (99.3%)

--------------------------------------------------------------
 METHOD:  reserve() + insert()
--------------------------------------------------------------
 0.637081s wall, 0.421203s user + 0.218401s system = 0.639604s CPU (100.4%)

--------------------------------------------------------------
 METHOD:  copy() + back_inserter()
--------------------------------------------------------------
 0.743658s wall, 0.639604s user + 0.109201s system = 0.748805s CPU (100.7%)

--------------------------------------------------------------
 METHOD:  reserve() + copy() + back_inserter()
--------------------------------------------------------------
 0.748560s wall, 0.624004s user + 0.124801s system = 0.748805s CPU (100.0%)
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Wonderful answer! –  D. L. Dec 6 '12 at 3:18

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